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place of refuge, when the mob, inflamed by a sedi- rious, deep, and dangerous, as these circumstances tious preaclier, broke forth on him with the cries of have given rise to, the blood of each reader shall be The sword of the Lord

and of Gideon-bring forth curdled, and his epidermis crisped into goose skin. the wicked Haman? Since that time how many But, hist!-here comes the landlord, with tidings, I hearts have throbbed within these walls, as the toll- suppose. that the chaise is ready: ing of the neighbouring

bell announced to them how It was no such thing--the tidings bore, that no fast the sands of their life were ebbing; how many chaise could be had that evening, for Sir Peter Pliem must have sunk at the sound-how many were sup- had carried foward my landlord's two pairs of horses ported by stubborn pride and dogged resolution-how that morning to the ancient royal borough of Bubmany by the consolations of religion? Have there bleburgh, to look after his interest there. But as not been some, who, looking back on the motives of Bubbleburgh is only one of a set of five boroughs their crimes, were scarce able to understand how they which club their shares for a member of parliament, should have had such temptation as to seduce them Sir Peter's adversary had judiciously watched his from 'virtue ? and have there not, perhaps, been departure, in order to commence a canvass in the no others, who, sensible of their innocence, were divided less royal borough of Bitem, which, as all the world between indignation at the undeserved doom which knows, lies at the very termination of Sir Peter's they were to undergo, consciousness that they had avenue, and has been held in leading-strings by him not deserved it, and racking anxiety to discover some and his ancestors for time immemorial. Now Sir way in which they might yet vindicate themselves ? Peter was thus placed in the situation of an ambi. Do you suppose any of these deep, powerful and agi- tious monarch, who, after having commenced a tating feelings, can be recorded and perused without daring inroad into his enemies'territories, is suddenly exciting a corresponding

depth of deep, powerful, and recalled by an invasion of his own hereditary domiagitating interest ?-0!

do but wait till I publish the nions. He was obliged in consequence to return from Causes Celebres of Caledonia, and you will find no the half-lost borough of Bitem, and the two pairs want of a novel or a tragedy for some time to come. (of horses which had carried him that morning to The true thing

will triumph oveș the brightest inven, Bubbleburgh, were now forcibly detained to transport tions of the most ardent imagination. Magna est him, his agent, his valet, his jester, and his hard veritas, et præpalebit."'. "I have understood,” said I, encouraged by the this detention, which to me was of as little conse

drinker, across the country to Bitem. The cause of affability of my rattling entertainer, " that less of this interest must attach to Scottish jurisprudence than to enough to my companions to reconcile them to the

quence as it may be to the reader, was important that of any other country; The general morality of delay. Like eagles, they smelled the battle afar off, our people, their sober and prudent habits". " Secure them," said the barrister, "against any and entered at full career into the Bubbleburgh

ordered a magnum of claret and beds at the Wallace, great increase of professional thieves and depreda- and Bitem politics, with all the probable petitions tors, but not against wild and wayward starts of fancy and complaints" to which they were likely to give and passion, producing crimes of an extraordinary rise. description, which are precisely those to the detail of which we listen with thrilling interest. England has

In the midst of an anxious, animated, and to me, been much longer a highly civilized country; her sub-bailies, deacons, sets of boroughs, leets, town-clerks

most unintelligible discussion, concerning provosts, jects have been very strictly amenable to laws admi- burgesses, resident and non-resident, all of a sudden nistered without fear or favour, a complete division the lawyer recollected himself. “Poor Dunover, we of labour has taken place among her subjects, and must not forget him;" and the landlord was dispatehthe very thieves and robbers form a distinct class in ed in quest of the pauvre honteux, with an earnestly society, subdivided among themselves according to civil invitation to him for the rest of the evening: I the subject of their depredations, and the mode in could not help asking the young gentlemen if they which they carry them on, acting upon regular habits knew the history of this poor man; and the counseland principles, which can be calculated and antici- lor applied himself to his pocket to recover the mepated at Bow Street, Hatton Garden, or the Old Bai- Imorial or brief from which he had stated his cause. ley. Our sister kingdom is like a cultivated field,

