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and you shall have a part in the everlasting fire which is prepared for him and for his angels. It is with you the eleventh hour, but the Redeemer has not yet abandoned you. To you he saith, Why stand ye here all the day idle? Go ye also into the vineyard, and whatsoever is right that ye shall receive. Ye ought to have given yourselves first to the Lord, and then to the church by the will of God; yet still he is ready to accept of your immediate dedication of yourselves to his service, and of your last hour. Life is closing, eternity opens, and all depends on this passing moment. The Spirit and the bride say, Come, and this is Christ's own language-Him that cometh unto me I will in no wise cast out. Let Christ's farewell at the feast of tabernacles be regarded as it ought by every heart.--" In the last day, that great day of the feast, Jesus stood and cried, saying, If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink. He that believeth on me, as the scripture hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water.”

* John vii, 37, 38.

DISCOURSE XVIII.

THE LIMITS OF LIFE.

Psalm xc. 10. The days of our years are threescore

years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow : for it is soon cut off, and we fly away.

This Psalm is entitled a prayer of Moses, the man of God. It seems to have been written by him when his mind was peculiarly impressed with the frailty and mortality of man, and after some of those mournful scenes in the wilderness in which many of the Israelites perished. Standing in the place of graves, he lifts his eyes to the throne of the Eternal, and adores the Being who lives and reigns for ever. It is amidst the sad memorials of human vanity that the majesty of the King eternal is most strongly felt, and that the necessity of an interest in his favour is most apparent, with whom is unchanging blessedness and everlasting strength, who can destroy in a moment creatures dependent on his will, and grant life for evermore to the objects of his mercy.

He then, in a variety of beautiful figures, sets forth the shortness and uncertainty of human life. The course of man's days is rapid as the progress of the torrent; and as in sleep time passes away without our consciousness of its movements, so, amidst the delusion and the bustle of life, we do not mark how we

and you shall have a part in the everlasting fire which is prepared for him and for his angels. It is with you the eleventh hour, but the Redeemer has not yet abandoned you. To you he saith, Why stand ye here all the day idle? Go ye also into the vineyard, and whatsoever is right that ye shall receive. Ye ought to have given yourselves first to the Lord, and then to the church by the will of God; yet still he is ready to accept of your immediate dedication of yourselves to his service, and of your last hour. Life is closing, eternity opens, and all depends on this passing moment. The Spirit and the bride say, Come, and this is Christ's own language,-Him that cometh unto me I will in no wise cast out. Let Christ's farewell at the feast of tabernacles be regarded as it ought by every heart,-"In the last day, that great day of the feast, Jesus stood and cried, saying, If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink. He that believeth on me, as the scripture hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water."*

* John vii, 37, 38.

DISCOURSE XVIII.

THE LIMITS OF LIFE.

PSALM xc. 10. The days of our years are threescore

years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow : for it is soon cut off, and we fly away.

This Psalm is entitled a prayer of Moses, the man of God. It seems to have been written by him when his mind was peculiarly impressed with the frailty and mortality of man,

and after some of those mournful scenes in the wilderness in which many of the Israelites perished. Standing in the place of graves, he lifts his eyes to the throne of the Eternal, and adores the Being who lives and reigns for ever. It is amidst the sad memorials of human vanity that the majesty of the King eternal is most strongly felt, and that the necessity of an interest in his favour is most apparent, with whom is unchanging blessedness and everlasting strength, who can destroy in a moment creatures dependent on his will, and grant life for evermore to the objects of his mercy.

He then, in a variety of beautiful figures, sets forth the shortness and uncertainty of human life. The course of man's days is rapid as the progress of the torrent; and as in sleep time passes away without our consciousness of its movements, so, amidst the delusion and the bustle of life, we do not mark how we

hasten to the grave. Like the flower which blooms but for a day, man comes forth in his glory, and is soon trodden under foot. Such figures as these are common in the poetry of all countries ; but they appear in this Psalm with a simplicity which leads the mind at once to the lesson which they convey, and with a tenderness which touches the heart. They are obviously introduced, not to embellish, but to convince and to impress.

Moses then points out the shortening of man's days as a token of God's wrath, and, in the words of our text, describes the bounds which he hath set to his existence on earth, and beyond which we cannot pass. The limits here stated are equally applicable to human life at present; they are fixed by Him whose counsels of old are faithfulness and truth, and his wisdom and his mercy are as evident in the appointment as his justice and his power. As well might the insect which exists only for a season, or which lives only for a day, complain that its Creator hath not allotted to it so long a course of being as he hath done to man, as that we should murmur that we are not permitted to retain this bodily life for ages. The remembrance of the origin of man's mortality, of that sin by which death entered into the world, would, if we had a due consciousness of its demerit, fill us with wonder that he spares us so long, and that he supports a life in which so much is done to dishonour him.

In the present age, an uncommon eagerness has been shown to collect, and to exhibit to public admiration, fragments of ancient poetry, and such reinains of the genius of former times have been preferred by

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