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. And never from this Palace of dim night
Depart again : Here, here will I remain,
With worms that are thy chamber-maids ; oh here
Will I set up my everlasting Reft;
And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
From this world-weary'd fesh. Eyes, look your last!
Arms, take your last embrace ! and lips, oh you
The doors of breath, feal with a righteous kiss
A dateless bargain to engroffing death.
Come, bitter conduct ! come unsav'ry guide!
Thou desp'rate pilot, now at once run'on
The dashing rocks my sea-sick, weary, bark.
Here's to my love? Oh, true apothecary !

[Drinks the poifon. Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. [Dies.

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6 And never from this Palace speak of its instant force and efof dim night

fects. Besides, Shakespeare would Depart again. (Come lie thou hardly have made Romeo driik to io my Arms:

the bealth of his dead Mistress. Here's to thy Health. O true Though the first quarto in 1599, Apothecary !

and the two old folios acknowo Thy drugs are quick) ) Mr. ledge this absurd stuff

, I find it Pope's, and some other of the left out in several later quanto imworfer editions acknowledge ab- pressions. I ought to take notice, surdly the lines which I have put that tho' Mr. Pope has thought into parenthesis here ; and which fit to stick to the old copies in this I have expung'd from the text, addition, yet he is no fair tranfor this reason : Romeo is made scriber; for he has sunk upon us to confess the effect of the poison an hemiftich of mott profound before ever he has tafted it. I absurdity, which possesses all those fuppose, it hardly was so favoury copies, that the patient should chuse to -Come, lie thou in my Homs ; make two draughts of it. And, Here's to thy Health, where. eight lines after these, we find e'er thou tumblert in. him taking the poison in his O true Apothecary! &c. hands, and making an apostrophe

THEOBALD: to it; inviting it to perform its I have no edition but the folio, office at once; and then, and not which has all the passage here 'till then, does he clap it to his mentioned, I have followed lips, or can with any probability Mr. Theobald.

I 3

Enter

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Enter Friar Lawrence with lantborn, crows and spade.

Fri. St. Francis be my speed! How oft to-night Have

my old feet stumbled at graves ? - Who's there?

Enter Balthasar.
Balth. Here's one, a friend, and one that knows you

well.
Fri. Bliss be upon you! Tell me, good iny friend,
What torch is yond, that vainly lends his light
To grubs and eyelefs fculls ? as I difcern,
It børneth in the Capulets' Monument.

Balth. It doth so, holy Sir,--and there's my master,
One that you love.

Fri, Who is it?
Balıb. Romeo.
Fri. How long hath he been there?
Balth. Full half an hour.
Fri. Go with me to the vault.

Baltb. I dare not, Sir.
My master knows not, but I am gone hence;
And fearfully did menace me with death,
If I did stay to look on his intents.

Fri. Stay then, I'll go alone. Fear comes upon me;
O, much I fear some ill unlucky thing.

Balth. As I did. Neep under this yew tree here,
I dreamt, my master and another fought,
And that my master slew him.

Fri. Romeo !
Alack, alack, what blood is this, which stains
The stony entrance of this fepulchre ?
What mean thefe masterless and goary swords,
To lie discolour'd by this place of peace?
Romeo! oh pale! Who else? what Paris too?
And steep'd in blood ? ah, what an unkind hour

Is guilty of this lamentable chance ?
The lady ftirs.

Jul. [awaking. ] Oh comfortable Friar; where is

my Lord ?

I do remember well, where I should be;
And there I am.' Where is my Romeo?

Fri. I hear fome noise! Lady, come from that nest
Of death, contagion, and unnatural sleeps
A greater Power, than we can contradict,
Hath thwarted our intents; come, come away ;
Thy husband in thy bosom there lies dead,
And Paris too-Come, I'll dispose of thee
Among a sisterhood of holy Nuns.
Stay not to question, for the watch is coming.
Come, go, good Juliet. I dare no longer stay. (Exit.

Jul. Go, get thee hence, for I will not away. What’s here? a cup, clos’d in my true love's hand ? Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end. Ochurl, drink all, and leave no friendly drop To help me after ? I will kiss thy lips, Haply, some poison yet doth hang on them ; To make me die with a Restorative. Thy lips are warm.

Enter Boy and Watch.
Watch. Lead, boy. Which way?

Jul. Yea, noise ?
Then I'll be brief. O happy dagger!

[Finding a dagger. This is thy sheath, there rust and let me die.

(Kills herself. Boy. This is the place; there, where the torch doch

burn. Watch. The ground is bloody. Search about the

church-yard; Go, some of you, whom e'er you find, attach.

Pitiful

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Pitiful sight! here lies the County lain,
And Juliet bleeding, warm, and newly dead,
Who'here hach lain these two days buried.
Go tell the Prince. Run to the Capulets ;
7 Raise up the Montagues. Some others: search
We see the Ground whereon these Woes do lie:
But the true ground of all these piteous Woes
We cannot without Circumstance descry.

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Enter some of the Watch, with Balthasar. 2 Watch. Here's Romeo's man, «we found him in the church-yard.

1 Watch, Hold him in safety, 'till the Prince comes hither.

Enter another Watchman with Friar Lawrence. 3 Watch. Here is a Friar that trembles, sighs and

weeps. We took this mattock and this spade from him, As he was coming from this church-yard side.'

i Watch. A great suspicion. Stay the Friar too.

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Enter the Prince, and attendants. Prince. What misadventure is so early up, That calls our perfon from our morning's Rest?

7 Raise up the Montagues,

some others; fearch] Here seems to be a shyme intended, which may be easily restored ;

Reise up the Montagues. Some

We see the ground wbercer

these woes do lie,
But the true ground of all this

pireous woc
We cannot without circum-
fance refery.

Enter

orbar's, 80+

ears?

Enter Capulet and lady Capulet.
Cap. What should it be, that they so shriek abroad?

La. Cap. The people in the street cry, Romeo ?
Some, Juliet, and some, Paris; and all run
With open out-cry tow’rd our Monument,

Prince: What fear is this, which startles in your

Watch. Sovereign, here lies the County Paris Nain, And Romeo dead, and Juliet, dead before, Warm and new kill'd. Prince. Search, seek, and know, how this foul mur

der comes. Watch. Here is a Friar, and Naughter'd Romeo's

man,
With instruments upon them, fit to open
These dead men's tombs.
Cap. Oh, heav'n! oh, wife! look how our daugh-

ter bleeds.
This dagger hath mista'en ; for, 9 lo! the sheath
Lies empty on the back of Montague,
The point mis-sheathed in my daughter's bosom.

La. Cap. Oh me, this fight of death is as a bell, That warns my old age to a sepulchre,

Enter Montague. Prince. Come, Montague, for thou art early up, To see thy son and heir now early down.

Mon. Alas, my liege, my wife is dead to-night ; Grief of my son's exile hach stopt her breath. What further woe conspires against my age ?

Prince. Look, and thou shalt see.

& What frar is ibis, which

partles in your cars] Read, What fear is this, which fartles

in our ears?

lo! the feath
Lies empty-) The folio,
-For, l! his house
Is empty on the back, &c. :

Mon,

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