- "He has been a candidate for our remedium misethe farmer expects that, in spite of all his care, a cer- Trabile,” said Mr. Hardie, "commonly called a cessio tain number of weeds will rise with the corn, and bonorum. As there are divines who have doubted the can tell you beforehand their names and appearance. eternity of future punishments, so the Scotch lawBut Scotland is like one of her own Highland glens, yers seem to have thought that the crime of poverty and the moralist who reads the records of her crimi- might be atoned for by something short of perpetual nal jurisprudence,.will find as many curious anoma: imprisonment. After a month's confinement, you lous facts in the history of mind, as the botanist will must know, a prisoner for debt is entitled on a suffi. detect rare specimens among her dingles and cliffs." cient statement to our Supreme Court, setting forth

" And that's all the good you have obtained from the amount of his funds and the nature of his misthree perusals of the Commentaries on Scottish fortunes and surrendering all his effects to his credi. Criminal Jurisprudence?" said his companion. “I sup- cors, to claim to be discharged from prison." pose the learned author very little thinks that the

facts "I had heard," I replied, “ of such a humane reguwhich his erudition and acuteness have accumulated lation." for the illustration of legal doctrines, might be so arranged as to form a sort of appendix to the half-bound the foreign fellow said you may get the cessio when

“Yes,” said Halkit," and the beauty of it is as and slip-shod volumes of the circulating library." the bonorums are all spent-But what, are you puz"I'll bet you a pint of claret,” said the elder law- zling in your pockets to seek your only

memorial yer, " that he will not feel sore at the comparison. among old play-bills letters requesting a meeting of But as we say at the bar, 'I beg I may not be inter: the Faculty, rules of the Speculative Society, syllas rupted;' I have much more to say upon my Scottish bus' of lectures--all the miscellaneous contents of a collection of Causes Célèbres, You will please re- young advocate's pocket, which contains every thing collect the scope and motive given

for the contrivance but briefs and bank notes? Can you not state a case and execution of many extraordinary and daring of cessio without your memorial? Why it is done crimes, by the long civil dissensions of Scotland-by every Saturday. The events follow each other as the hereditary jurisdictions, which, until 1748, rested regularly as clock work, and one form, of conde the investigation of crimes in judges, ignorant, par- scendence might suit every one of them." tial, ur interested-by the habits of the gentry, shut “This is very unlike the variety of distress which up 19 their distant and solitary mansion-houses, this gentleman stated to fall under the consideration nursing their revengeful passions just to keep their of your judges," said I. blood from stagnating-not to mention that amiable " True,” replied Halkit;. “but Hardie spoke of national qualification, called the perfervidum inge- criminal jurisprudence, and this business is purely nium Scotorum, which our lawyers join in alleging civil. I could plead a cessio myself without the inng a reason for the severity of some of our enact- spiring honours of a gown and three-tailed periwig

When I come to treat of matters so myste- Listen.-My client was bred a journeyman weaver

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the victuals to his mouth, as if by way of penance for). "Not entirely, my friend," said Hardie; "a prison partaking of them in the company of his superiors. is a world within itself, and has its own business A short time after dinner, declining all entreaty to griefs, and joys, peculiar to its circle. Its inunates partake of the wine, which circulated freely

round, he are sometimes short-lived, but so are soldiers on serinformed himself of the hour when the chaise had vice; they are poor relatively to the world without been ordered to attend; and saying he would be in but there are degrees of wealth and poverty among readiness, modestly withdrew from the apartment, them, and so some are relatively rich also. They

"Jack," said the barrister to his companion, “I cannot stir abroad, but neither can the garrison of a remember that poor fellow's face; you spoke more besieged fort, or the crew of a ship at sea; and they truly than you were aware of; he really is one of my are not under a dispensation quite so desperate as clients, poor man.

either, for they may have as much food as they have "Pour man!" echoed Halkit--"I suppose you mean money to buy, and are not obliged to work whether ae is your one and only client ?".

they have food or not.” * That's not my fault, Jack," replied the other, But what variety of incident," said I, (not with. whose name I discovered was Hardie. You are to out a secret view to my present task,) "could possigive me all your business, you know; and if you have bly be derived from such a work as you are pleased none, the learned gentleman here knows nothing can to talk

of ?”. come of nothing.

