Elements of Mental Philosophy: Abridged and Designed as a Text-book for Academies and High Schools

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Harper & bros., 1841 - 480 pagina's

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Inhoudsopgave

of the meaning and nature of perception 14 Perception makes us acquainted with a material world 15 Of the primary and secondary qualities of matt...
27
CHAPTER III
30
Connexion of the brain with sensation and perception
31
Order in which the senses are to be considered 20 Of the sense and sensations of smell
32
Of perceptions of smell in distinction from sensations
33
Of the sense and the sensations of taste 30 31 32 ib 33
34
CHAPTER IV
35
Varieties of the sensation of sound
36
Manner in which we learn the place of sounds
37
Of the sense of touch in general and its sensations 38 27 Idea of externality suggested in connexion with the touch
38
Origin of the notion of extension and of form or figure
40
On the sensations of heat and cold
41
Of the sensations of hardness and softness
42
Of certain indefinite feelings sometimes ascribed to the touch
44
Relation between the sensation and what is outwardly sigpified
45
CHAPTER VI
46
Statement of the mode or process in visual perception
47
Of the original and acquired perceptions of sight
48
The idea of extension not originally from sight
49
Of the knowledge of the figure of bodies by the sight
50
Illustration of the subject from the blind
51
Measurements of magnitude by the
52
Of objects seen in a mist 41 Of the sun and moon when seen in the horizon
53
Of the estimation of distances by sight
54
Signs by means of which we estimate distance by sight
55
Estimation of distance when unaided by intermediate objects
56
Of objects seen on the ocean
57
ib 54 55 56
58
Of habit in relation to the smell
59
Of habit in relation to the taste
60
Of habit in relation to the hearing
62
Application of habit to the touch
64
Other striking instances of habits of touch
65
Habits considered in relation to the sight
66
Sensations may possess a relative as well as positive increase of power
68
Of babits as modified by particular callings and arts 56 The law of habit considered in reference to the perception of the outlines and forms of objects
70
Notice of some facts which favour the above doctrine
71
Additional illustrations of Mr Stewarts doctrine
72
60 62 64 65 66 68 69 70 71
73
Of conceptions of objects of sight
74
Of the influence of habit on our conceptions
76
Influence of habit on conceptions of sight 63 Of the subserviency of our conceptions to description
77
Of conceptions attended with a momentary belief
78
Conceptions which are joined with perceptions
81
Conceptions as connected with fictitious representations
82
CHAPTER IX
83
Illustrations of analysis as applied to the mind
89
76
91
77
92
General abstract notions the same with genera and species
95
CHAPTER XI
101
The beginning of knowledge is in the senses
104
There may also be internal accessions to knowledge
105
Instances of notions which have an internal origin
106
DREAMING
107
of our estimate of time in dreaming
113
Pago
120
CHAPTER II
123
Ideas of existence mind selfexistence and personal identity
124
Of the nature of unity and the origin of that notion
126
Nature of succession and origin of the idea of succession
127
Origin of the notion of duration 128 113 Illustrations of the nature of duration
128
Of time and its measurements and of eternity
129
The idea of space not of external origin
130
The idea of space has its origin in suggestion
131
power
132
Of the ideas of right and wrong
133
Origin of the ideas of moral merit and demerit
134
Of other elements of knowledge developed in suggestion 122 Suggestion a source of principles as well as of ideas ib
135
CHAPTER III
136
Further remarks on the proper objects of consciousness
137
Consciousnes a ground or law of belief 126 Instances of knowledge developed in consciousness 136 137 138
138
CHAPTER IV
140
Occasions on which feelings of relation may arise
141
Of the use of correlative terms 130 Of relations of identity and diversity
142
DEMONSTRATIVE REASONING
143
11 Relations of degree and names expressive of them 132 11 of relations of proportion
144
v Of relations of place or position
145
v Of relations of time
146
v1 Of ideas of possession
147
vii Of relations of cause and effect
148
Of complex terms involving the relation of cause and effect
149
Connexion of relative suggestion with reasoning
150
CHAPTER VII
166
Illustrations of philosophic memory
172
Further directions for the improvement of the memory
179
Approval and illustrations of these views from Coleridge
185
Use of detinitions and axioms in demonstrative reasoning
186
The opposites of demonstrative reasonings absurd
187
Demonstrations do not admit of different degrees of belief
188
Of the use of diagrams in demonstrations
189
Definition of reasoning and of propositions
191
Of differences in the power of reasoning
197
Pago
201
CHAPTER XI
206
Of the nature of moral certainty
207
Of reasoning from analogy
208
Of reasoning by induction
209
Of combined or accumulated arguments 206 207
210
CHAPTER XII
211
Care to be used in correctly stating the subject of discussion
212
Consider the kind of evidence applicable to the subject 213 199 Reject the aid of false arguments or sophisms
213
Fallacia equivocationis or the use of equivocal terms and phrases
215
Of the sophism of estimating actions and character from the cir cumstances of success merely
216
Of adherence to our opinions
217
Effects on the mind of debating for victory instead of truth
218
CHAPTER XII
219
The imagination closely related to the reasoning power
220
Definition of the power of imagination
221
Process of the mind in the creations of the imagination
222
Further remarks on the same subject 209 Illustration from the writings of Dr Reid
223
Grounds of the preference of one conception to another
224
Illustration of the subject from Milton 212 The creations of imagination not entirely voluntary
225
Illustration of the statements of the preceding section
227
On the utility of the faculty of the imagination
228
Importance of the imagination in connexion with reasoning 219 220 221 222 223 ib 224 225 ib 227 228
229
CHAPTER XIV
231
Of excited conceptions and of apparitions in general 218 Of the less permanent excited conceptions of sight
232
Of the less permament excited conceptions of sound 220 First cause of permanently vivid conceptions or apparitions Morbid sensibility of the retina ...
235
Methods of relief adopled in this case
240
I
245
Of disordered or alienated external perception
246
231
248
232
249
235
251
Or the power of reasoning in the partially insane
253
I
259
Classification of the natural sensibilities
265
The character of emotions changes so as to comform to that
271
Characteristics of emotions of beauty
273
Remarks on the beauty of forms The circle
279
Of sounds considered as a source of beauty
286
Explanation of the beauty of motion from Kaimes
292
Emotions of cheerfulness joy and gladness
295
The sources of associated beauty coincident with those of human
298
Of colours in connexion with the sublime
304
CLASS II
318
INTELLECTUAL STATES OF INTERNAL ORIGIN
321
Desires always imply an object desired
324
309
326
Instances of instincts in the human mind
330
CHAPTER IV
336
Practical results of the principle of imitation
342
CHAPTER V
358
Tendency of anger to excess and the natural checks to
365
CHAPTER VI
371
Illustrations of the filial affection
377
Of the connexion between benevolence and rectitude
383
Of patriotism or love of country
389
Section
395
Further illustrations of the results of the absence of this principle
401
390
405
Of the origin of secondary active principles
408
Classification of the moral sensibilities
414
Of the close connexion between conscience and reasoning
420
Further proof from language and literature
426
Feelings of obligation differ from those of mere approval and dis
429
Diversities in moral decisions dependent on differences in
436
CHAPTER V
442
THE SENSIBILITIES OR SENSITIVE NATURE
449
CHAPTER IL
461
Of sudden and strong impulses of the mind
467
Disordered action of the passion of fear
473
Of moral accountability in cases of natural or congenital moral
479
81

