Managing Women: Disciplining Labor in Modern Japan

Voorkant
University of California Press, 23 okt. 2007 - 248 pagina's
At the turn of the twentieth century, Japan embarked on a mission to modernize its society and industry. For the first time, young Japanese women were persuaded to leave their families and enter the factory. Managing Women focuses on Japan's interwar textile industry, examining how factory managers, social reformers, and the state created visions of a specifically Japanese femininity. Faison finds that female factory workers were constructed as "women" rather than as "workers" and that this womanly ideal was used to develop labor-management practices, inculcate moral and civic values, and develop a strategy for containing union activities and strikes. In an integrated analysis of gender ideology and ideologies of nationalism and ethnicity, Faison shows how this discourse on women's wage work both produced and reflected anxieties about women's social roles in modern Japan.
 

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Inhoudsopgave

Women or Workers?
1
Womens Work in Japans Early Industrial Age
8
Japans 1929 Abolition of Night Work and the Problem of Free Time
27
Producing Workers Gendering Subjects
51
Toyo Muslin and the Labor Unrest of 1930
81
The Disciplinary Power of Ethnicity
107
Epilogue
137
Notes
163
Bibliography
203
Index
221
Copyright

Overige edities - Alles weergeven

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Populaire passages

Pagina 218 - Yoshimoto Tadasu. A peasant Sage of Japan. The life and work of Sontoku Ninomiya.

Over de auteur (2007)

Elyssa Faison is Associate Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma.

Bibliografische gegevens