"Infinite,” replied the young advocate. "What"You seem to have brought something to nothing ever of guilt, crime, imposture, folly, unheard-of mis. though, in the case of that honest man. He looks as fortunes, and unlooked for change of fortune, can be if he were just about to honour with his residence the found to chequer life, mny Last Speech of the Tolbooth HEART OF MID-LOTHIAN."

should illustrate with examples sufficient to gorge "You are mistaken-he is just delivered from it.- even the public's all-devouring appetite for the wonOur friend here looks for an explanation. Pray, Mr. derful and horrible. The inventor of fictitious narPattieson, have you been in Edinburgh ?”'

ratives has to rack his brains for means to diversify I answered in the affirmative.

his tale, and after all can hardly hit upon characters "Then you must have passed, occasionally at least, or incidents which have not been used again and Rough probably not so faithfully as I am doomed to again, until they are familiar to the eye of the reader, 10, through a narrow intricate passage, leading out so that the development, enlèvement, the desperate of the north-west corner of the Parliament Square, wound of which the hero never dies, the burning and passing by a high and antique building, with tur- fever from which the heroine is sure to recover, berets and iron grates,

come a mere matter of course. I join with my hoMaking good the saying odd,

nest friend Crabbe, and have an unlucky propensity Near the church and far from God"

to hope when hope is lost, and to rely upon the corkMr. Halkit broke in upon his learned counsel, to jacket, which carries the heroes of romance safe contribute his moiety to the riddle—“Having at the through all the billows of affliction.” He then dedoor the sign of the Red Man"

claimed the following passage, rather with too much “And being on the whole," resumed the counsellor, than too little emphasis : interrupting his friend in his turn, "a sort of place

"Much have I fear'd, but am no more afraid, where misfortune is happily confounded with guilt, When some chaste beauty, by some wretch betray'd, where all who are in wish to get out”

Is drawn away with such distracted speed, "And where none who have the good luck to be

That she anticipates a dreadful deed.

Not so do I-Let solid walls impound out, wish to get in," added his companion,

The captive fair, and dig a moat around; "I conceive you, gentlemen," replied I ; "you mean Let there be brazen locks and bars of steel, the prison.

And keepers cruel, such as never feel; The prison,” added the young lawyer-"You have

With not a single note the purse supply,

And when she begs, let men and maids deny t-the very reverend Tolbooth itself;. and let me Be windows there from which she dares not fall,

- you, you are obliged to us for describing it with And help so distant, 'tis in vain to call; · much modesty and brevity; for with whatever

Still means of freedom will some Power devise,

And from the baffled ruffian snatch his prize." Amplifications we might have chosen to decorate the subject, you lay entirely at our mercy, since the “The end of uncertainty," he concluded, "is the Fathers Conscript of our city have decreed, that the death of interest; and hence it happens that no one venerable edifice itself shall not remain in existence now reads novels." to confirm or to confute us."

"Hear him, ye gods!! returned his companion. "Then the Tolbooth of Edinburgh is called the "I assure you, Mr. Pattieson, you will hardly visit Heart of Mid-Lothian ?" said I.

this learned gentleman, but you are likely to find the "So termed and reputed, I assure you.”.

new novel most in repute lying on his table,-snugly "I think," said I, with the bashful diffidence with intrenched, however, beneath Stair's Institutes, or an which a man lets slip a pun in the presence of his open volume of Morrison's Decisions.". superiors," the metropolitan county may, in that "Do I deny it?”, said the hopeful jurisconsult, or case, be said to have a sad heart."

wherefore should I, since it is well known these Da"Right as my glove, Mr. Pattieson,", added Mr. lilahs seduce my wisers and my betters? May they Hardie; "and a close heart, and a hard heart-Keep not be found lurking amidst the multiplied memorials it up, Jack.".

of our most distinguished counsel, and even peeping And a wicked heart, and a poor heart," answered from under the cushion of a judge's arm-chair ? Our Halkit, doing his best.

seniors at the bar, within the bar, and even on the And yet it may be called in some sort a strong bench, read novels; and, if not belied, some of them heart, and a high heart," rejoined the advocate have written novels into the bargain. I only

say, "You see I can put you both out of heart."

that I read from habit and from indolence, not from "I have played all my hearts," said the younger real interest; that, like Ancient Pistol devouring his gentleman.

leek, I read and swear till I get to the end of the nar"Then we'll have another lead," answered his rative. But not so in the real records of human va.. companion." And as to the old and condemned Tol- garies--not so in the State Trials, or in the Buoks of booth, what pity the same honour cannot be done to Adjournal, where every now and then you read new it as has been done to many of its inmates. Why pages of the human heart, and turns of fortune far shoặld not the Tolbooth have its 'Last Speech, Con- beyond what the boldest novelist ever attempted to fession, and Dying Words ?' The old stones would produce from the coinage of his brain." be just as conscious of the honour as many a poor And for such narratives,"

I asked, "you suppose devil who has dangled like a tassel at the west ena the history of the Prison of Edinburgh might afford, of it, while the hawkers were shouting a confession appropriate materials ?"., tae culprit had never heard of."