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Populaire passages

Pagina 101 - The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended ; and, I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better a musician than the wren.
Pagina 163 - Where the great Sun begins his state Robed in flames and amber light, The clouds in thousand liveries dight; While the ploughman, near at hand, Whistles o'er the furrowed land, And the milkmaid singeth blithe, And the mower whets his scythe, And every shepherd tells his tale Under the hawthorn in the dale.
Pagina 78 - Spit, fire! spout, rain! Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire, are my daughters: I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness; I never gave you kingdom, call'd you children, You owe me no subscription: then let fall Your horrible pleasure; here I stand, your slave, A poor, infirm, weak, and despis'd old man.
Pagina 303 - The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: the God of glory thundereth: the Lord is upon many waters.
Pagina 231 - The sooty films that play upon the bars Pendulous, and foreboding in the view Of superstition prophesying still Though still deceived, some stranger's near approach.
Pagina 169 - Windsor ; thou didst swear to me then, as I was washing thy wound, to marry me, and make me my lady, thy wife.
Pagina 118 - ... as we do from bodies affecting our senses. This source of ideas every man has wholly in himself; and though it be not sense, as having nothing to do with external objects, yet it is very like it, and might properly enough be called internal sense.
Pagina 187 - ... according to the deeds done in the body, whether they be good or whether they be evil...
Pagina 385 - The air was sweet and plaintive, and the words, literally translated, were these : ' The winds roared and the rains fell. The poor white man, faint and weary, came and sat under our tree. Ke has no mother to bring him milk ; no wife to grind his corn.' Chorus : 'Let us pity the white man ; no mother has he, etc., etc.
Pagina 310 - The sun had long since in the lap Of Thetis taken out his nap, And like a lobster boiled, the morn From black to red began to turn," The imagination modifies images, and gives unity to variety ; it sees all things in one, il piti nelV uno.

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