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was given in bonour of young llenry's assumption of the title of Prince of Wales; and in July, 1619, we find I lis Lordship entertaining the King at his liouse in the New Forest, whither he had returned from an expedition to the continent, expressly for this purpose, and under the expectation of receiving a royal visit. After discharging this duty to liis sovereign, be again left his native country, and was present in the following year, with Lord Herbert of Cherbury, at the sirge of Rees, in the dutchy of Cleve.

11 wmast this period that his reputation as a patron of literature, attained its highest celebrity, and it is greatly to be desired that tradition had enabled 18 to dwell more minutely on his intercourse with the learned. His bounty to, and encouragement of, Shakspeare have conferred immortality on his name; to Florio, we have seen, le prender a durable and etlicient support; Brathwayt, in his dediration of his "Scholar's Meilley," 1614, calls him “ learnings best favourite;" and in 1617, he contributed very liberally to relieve the vistipation of Minsheu, the author of “ The Guide to Tongues.” Doubtless, had me more ample materials for his life, these had not been the only instances of his munificence to literary talent.

Sull further promotion awaited this accomplished nobleman. When James visited Scotland, in 1617, he accompanied his movereign, and rendered himself so acceptable by his courtesy and cam, thal, on the 19th of April, 1619, he was rewarded by the confidential situation of a privy-counsellor, an honour which he had long anviously held in view.

This completion of his mishes, however, was not attended with thie imuilt which he had so sanguinely expected. He found himself umable from principle, to join in the measures of the court, and the opposition which he now commenced against the King and his ministry's, had, in a mind so ardeni, a natural tendener to recess. In 1621), and the two folloning years, he was chosen, contrary to the milies of government, treasurer of the Virginia Company, an olhar o crent weight and responsibilitv, but to which his real and Botivity in formarding the rims of that corporation gave him a jini

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appease the

claim. Such, indeed, was the sense which the company

entertained of his merits, that his name was annexed to several important parts of Virginia ; as, for instance, Southampton-hundred, Hampton-roads, &c.

Whilst he opposed the court merely in its commercial arrangements, no personal inconvenience attended his exertions; but when, in the session of parliament which took place towards the commencement of the year 1621, he deemed it necessary to withstand the unconstitutional views of ministers, he immediately felt the arm of power. He had introduced with success a motion against illegal patents; and during the sitting of the 14th of March, so sharp an altercation occurred between himself and the Marquis of Buckingham, that the interference of the Prince of Wales was necessary to

anger

of the disputants. This stormy discussion, and His Lordship’s junction with the popular party, occasioned so much suspicion on the part of government, that on the 16th of June, twelve days after the prorogation of parliament, he was committed to the custody of the Dean of Westminster ; nor was it until the 18th of the subsequent July, that he was permitted to return to his house at Titchfield, under a partial restraint, nor until the first of September, that he was entirely liberated.

Unawed, however, by this unmerited persecution, and supported by a numerous and respectable party, justly offended at the King's pusillanimity in tamely witnessing his son-in-law's deprivation of the Palatinate, he came forward, with augmented activity, in the parliament of 1624, which opened on the 9th of February. Here he sat on several committees; and when James, on the 5th of the June following, found himself compelled to relinquish his pacific system, and to enter into a treaty with the States-General, granting them permission to raise four regiments in this country, he, unfortunately for himself and his son, procured the colonelcy of one of them. *

* This Spring,” relates Wilson, “ gave birth to four brave Regiments of foot (a new apparition in the English horizon) fifteen hundred in a regiment, which were raised, and

Being under the necessity of taking up their winter-quarters at Pomendile in Holland, the Earl, and his eldest son Lord Wriothesly, were seized with a burning fever; “ the violence of which distemper," naye Wilson,

“ wrought most vigorously upon the heat of youth, overcoming the son first, and the drooping father, having overcome the fever, de parted from Rosendale with an intention to bring his wins body to England; but at Bergen-op-zoom he died of a lethargy in the vic-w and presence of the Relator, and were both in one small track brought to Southampton.” The son expired on the 5th of svemur, and his parent on the tenth, and they were both buried in the spulchre of their fathers at Titchfield, on Innocents' day,