In a degree unusually ample, my dear sır, said "I am afraid,” said I, “if I might presume to give Hardie-" Fill your glass, however, in the mean my opinion, it would be a tale of unvaried sorrow while. Was it not for

many years the place in which and guilt."

the Scottish parliament met'? Was it no: James's

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place of refuge, when the mob, inflamed by a sedi- rious, deep, and dangerous, as these circumstances, tious preaclier, broke forth on him with the cries of have given rise to, the blood of each reador shall be The sword of the Lord and of Gideon-bring forth curdled, and his epidermis crisped into goose skin. the wicked Haman? Since that time how many But, hist here comes the landlord, with tidings, I hearts have throbbed within these walls, as the toll suppose. that the chaise is ready: ing of the neighbouring

bell announced to them how It was no such thing-the lidings bore, that no fast the

sands of their life were ebbing; how many chaise could be had that evening, for Sir Peter Pliem must have sunk at the sound-how many were sup- bad carried foward my landlord's two pairs of horses ported by stubborn pride and dogged resolution-how that morning to the ancient royal borough of Bub-, many by the consolations of religion? Have there bleburgh, to look after his interest there. But as not been some, who, looking back on the motives of Bubbleburgh is only one of a set of five boroughs their crimes, were scarce able to understand how they which club their

shares for a member of parliament, should have had such temptation as to seduce them Şir Peter's adversary had judiciously watched his from virtue ? and have there not, perhaps, been departure, in order to commence a canvass in the no others, who, sensible of their innocence, were divided less royal borough of Bitem, which, as all the world between indignation at the undeserved doom which knows, lies at the very termination of Sir Peter's they were to undergo, consciousness that they had avenue, and has been held in leading-strings by him not deserved it, and racking anxiety to discover some and his ancestors for time immemorial. Now Sir way in which they might yet vindicate themselves ? Peter was thus placed in the situation of an ambi. Do you suppose any

of these deep, powerful, and agi- tious monarch, who, after having commenced a tating feelings, can be recorded and perused without daring inroad into his enemies' territories, is suddenly exciting a corresponding depth of deep, powerful, and recalled by an invasion of his own hereditary domiagitating interest ?-0! do but wait till I publish

the nions. He was obliged in consequence to return from Causes Célèbres of Caledonia, and you will find no the half-won borough of Bubbleburgh to look after want of a novel or a tragedy for some time to come. (of horses which had carried him that morning to

the half-lost borough of Bitem, and the two pairs The true thing will triumph over the brightest inven, Bubbleburgh, were now forcibly detained to transport tions of the most ardent imagination. Magna est him, his agent, his valet, his jester, and his hard veritas, et prævalebit."'. 1 have understood,” said I, encouraged by the this detention, which to me was of as little conse

drinker, across the country to Bitem. The cause of interest must attach to Scottish jurisprudence than to quence as it may be to the reader, was important that

of any other country. The general morality of enough to my companions to reconcile them to the our people, their sober and prudent habits".

delay. Like eagles, they smelled the battle afar off, “ Secure them," said the barrister, "against any and entered at full career into the Bubbleburgh

ordered a magnum of claret and beds at the Wallace, great increase of professional thieves and depreda- and Bitem politics, with all the probable "petitions tors, but not against wild and wayward starts of fancy and complaints" to which they were likely to give and passion, producing crimes of an extraordinary rise. description, which are precisely those to the detail of which we listen with thrilling interest. England has most unintelligible discussion, concerning provosts,

