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You spurn’d me such a day; another time
You called me dog; and for these courtesies
I'll lend you this much moneys?

SHAKESPEARE, Merchant of Venice, i, 3.

142. MOCKERY: (See Ridicule, Sarcasm.)

Colloquial. a—Cry away, you great big baby-boo-hoo, boo-hoo, hoo-hoo!

Classical.
6Aye, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans

Mark him, and write his speeches in their books,
Alas! it cried, give me some drink, Titinius,
As a sick girl.

SHAKESPEARE, Julius Caesar, i, 2.

143. OBSTINACY: (See Determination, Prejudice.)

Colloquial.
a–I will not budge; not a jot, not an inch.
b—I don't want to go, and I won't go; so there.

Classical.
C-In the way of bargain, mark ye me,
I'll cavil on the ninth part of a hair.

SHAKESPEARE, Henry IV, I, iii, 1. 144. OMINATION:

Colloquial. a—Look, how black it is! There will be a storm. b-I feel it in my bones. Something terrible is going

to happen.
C—I don't want to frighten you, but there is danger
ahead.

Classical.
d-O Caesar! these things are beyond all use,
And I do fear them.

SHAKESPEARE, Julius Caesar, ii, 2. 145. PAIN: (See Agony.)

Colloquial.
a—Oh, it hurts-Oh! Oh!

Classical.
6-I bleed still! I am hurt to the death-

SHAKESPEARE, Othello, ii, 3.

146. PENITENCE: (See Regret.)

147. PERMISSION: (See Assent.)

Colloquial.
a—You may take it. You have my fullest permission.

Classical.
b-Take thy fair hour, Laertes; time be thine,
And thy best graces spend it at thy will.

SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet, i, 2. 148. PERPLEXITY:

Colloquial. a—This is the house. No, it can't be. Yes, there are

the same old steps. But I am sure it wasn't a red brick. No-yes, this must be it. No-well, —

— if I'm not mixed !

Classical. 6—Where have I been? Where am I?... I know not what to say.

SHAKESPEARE, King Lear, iv, 7. 149. PERSUASION: (See Entreaty, Advice.)

Colloquial.
a—Come on, do, and have some fun. You'll have a

glorious time. Nothing like it in your life be-
fore.
Come on.

Classical.
b—Take thrice thy money; bid me tear the bond.

SHAKESPEARE, Merchant of Venice, iv, 1.

.

C

150. PITY: (See Solicitude, Grief, Sadness.)

Colloquial. a-Oh, look at that poor bird. Its leg is broken. That's

too bad. 1Poor fellow! He had awfully bad luck. I feel sorry for him.

Classical.

Oh, I have suffered
With those that I saw suffer! a brave vessel,
Who had, no doubt, some noble creatures in her,
Dash'd all to pieces. Oh! the cry did knock
Against my very heart! Poor souls! they perish’d.

SHAKESPEARE, The Tempest, i, 2. 151. POLITENESS:

Colloquial.
a—Allow me to assist you.

Classical.
6-May it please your highness sit?

SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth, iii, 4. 152. PRAISE: (See Admiration, Acceptance.)

Colloquial.
a—Your essay was fine.
6—That's what I call courage.

Classical.
C—Brave Macbeth, (well he deserves that name).

SHAKESPEARE, Macbetiv, i, 2. d

O wise and upright judge!
How much more elder art thou than thy looks !

SHAKESPEARE, Merchant of Venice, iv, 1. 153. PREJUDICE: (See Assertion.)

Colloquial.
a—It is because it is, and that's all there is to it.
6—That may be all true, gentlemen, but just the same

I prefer my own way. I was brought up in it
and I am going to stay in it.

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Classical
(–I can give no reason, nor I will not.

SHAKESPEARE, Merchant of Venice, iv, 1. 154. PRIDE: (See Arrogance, Boasting.)

Colloquial. a—I am proud to say that they all, all must bow to me.

Classical. bAye, every inch a king !

SHAKESPEARE, King Lear, iv, 6. 155. PRAYER: (See Appeal, Entreaty, Reverence, Awe,

Love.)
156. PROMISING: (See Assertion.)

Colloquial.
A—I promise you I'll never tell as long as I live.
1-If you do as I ask, I'll give you this pencil.
(--I promise you to do exactly as you ask me.

Classical.
d-For he, today, that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother.

SHAKESPEARE, Henry V, iv, 3.
I never more will break an oath with thee

SHAKESPEARE, Merchant of Venice, v, 1. 157. PROTEST:

Colloquial. a–Stop, I object. It's unfair.

Classical.

Revoke thy gift;
Or whilst I can vent clamor from my throat
I'll tell thee, thou dost evil.

SHAKESPEARE, King Lear, i, 1. 158. RAGE:

Colloquial. a—You low, driveling cur! I'll stop your slanders, you

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Classical.
1—You slave, you cur! . . Do you bandy looks with
me, you rascal !

SHAKESPEARE, King Lear, i, 4.
Away to heaven, respective lenity,
And fire-eyed fury be my conduct now!
Now, Tybalt, take the villain back again.

SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet, iii, 1. dGo, prick thy face, and over-red thy fear,

Thou lily-livered boy. What soldiers, patch?
Death of thy soul! those linen cheeks of thine
Are counselors to fear. What soldiers, whey-face?

SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth, v, 3. 159. REBUFF: (See Refusal.)

Colloquial.
a-No! There, that's flat.

Classical.
bThou shalt have nothing but the forfeiture.

SHAKESPEARE, Merchant of Venice, iv, 1. 160. RECKLESSNESS: (See Indifference.)

Colloquial.
a—I don't care a snap of the finger whether I break my
neck or not.

Classical.
6-Slave, I have set my life upon a cast,
And I will stand the hazard of the die.

SHAKESPEARE, Richard III, v, 5. 161. REFUSAL, POLITE:

Colloquial.
aI don't like to refuse you, but really I must.
bI am sorry, but I cannot accept your kind offer.
6—No, thank you.

Classical.
d–This ring, good sir,-alas, it is a trifle;
I will not shame myself to give you this.

SHAKESPEARE, Merchant of Venice, iv, 1.

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