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Thus perished, in the fifty-second year of his age, Henry Earl of Seruthampton, leaving a widow, and three daughters, who, from a letu pressved in the Cabala, appear to have been in confined circumstances ; this epistle is from the Lord Keeper Williams to the Duke of Buckingham, dated Nov. 7th, 1624, and requesting of that nobleman “ his grace and goodness towards the most distressed widow and children of my Lord Southampton.” +

If we except a constitutional warmth and irritability of temper, and their too common result, an occasional error of judgment, there did not exist, throughout the reigns of Elizabeth and James, a character more truly amiable, great, and good than was that of Lord Southampton. To have secured, indeed, the reverence and affection of Shakspeare, was of itself a sufficient passport to the purest fame; but the love and admiration which attended him was general. As a soldier, he was brave, open, and magnanimous; as a statesman remarkable for integrity and independence of mind, and perhaps no

transported into Llolland, under four gallant Collonells; the Earl of Oxford, the Earl of Southampton, the Earl of Essex, and the Lord Willoughby, since Earl of Lindsey," Ilistory of Great Britain, p. 280.

* Ilistory of Great Britain, p. 284. t Cabala, p. 299.

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individual of his age was a more enthusiastic lover, or a more
munificent patron, of arts and literature.

The virtues of his private life, as well as these features of his
public character, rest upon the authority of those who best knew
him. To the “ noble” and “honourable disposition,” ascribed to
him by Shakspeare, who affectionately declares, that he loves him
“ without end,” we can add the respectable testimony of Chapman,
Sir John Beaumont, and Wither, all intimately acquainted with him,
and the second his particular friend.

Chapman, in one of his dedicatory sonnets, prefixed to his version of the Iliad, not only applies to him the epithet “ learned,” but declares him to be the “ choice of all our country's noblest spirits * ; and Beaumont, in an Elegy on his death, tells us that his ambition was to draw

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“ A picture fit for this my noble friend,

That his dear name may not in silence die.”

* When Richard Brathwaite dedicated his “Survey of History, or a Nursery for
Gentry,” to Lord Southampton, he terms him “ Learning's select Favourite.” Vide
Restituta, vol. iii. p. 340.- Nash, dedicating his “ Life of Jacke Wilton,” 1594, to the
same nobleman, calls him “a dere lover and cherisher, as well of the Lovers of Poets, as
of Poets themselves;” and he emphatically adds,—“ Incomprehensible is the height of
your spirit, both in heroical resolution and matters of conceit. Unrepriveably perished
that booke whatsoever to wast paper, which on the diamond rocke of your judgement dis-
asterly chanceth to be shipwreckt.” Jarvis Markham also addresses our English Mecænas
in a similar style, commencing a Sonnet prefixed to his “Most honorable Tragedie of
Richard Grenvile, Knt.” in the following manner :

“ Thou glorious Laurell of the Muses' hill;
Whose

eyes doth crowne the most victorious pen:
Bright Lampe of Vertue, in whose sacred skill

Lives all the blisse of eares-inchaunting men:
and closes it with declaring, that if His Lordship would vouchsafe to approve his Muse,
immortality would be the result :-

“ So shall my tragick layes be blest by thee,
And from thy lips suck their eternitie.”

Restituta, vol. iii. pp. 410. 414.
VOL. 11.

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Being under the necessity of taking up their winter-quarters Rosendale in Holland, the Earl, and his eldest son Lord Wrioth were seized with a burning fever; “ the violence of which disten says Wilson, “ wrought most vigorously upon the heat of overcoming the son first, and the drooping father, having e the fever, departed from Rosendale with an intention to sons body to England; but at Bergen-op-zoom he died of in the view and presence of the Relator, and were both bark brought to Southampton.”* The son expired November, and his parent on the tenth, and they w in the sepulchre of their fathers at Titchfield, on 1624.

Thus perished, in the fifty-second year of his Southampton, leaving a widow, and three dau letter preserved in the Cabala, appear to h circumstances; this epistle is from the Lord Duke of Buckingham, dated Nov. 7th, 162 nobleman“ his grace and goodness tow widow and children of

my

Lord Southam If we except a constitutional warmt and their too common result, an occasi did not exist, throughout the reigns racter more truly amiable, great, a Southampton. To have secured, i

conduct and of Shakspeare, was of itself a su but the love and admiration whi soldier, he was brave, open, a markable for integrity and i

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