In the midst of an anxious, animated, and to me, been much longer a highly civilized country; her sub- bailies, deacons, sets of boroughs, leets, town-clerks jects have been very strictly amenable to laws. admi- burgesses, resident and non-resident, all of a sudden nistered without fear or favour, a complete division the lawyer recollected himself. “Poor Dunover, we of labour has taken place among her subjects, and must not forget him;" and the landlord was dispatehthe very thieves and robbers form a distinct class in ed in quest of the pauvre honteux, with an earnestly society, subdivided among themselves according to civil invitation to him for the rest of the evening, 1 the subject of their depredations, and the mode in could not help asking the young gentlemen if they which they carry them on, acting upon regular habits knew the history of this poor man; and the counseland principles, which can be calculated and antic. lor applied himself to his pocket to recover the me pated at Bow Street, Hatton Garden, or the

Old Bai- morial or brief from which he had stated his cause.

“He has been a candidate for our remedium misethe farmer expects that, in spite of all his care, a cer, rabile," said Mr. Hardie, "commonly called a cessio tain number of weeds will rise with the corn, and bonorum. As there are divines who have doubted the can tell you beforehand their names and appearance. eternity of future punishments, so the Scotch lawBut Scotland is like one of her own Highland glens, yers seem to have thought that the crime of poverty and the moralist who reads the records of her crimi- might be atoned for by something short of perpetual nal jurisprudence, will find aş many curious anoma: imprisonment. After a month's confinement, you lous facts in the history of mind, as the botanist will must know, a prisoner for debt is entitled on a suffidetect rare specimens among her dingles and cliffs." cient statement to our Supreme Court, setting forth

"And that's all the good you have obtained from the amount of his funds and the nature of his misthree perusals of the Cominentaries on Scottish fortunes and surrendering all his effects to his credi. Criminal Jurisprudence?" said his companion. “I sup- cors, to claim to be discharged from prison.' pose the learned author very little thinks that the

facts “I had heard," I replied, of such a humane reguwhich his erudition and acuteness have accumulated lation." itp

"iben for the illustration of legal doctrines, might be so ar

“Yes," said Halkit, “and the beauty of it is as ranged as to form a sort of appendix to the half-bound the foreign fellow said you may get the cessio when and slip-shod volumes of the circulating library." the bonorums are all spent-But what, are you puz

"I'll bet you a pint of claret," said the elder law-zling in your pockets to seek your only memorial yer, " that he will not feel sore at the comparison. among old play-bills letters requesting a meeting of But as we say at the bar, 'I beg I may not be inter: the Faculty, rules of the Speculative Society, sylla rupted;' I have much more to say upon my Scottish bus of lectures--all the miscellaneous contents of a collection of Causes Célèbres. You will please re-young advocate's pocket, which contains every thing collect the scope and motive given for the contrivance but briefs and bank notes? Can you not state a case and execution of many extraordinary and daring of cessio without your memorial?? Why it is done crimes, by the long civil dissensions of Scotland-by every Saturday. The events follow each other as the hereditary jurisdictions, which, until 1748, rested regularly as clock work, and one form of conde the investigation of crimes in judges, ignorant, par-scendence might suit every one of them." tial, or interested-by the habits of the gentry, shut “This is very unlike the variety of distress which ug 1 their distant and solitary mansion-houses, this gentleman stated to fall under the consideration nursing their revengeful passions just to keep their of your judges," said I. blood froin stagnating-not to mention that amiable * True," replied Halkit; "but Hardie spoke of national qualification, called the perfervidum inge- criminal jurisprudence, and this business is purely nium Scotorum, which

our lawyers join in alleging civil. I could plead a cessio myself without the inas a reason for the severity of some of our enact- spiring honours of a gown and three-tailed periwig

When I come to treat of matters so myste- Listen.-My client was bred a journeyman weaver

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PRIOR.

bade some little money--took a farm-(for conduct- | office for the decent maintenance of his family, and ing a farm, like driving a gig, comes by nature)-lale that, after a train of constant and uninterrupted missevere umes-induced to sign bills with a friend, for fortune, he could trace a dawn of prosperity

to his which he received no value--!andlord sequestrates having the good fortune to be fung.froin the top of a creditors accept a composition-pursuer sets up a mail-coach into the river Gander, in company with public-house-fails a second time-is incarcerated for an advocate and a writer to the signet. The reader a debt of ten pounds seven shillings and sixpence- will not perhaps deem himself equally obliged to the his debts amount to blank-his losses to blank-his accident, since it brings upon him the foilowing nar funds to blank-leaving a balance of blank in his fa: rative, founded upon the conversation of the evening vour. There is no opposition, your lordships will please grant commission to take his oath," Hardie now renounced this ineffectual search, in

