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ANNALS OF OUR TIME.

1837 June 20.--Accession of Queen Victoria.On Tuesday morning, shortly after 2 o'clock, the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Lord Chamberlain left Windsor for Kensington Palace where the Princess Victoria was residing with her mother—to inform her Royal Highness of the King's death. The details of the interview current in society at the time are thus set down by Miss Wynn :-“ They reached Kensington Palace at about 5: they knocked, they rang, they thumped for a considerable time before they could rouse the porter at the gate; they were again kept waiting in the courtyard, then turned into one of the lower rooms, where they seemed forgotten by everybody. They rang the bell, and desired that the attendant of the Princess Victoria might be sent to inform her Royal Highness that they requested an audience on business of importance. After another delay, and another ringing to inquire the cause, the attendant was summoned, who stated that the Princess was in such a sweet sleep she could not venture to disturb her. · Then they said, “We are come to the Queen on business of state, and even her sleep must give way to that !' It did ; and to prove that she did not keep them waiting, in a few minutes she came into the room in a loose white nightgown and shawl, her night. cap thrown off, and her hair falling upon her shoulders, her feet in slippers, tears in her eyes, but perfectly collected and dignified."Diaries of a Lady of Quality, pp. 296, 297. Lord Melbourne was immediately sent for, and the Privy Council summoned to assemble at Kensington at 11 o'clock. At that hour the Queen, with the Duchess of Kent, entered the council chamber, attended by her officers of state, and took her seat on a throne erected for the occasion. The Lord Chancellor then allministered to her the usual oaths, binding her to govern the kingdom according to its laws and customs. She first received the homage of her uncles, the dukes of Cumberland and Sussex, the Queen with admirable grace standing up and preventing the latter from kneeling. The Cabinet Ministers and other privy councillors present took the oath of allegiance and supremacy, kneeling before the throne. The former surrendered their seals of office, which her Majesty returned, and

Ministers kissed her hand on re-appointment A declaration was drawn up, and signed by a present, acknowledging faith and constant obe dience to “ our only lawful and rightful lieg Lady Victoria, by the grace of God Queen the United Kingdom of Great Britain an Ireland, Defender of the Faith.” Her Majest was pleased to make the following Declaration -" The severe and afflicting loss which th nation has sustained by the death of his Majest; my beloved uncle, has devolved upon me th duty of administering the government of thi empire. This awful responsibility is impose upon me so suddenly, and at so early a perio of my life, that I should feel myself utterl oppressed by the burden were I not sustained by the hope that Divine Providence, which has called me to this work, will give me strength for the performance of it, and that I shall find in the purity of my intentions, and in my zeal for the public welfare, that support and those resources which usually belong to a more mature age, and to longer experience. I place my firm reliance upon the wisdom of Parliament, and upon the loyalty and affection of my people. I esteem it also a peculiar advantage that I succeed to a sovereign whose constant regard for the rights and liberties of his subjects, and whose desire to promote the amelioration of the laws and institutions of the country, have rendered his name the object of general attachment and veneration. Educated in England, under the tender and enlightened care of a most affectionate mother, I have learned from my infancy to respect and love the constitution of my native country. It will be my unceasing study to maintain the Reformed religion as hy law established, securing at the same timie to all the full enjoyment of religious liberty; and I shall steadily protect the rights, and promote, to the utmost of my power, the happiness and welfare of all classes of my subjects.' Her Majesty was also pleased to take and subscribe the oath relating to the security of the Church of Scot. land. The following day (Wednesday) was fixed for making proclamation of her acces. sion to the throne.

21.-Her Majesty left Kensington between 9 and 10 A.M. for St. James's Palace, where she was received by members of the Royal Family, Cabinet Ministers, and officers of the household. In a short time she made her appearance at the window of an ante-room

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