Pagina-afbeeldingen
PDF
ePub

Classical.
6—The sun for sorrow will not show its head;
Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things.

SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet, v, 3.

182. SARCASM: (See Ridicule, Irony, Mockery.)

Colloquial.
a—The gentleman is so very considerate, very; so

amiable, so gentle. His remarks are so profound,
so all-embracing, that I think we shall soon find

him editing a baby's primer.
b—Brilliant? Of course you are; so, so brilliant. Really,
it's a wonder you're not President.

Classical.
(—What, will the aspiring blood of Lancaster

Sink in the ground? I thought it would have mounted.
See how my sword weeps for the poor king's death!

SHAKESPEARE, Henry VI, III, v, 6.

183. SATISFACTION: (See Admiration.)

Colloquial.
a-Ah, that's just what I wanted, the very thing. Why,

if you had thought for a year you couldn't have
brought me anything I should like better. It's

perfectly charming.
1—That, sir, is absolutely satisfactory. It realizes our
hopes to the letter. It is perfection itself.

Classical.
C—This gentle and unforced accord of Hamlet
Sits smiling to my heart.

SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet, i, 2. 184. SCORN: (See Contempt.)

Colloquial.
a—I scorn your offer, and you too, you hypocrite.
b—I want nothing to do with you, you wretch.

[ocr errors]
[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Classical.
C—You common cry of curs! whose breath I hate

As reek o' the rotten fens,—whose loves I prize
As the dead carcasses of unburied men,
That do corrupt my air,—I banish you !

SHAKESPEARE, Coriolanus, iii, 3. 185. SECRECY:

Colloquial
A--Don't breathe this to a soul.

Classical.
bBut you'll be secret ?

SHAKESPEARE, Hamiet, i, 5. 186. SELF-DENUNCIATION: (See Admission, Indignation, Remorse.)

Colloquial.
a-I am absolutely ashamed of myself.
bI admit it, I am a coward, a wretch-it was down-
right mean of me.

Classical.
I am pigeon-livered, and lack gall
To make oppression bitter.

SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet, ii, 2. 187. SHIVERING AND SHUDDERING:

Colloquial.
2–0–ugh! it's cold.

Classical.
6Tom's a-cold Tom's a-cold.

SHAKESPEARE, King Lear, iii, 4. 188. SLOTH:

Colloquial. a—Oh, it's too much trouble to move. I'm sleepy-s0

sleepy. I could lounge here all day. 189. SOLEMNITY: (See Sadness.)

Colloquial. a–I said to the doctor, "Is there any hope?” “None,"

he answered. We kept quite still. The poor fellow was breathing his last.

[ocr errors]

b-Don't joke; it's too solemn a thing; the boy may die. (-I have just heard that Mamie is dead.

Classical.
d-

Sweets to the sweet; farewell:
I hop'd thou should’st have been my Hamlet's wife;
I thought thy bride-bed to have deck'd, sweet maid,
And not thave strew'd thy grave.

SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet, v, 1. 190. SOLICITUDE: (See Pity, Sympathy.)

Colloquial. a— Aren't you well, Willie? Feeling sick? There, don't

cry. b—Is he feeling any better today? Did he sleep at all

last night? Is there anything I can do for him? I do hope you'll tell me.

Classical. c—How does my royal lord? How fares your majesty ?

SHAKESPEARE, King Lear, iv, 7.

191. STARTLING: (See Excitement.)

Colloquial.
A–Why, how you startled me!

Classical.
5-Hark! Peace!

SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth, ii, 2. 192. STRUGGLING:

Colloquial.
a—Let go of me, do you hear? Let go! There, take
that!

Classical.
6-HAMLET (struggling with LAERTES):

I prithee take thy fingers from my throat !
Away thy hand!

SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet, v, 1.

[ocr errors]

193. STUBBORNNESS: (See Prejudice, Determination,
Obstinacy.)

Colloquial.
a-I'll not change my view, no matter what your argu-
ments are.

Classical.
b—-There is no power in the tongue of man
To alter me; I stay here on my bond.
SHAKESPEARE, Merchant of Venice, iv, 1.

. 194. SUBLIMITY: (See Awe.)

Colloquial.
a—And then, sir, as far as the eye could see, up, up, up,

mountains behind mountains. It was sublime; I
could not speak.

Classical.
6—Roll on, thou deep and dark blue ocean, roll;
Boundless, endless, and sublime.

BYRON, Childe Harold.

For likest gods they seem’d,
Stood they or moved, in stature, motion, arms,
Fit to decide the empire of great heaven.

MILTON, Paradise Lost, Book vi.
195. SURPRISE: (See Amazement.)
196. SUSPICION:

Colloquial.
2-I believe that fellow's a thief.

Classical.
6-I do not like these several councils.

SHAKESPEARE, Richard III, iii, 2.
197. SUSPENSE: (See Anxiety.)
198. SYMPATHY: (See Pity, Solicitude.)

Colloquial.
a~I am truly sorry for you. It was most unkind of

them.

C

Classical.
b-I am sorry that thou art not well.

SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet, ii, 5. 199. TENDERNESS: (See Affection.)

.

200. TERROR: (See Horror.)

Colloquial.
a—What? Would you burn my child? Stop! Stop!
b--The boat is sinking. Help! Help!

Classical.
(40 look! methinks I see my cousin's ghost

Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
Upon a rapier's point:stay, Tybalt, stay.

SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet, iv, 3. d-Avaunt! and quit my sight! . . . Hence, horrible

shadow !
Unreal mockery! hence !

SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth, iii, 4. 201. THANKS:

Colloquial.
a—I thank you very much indeed.
b—This gold watch for me? Oh, thanks!

Classical.
-For all, our thanks.

SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet, i, 2. 202. THREAT:

Colloquial. a—If you do that I'll tell the teacher. b-If you make the slightest mistake, mark my words, you shall pay for it; you shall pay for it.

.
C—If he swerve a hairbreadth from the truth I'll expose
him before you all.

Classical.
d-Unmanner'd dog! stand thou when I command:

Advance thy halberd higher than my breast,

C

« VorigeDoorgaan »