CHAPTER II. which there was perhaps a liule affectation, and told

Whoe'cr's been at Paris must needs know the Grève us the tale of poor Dunover's distresses, with a tone

The fatal retreat of the unfortunate brave, a which a degree of feeling, which he seemed Where honour and justice most oddiy contribute, ashamed of as unprofessional, mingled with his at- To ease heroes' pains by an halter and gibbet. tempts at wit, and did him more honour. It was one

There death breaks the shackles which force had put on, of those tales which seem to argue a sort of ill-luck

And the hangman completes what the judge but began ; or fatality attached to the hero. A well-informed, Thore the squire of the poet, and knight of the post, industrious, and blameless, but poor and bashful man, Find their pains no more baulk'd, and their hopes to more had in vain essayed all the usual means by which others acquire independence, yet had never succeeded In former times, England had her Tyburn, to which beyond the attainment of bare subsistence. During the devoted victims of justice were conducted in soa brief gleam of hope, rather than of actual prosperity, lemn procession up what is now called Oxford-Road. he had added a wife and family to his cares, but the In Edinburgh, a large open streel, or rather oblong dawn was speedily overcast, Every thing retrogra- square, surrounded by high houses, called the Grass. ded with him towards the verge of the miry Slough market, was used for the same melancholy purpose. of Despond, which yawns for insolvent debtors; and it was not ill chosen for such a scene, being of conafter catching at each twig, and experiencing the pro- siderable extent, and therefore fil to accommodate a tracted agony of feeling them one by one elude his great number of spectators, such as are usually asgrasp, he actually sunk into the miry pit whence he sembled by this melancholy spectacle. On the other he hal been extricated by the professional exertions hand, few of the houses which surround it were, of Hardie.

even in early times, inhabited by persons of fashion; "And, I suppose, now you have dragged this poor so that those likely to be offended or over deeply afdevil ashore, you will leave

him half naked on the fected by such unpleasant exhibitions were not in the beach to provide for himself ?" said Halkit. · Hark way of having their quiet disturbed by them. The ye" -and he whispered something in his ear, of which houses in the Grass-market are, generally speaking, the penetrating and insinuating words, "Interest with of a mean description;, yet the place is not without my Lord," alone reached mine.

some features of grandeur, being overhung by the It is pessimi csempli,said Hardie laughing, southern side of the huge rock on which the castle "to provide

for a ruined client; but I was thinking stands, and by the moss-grown battlements and turof what you mention, provided it can be managed reted walls of that ancient fortress. But hush! here he comes."

It was the castom, until within these thirty years, The recent relation of the poor man's misfortunes or thereabouts, to use this esplanade for the scene of had given him, I was pleased to observe, a claim to public executions. The fatal day was announced to the attention and respect of the young men, who the public, by the appearance of a huge black galtreated him with great civility, and gradually engaged lows-tree towards the eastern end of the Grass-marhim in a conversation, which, much to my satisfacket. This ill-omened apparition was of great height, ţion, again turned upon the Causes Célèbres of Scol- with a scaffold surrounding is, and a double ladder land. "Emboldened by the kindness with which he placed against it, for the ascent of the unhappy crimiwas treated, Mr. Dunover began to contribute his nal and the executioner. As this apparatus was share to the amusement of the evening. Jails, like always arranged before dawn, it seemed as if the other places, have their ancient traditions, known gallows had grown out of the earth in the course of only to the inhabitants, and handed down from one one night, like the production of some foul demon; set of the melancholy lodgers to the next who occupy and I well remember the fright with which the school their cells. Some of these, which Dunover men- boys, when I was one of their number, used to regard tioned, were interesting, and served to illustrate the these ominous signs of deadly preparation. On the narratives of remarkable trials, which Hardie had at night after the execution the gallows again disappear. his finger ends, and which his companion was also ed, and was conveyed in silence and darkness to the well skilled in. This sort of conversation passed place where it was usually deposited, which was one away the evening till the early hour when Mr. (of the vaults under the Parliament-house, or courts Dunover chose to retire to resy, and I also retreated of justice. This mode of execution is now exchanged to take down memorandums of what I had learned, for one similar to that in front of Newgate, -- with in order to add another narrative to those which it what beneficial effect is uncertain. The mental sufhad been my chief amusement to collect, and to ferings of the convict are indeed shortened. He no write out in detail. The two young men ordered a longer stalks between the attendant clergymen, broiled bone, Madeira negus, and a pack of cards, and dressed in his grave-clothes, through w 'onsiderable commenced a game at picquet.

