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there will necessarily be a beautiful correspondence and harmony in every part of the conduct of those whose heart is right with God. The hope of heaven will be closely and inseparably connected with that purity of mind, and that love to God, which will preserve the soul from sin.

Thus may you attain this joyful hope of glory. And why, then, do we so incessantly listen to complaints of misery and sorrow? Is there no remedy? O ye afflicted, who are ready to cry, there is no hope for you! would to God you would cease to seek for happiness from the world, and endeavour to derive it from God! One faithful prayer will more calm the mind than the full indulgence of your fondest earthly hopes. Cease, then, to hew out broken cisterns, which can hold no water; and come to God, the Fountain of living waters. Hitherto you have sought for peace in the world: now begin to seek it in God only; seek a peace of a pure and spiritual kind, fit for an immortal spirit to receive, and for an infinite God to bestow!

Would to God, that every one who hears me would make this transporting hope of glory the object of his serious endeavours and his fervent prayers! How light would all our trials and sufferings then appear, when the prospect of eternal glory was ever dawning upon us! What an armour of defence would it be against every danger, if you could say, "All is well ; for I now can confidently look up to God as my Father, and to heaven as my home! What a defence against the fear of poverty or pain, continually to rejoice in the prospect of a heavenly inheritance! It would be a treasure which would make us rich indeed. And how unspeakably valuable would it be in that solemn hour when we must quit this life, and all our expectations from it! My brethren, I speak to you as dying men. The hour cannot be very far distant, when you and I must lie on a death-bed: and what will then appear to be the value of a well-founded hope of glory? Oh! what transporting happiness will it be then to be

able to say, "I bless God, it is well with me: I have no fears of death: I enjoy a delightful hope of glory. I am willing to quit this corrupt and sinful world, that my happy spirit may join my Redeemer, and the glorious company of the ransomed above!" Which of you does not say, May this be my lot! "Let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last end be like his."

But, alas! I must also address many who enjoy no such hope of glory. The hour of death would come upon them with dreadful terror and fearful apprehensions. And O what a state! To be summoned to appear before God with a spirit oppressed by dreadful forebodings and bitter reflections; to have no cheering prospects of the glory ready to be revealed; to be a stranger to the precious promises of the Gospel; to die in darkness, without one ray of light from Heaven to enlighten the dreary passage! Alas! that any who have lived in a Christian land, any who have sat under the sound of the Gospel, and have been hearing continually of the salvation of Christ Jesus, should be found at last in this miserable state! My brethren, whose consciences testify that this would be your state if you were summoned to-night to meet your God, I beseech you by the mercies of God, by the redemption of Jesus Christ, by the regard you feel for your own salvation, think of these things. Pause for awhile, and ask whether you choose to die eternally. On the other hand reflect on the happiness of enjoying a hope full of immortality. Which will you choose? Heaven and hell are set before you. Go, decide which shall be your portion. God soon will send the messenger of death to know your determination. May you in that hour be able to say, Lord, I have waited for thy salvation!

SERMON XIV.

ON THE CHRISTIAN'S PEACE.

John xiv. 27.

Peace I leave with you; my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.

THESE words are a part of the last discourse which our blessed Saviour held with his disciples before his crucifixion. They are replete with that tenderness and kindness which were so conspicuous in his character. His apprehension of the bitter sufferings and ignominious death which he was himself about to undergo, seemed to be entirely lost in the consideration of that distress which his disciples would endure when they should behold their beloved Master so cruelly treated, and so unexpectedly taken from them. He therefore uses the most endearing expressions, and suggests the most affecting topics of consolation. He assures them, that he would not leave them comfortless, but would send the Holy Spirit, the Comforter from above, to supply his place, till he should come again and take them to himself, to dwell with him in those mansions of glory

which he was going to prepare for them. In the mean time, "Peace," he adds, "I leave with you: my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I ́unto you." This is my last and solemn bequest-peace— my peace-such as I have myself enjoyed, and as my Gospel is eminently calculated to produce;-peace with God as your reconciled Father-peace amongst each other as my brethren—and a blessed sunshine and serenity in your own bosoms, which no outward actions shall darken or disturb, because it shall be independent of sublunary things, and inspired immediately from Heaven. For "I give you peace not as the world giveth." It is not an unmeaning compliment-a mere parting salutation, or an unavailing wish for your welfare, valuable only as a token of my regard; neither is it that transient and delusive which worldly prospeace perity may sometimes afford. I leave you the substantial blessing-such as the world, with all its enjoyments, cannot give, nor, with all its vexations, take away. Therefore, "let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid." Be not disquieted at the prospect of my departure, nor dread any calamity which calamity which may threaten you when I am gone.

These promises were not given to the immediate followers of Christ alone, but to all, in every age, who should believe in his Name. At his departure from this world of sin and sorrow, he left this blessing to his first disciples, and, through their ministry to his whole church. "Peace by him," was to be preached in every nation; and all believers are interested in the bequest, and may claim its fullest benefit. Come, therefore, O ye disciples of Jesus Christ! and let us contemplate the nature of that legacy which our departing Master has left us. Let us survey this, our blessed inheritance; and, while we meditate on this peace, may the Holy Spirit shed it abroad abundantly in our hearts!

Perfect peace is a calm and tranquil state of mind, free from tumult and anxiety, alarmed by no dangers,

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