T. Lucreti Cari De rerum natura libri se: with an introduction and notes to books I., III., and V.

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Allyn and Bacon, 1884 - 385 pagina's
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Pagina 320 - For them no more the blazing hearth shall burn. Or busy housewife ply her evening care; No children run to lisp their sire's return, Or climb his knees the envied kiss to share.
Pagina 336 - Thou must be patient; we came crying hither. Thou know'st, the first time that we smell the air, We wawl, and cry: — I will preach to thee; mark me. Glo. Alack, alack the day ! Lear. When we are born, we cry, that we are come To this great stage of fools; This...
Pagina 131 - ... rursus in antiquas referuntur religiones et dominos acris adsciscunt, omnia posse quos miseri credunt, ignari quid queat esse, quid nequeat, finita potestas denique cuique quanam sit ratione atque alte terminus haerens.
Pagina 27 - Nunc age quod superest cognosce et clarius audi. <-/• JJnec me animi fallit quam sint obscura ; sed acri percussit thyrso laudis spes magna meum cor et simul incussit suavem mi in pectus amorem musarum, quo nunc instinctus mente vigenti 925 avia Pieridum peragro loca nullius ante trita solo.
Pagina 337 - All the rivers run into the sea ; yet the sea is not full ; unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again.
Pagina 357 - And what is so rare as a day in June? Then, if ever, come perfect days ; Then Heaven tries the earth if it be in tune, And over it softly her warm ear lays: Whether we look, or whether we listen, We hear life murmur or see it glisten; Every clod feels a stir of might, An instinct within it that reaches and towers, And, groping blindly above it for light, Climbs to a soul in grass and flowers...
Pagina 251 - All these things being considered, it seems probable to me that God in the beginning formed matter in solid, massy, hard, impenetrable, moveable particles, of such sizes and figures, and with such other properties and in such proportion to space as most conduced to the end for which he formed them...
Pagina 255 - Let war and trade and creeds and song Blend, ripen race on race, The sunburnt world a man shall breed Of all the zones and countless days. No ray is dimmed, no atom worn, My oldest force is good as new, And the fresh rose on yonder thorn Gives back the bending heavens in dew.
Pagina 343 - Ante mare et terras et quod tegit omnia caelum 5 unus erat toto naturae vultus in orbe, quem dixere chaos: rudis indigestaque moles nec quicquam nisi pondus iners congestaque eodem non bene iunctarum discordia semina rerum.
Pagina 248 - And this brings us to the true conclusion implied throughout the foregoing pages — the conclusion that it is one and the same Ultimate Reality which is manifested to us subjectively and objectively. For while the nature of that which is manifested under either form proves to be inscrutable, the order of its manifestations throughout all mental phenomena proves to be the same as the order of its manifestations throughout all material phenomena.

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