part of the city, looking like a moving and walking Next morning the travellers left Gandercleugh. I corpse, while yet an inhabitant of this world; but, as afterwards learned from the papers that both have the ultimate purpose of punishment has in view the been since engaged in the great political cause of prevention of crimes, ji may at least be doubted, Bubbleburgh and Bitem, a summary, case, and en- whether, in abridging the melancholy ceremony, we titled to particular dispatch; but which, it is thought have not in part diminished that appalling effect upon nevertheless, may outlast the duration of the parlia- the spectators which is the useful end of all such inment to which the contest refers. Mr. Halkit, as the dictions, and in consideration of which alone, unless newspapers informed me, acts as agent or solicitor ; in very particular cases, capital sentences can be al. and Mr. Hardie opened for Sir Peter Plyem with sin- together justified. gular ability, and to such good purpose, that I under- On the 7th day of September, 1736, these ominous stand he has since had fewer play-bills and more preparations for execution were descried

in the place briefs in his pocket. And both the young gentlemen we have described, and at an early hour the space deserve their good fortune; for I learned from Dun- around began to be occupied by several groups, who over, who called on me some weeks afterwards, and gazed on the scaffold and gibbet with a stern and communicated the intelligence with tears in his eyes, vindictive show of satisfaction very seldom festified Heat their interest had availed to obtain him a small | by the populace, whose good-nature in most cases

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forgets the crime of the condemned person, and dwells | condemned to death, chiefly on the evidence of an only on his misery. But the act of which the expect accomplice. ed culprit had been convicted was of a description Many thought, that, in consideration of the men's calculated nearly and closely to awaken and irritate erroneous opinion of the nature of the action they had the resentful feelings of the multitude. The tale is committed, justice might have been satisfied with a well known; yet it is necessary to recapitulate its less forfeiture than that of two lives. On the other leading circumstances, for the better understanding hand, from the audacity of the fact, a severo example what is to follow; and the narrative may prove long, was judged necessary; and such was the opinion of but I trust not uninteresting, even to those who have the government. When it became apparent that the heard its general issue. At any rate, some detail is sentence of death was to be executed, files, and other necessary, in order to render intelligible the subse- implements necessary for their escape, were transquent events of our narrative.

mitted secretly to the culprits by a friend from with. Contraband trade, though it strikes at the root of out. By these means they sawed a bar out of one of legitimate government, by encroaching on its reve- the prison-windows, and might have made their esnues,--though it injures the fair trader, and debauches cape, but for the obstinacy of Wilson, who, as he the minds of those engaged in it,-is not usually was daringly resolute, was doggedly pertinacious of looked upon, either by the vulgar or by their betters, his opinion. His comrade, Robertson, a young and in a very heinous point of view. On the contrary, in slender man, proposed to make the experiment of those counties where it prevails, the cleverest, boidest, passing the foremost through the gap they had made, and most intelligent of the peasantry, are uniformly and enlarging it from the outside, if necessary, to alengaged in illicit transactions, and very often with low Wilson free passage. Wilson, however, insisted the sanction of the farmers and inferior gentry. on making the first experiment, and being a robust Smuggling was almost universal in Scotland in the and lusty man, he not only found it impossible to get reigns of George I. and II. ; for the people, unac- through betwixt the bars, but, by his struggles, he customed to imposts, and regarding them as an un- jammed himself so fast, that he was unable to draw just aggression upon their ancient liberties, made no his body back again. In these circumstances discoscruple to elude them whenever it was possible to do so. very became unavoidable, and sufficient precautions

The county of Fife, bounded by two friths on the were taken by the jailer to prevent any repetition of south and north, and by the sea on the east, and the same attempt. "Robertson uttered not a word of having

a number of small seaports, was long famed reflection on his companion for the consequences of for maintaining successfully a contraband trade; and, his obstinacy; but it appeared from the sequel

