Exercises for Parsing and Analysis

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J. M. Armstrong, 1912 - 157 pagina's

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Pagina 49 - CHARACTER OF THE HAPPY WARRIOR. WHO is the happy Warrior ? Who is he That every man in arms should wish to be ? — It is the generous Spirit, who, when brought Among the tasks of real life, hath wrought Upon the plan that pleased his boyish thought...
Pagina 151 - So live, that when thy summons comes to join The innumerable caravan, which moves To that mysterious realm, where each shall take His chamber in the silent halls of death, Thou go not, like the quarry-slave at night, Scourged to his dungeon, but, sustained and soothed By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.
Pagina 156 - They say he is already in the forest of Arden, and a many merry men with him ; and there they live like the old Robin Hood of England. They say many young gentlemen flock to him every day, and fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.
Pagina 90 - ... there was a rustling, that seemed like a bustling of merry crowds justling, at pitching and hustling, small feet were pattering, wooden shoes clattering, little hands clapping, and little tongues chattering, and, like fowls in a farm-yard when barley is scattering, out came the children running. All the little boys and girls, with rosy cheeks and flaxen curls, and sparkling eyes and teeth like pearls, trippiug and skipping, ran merrily after the wonderful music with shouting and laughter.
Pagina 157 - Persian's grave, I could not deem myself a slave. A king sate on the rocky brow Which looks o'er sea-born Salamis; And ships by thousands lay below, And men in nations — all were his...
Pagina 89 - You know the rest. In the books you have read, How the British regulars fired and fled, How the farmers gave them ball for ball, From behind each fence and farm-yard wall, Chasing the red-coats down the lane, Then crossing the fields to emerge again Under the trees at the turn of the road, And only pausing to fire and load.
Pagina 117 - Molten, graven, hammered and rolled ; Heavy to get and light to hold ; Hoarded, bartered, bought and sold. Stolen, borrowed, squandered, doled : Spurned by the young, but hugged by the old, To the very verge of the church-yard mold ; Price of many a crime untold ! Gold ! gold ! gold ! gold...
Pagina 158 - I pass, like night, from land to land; I have strange power of speech; That moment that his face I see, I know the man that must hear me: To him my tale I teach.
Pagina 94 - To be honest, to be kind — to earn a little and to spend a little less, to make upon the whole a family happier for his presence, to renounce when that shall be necessary and not be embittered, to keep a few friends but these without capitulation — above all, on the same grim condition, to keep friends with himself — here is a task for all that a man has of fortitude and delicacy.
Pagina 119 - Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff : you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.

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