, that as there were many seafaring men residing there, who Wilson's

mind was deeply impressed with the recolhad been pirates and buccaneers in their youth, there lection, that, but for him, his comrade, over whose were not wanting a sufficient number of daring men mind he exercised considerable influence, would not to carry it on. Among these, a fellow, called Andrew have engaged in the criminal enterprise which had Wilson, originally a baker in the village of Pathhead, terminated thus fatally; and that now he had bewas particularly obnoxious to the revenue officers. come his destroyer a second time, since, but for his He was possessed of great personal strength, courage, obstinacy, Robertson might have effected his escape. and cunning, -was perfectly, acquainted with the Minds like Wilson's

, even when exercised in evil coast, and capable of conducting the most desperate practices, sometimes retain the power of thinking enterprises. On several occasions he succeeded in and resolving with enthusiastic generosity. His baffling the pursuit and researches of the king's offi- whole thoughts were now bent on the possibility of cers; but he became so much the object of their sus- saving Robertson's life, without the least respect to picious and watchful attention, that at length he was his own. The resolution which he adopted, and the totally ruined by repeated seizures. The man became manner in which he carried it into effect, were strikdesperate. He considered himself as robbed and ing and unusual. plundered; and took it into his head, that he had a Adjacent to the Tolbooth or city jail of Edinburgh right to make reprisals, as he could find opportunity. is one of three churches into which the cathedral of Where the heart is prepared for evil, opportunity is St. Giles is now divided, called, from its vicinity, the seldom long wanting. This Wilson learned, that Tolbooth Church. It was the custom, that criminals the Collector of the Customs at Kirkaldy had come to under sentence of death were brought to this church, Pitten weem, in the course of his official round of with a sufficient guard, to hear and join in public duty, with a considerable sum of public money in his worship on the Sabbath before execution. It was custody. As the amount was greatly within the supposed that the hearts of these unfortunate persons, value of the goods which had been seized from him, however hardened before against feelings of devotion, Wilson felt no scruple of conscience in resolving to could not but be accessible to them upon uniting reimburse himself for his losses, at the expense of the their thoughts and voices, for the last time, along Collector and the revenue. He associated with him with their fellow-mortals, in addressing their Creator. self one Robertson, and two other idle young men, And to the rest of the congregation, it was thought whom, having been concerned in the same illicit it could not but be impressive and affecting, to find trade, he persuaded to view the transaction in the their devotions mingling with those, who, sent by the same justifiable light in which he himself considered doom of an earthly tribunal to appear where the it. They watched the motions of the Collector ; they whole earth is judged, might be considered as leings broke forcibly into the house where he lodged, -Wil- trembling on the verge of eternity. The practice, son, with two of his associates, entering the Collect- however edifying, has been discontinued, in conseor's apartment, while Robertson, the fourth, kept quence of the incident we are about to detail. watch at tils door with a drawn cutlass in his hand. The clergyman, whose daty it was to officiate in The officer of the customs, conceiving his life in the Tolbooth Church, had concluded an affecting dis danger, escaped out of his bedroom window, and fled course, part of which was particularly directed to the in his shirt, so that the plunderers, with much ease, unfortunate men, Wilson and Robertson, who were Dossessed themselves of about two hundred pounds in the pew set apart for the persons in their unhappy of public money. This robbery was committed in a situation, each secured betwixt two soldiers of the very, audacious manner, for several persons were city guard. T clergyman had reminded them, that passing in the street at the time. But Robertson, the next congregation they must join would be that representing the noise they heard as a dispute or fray of the just, or of the unjust: that the psalms they now del wixt the Collector and the people of the house, the heard must be exchanged, in the space of two brief worthy citizens of Pittenweem felt themselves no days, for eternal hallelujahs, or eternal lamentations; way called on to interfere in behalf of the obnoxious and that this fearful alternative must depend upon the revenue officer; so, satisfying themselves with this state to which they might be able to bring their ainds very superficial account of the matter, like the Levite before the moment of awful preparation: thit they in the parable, they passed on the opposite side of should not despair on account of the suddenness of the way. An alarm was at length given, military the summons, but rather to feel this comfort in their were called in the depredators were pursued, the misery, that, though all who now lifted the voice, booty recovered, and Wilson and Robertson tried and bent the knee in conjunction with them, lay unda

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