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ENTRANCE TO THE CAVE.—VIEW TAKEN FROM THE INSIDE. among the Knobs, a range of hills, which He has built a commodious hotel* near the border an extent of country, like highland entrance, in a style well suited to the place. prairies, called the Barrens. The surrounding It is made of logs, filled in with lime; with a scenery is lovely. Fine woods of oak, hickory, fine large porch, in front of which is a beauand chestnut, clear of underbrush, with tiful verdant lawn. Near by, is a funnelsmouth, verdant openings, like the parks of shaped hollow of three hundred acres; probaEnglish noblemen.

bly a cave fallen in. It is called Deer Park, The cave was purchased by Dr. John because when those animals run into it, they Croghan, for ten thousand dollars. To prevent cannot escape. There are troops of wild deer a disputed title, in case any new and distant in the immediate vicinity of the hotel ; bearopening should be discovered, he has likewise hunts are frequent, and game of all kinds bought a wide circuit of adjoining land. His abounds. enthusiasm concerning it is unbounded. It is Walking along the verge of this hollow, in fact his world; and every newly-discover- you come to a ravine, leading to Green ed chamber fills him with pride and joy, like River, whence you command a view of what that felt by Columbus, when he first kissed .

See engraving of this hotel in the International for his hand to the fair Queen of the Antilles. | August, 1851.

is supposed to be the main entrance to the rods, and emerges into a wider avenue, floorcave. It is a huge cavernous arch, filled in ed with saltpetre earth, from which the stones with immense stones, as if giants had piled have been removed. This leads directly into them there, to imprison a conquered demon. I the Rotunda, a vast hall, comprising a surface No opening has ever been effected here, nor of eight acres, arched with a dome a hundred is it easy to imagine that it could be done by feet high, without a single pillar to support the strength of man. In rear of the hotel is it. It rests on irregular ribs of dark gray a deep ravine densely wooded, and covered rock, in massive oval rings, smaller and sinalwith a luxuriant vegetable growth. It leads ler, one seen within another, till they termito Green River, and was probably once a nate at the top. Perhaps this apartment water course. A narrow ravine, diverging impresses the traveller as much as any portion from this, leads, by a winding path, to the of the cave; because from it he receives his entrance of the cave. It is a high arch of first idea of its gigantic proportions. The rocks, rudely piled, and richly covered with vastness, the gloom, the impossibility of takivy and tangled vines. At the top, is a ing in the boundaries by the light of lampsperennial fountain of sweet and cool water, all these produce a deep sensation of awe and which trickles down continually from the wonder. centre of the arch, through the pendent From the Rotunda, you pass into Audufoliage, and is caught in a vessel below. The bon's Avenue, from eighty to a hundred feet entrance of this wide arch is somewhat ob- high, with galleries of rock on each side, structed by a large mound of saltpetre, thrown jutting out farther and father, till they nearly up by workmen engaged in its manufacture, meet at top. This avenue branches out into during the last war. In the course of their a vast half-oval hall, called the Church. This excavations, they dug up the bones of a contains several projecting galleries, one of gigantic man; but, unfortunately, they buried them resembling a cathedral choir. There them again, without any memorial to mark is a gap in the gallery, and at the point of the spot. They have been sought for by the interruption, immediately above, is a rostrum, curious and scientific, but are not yet found. or pulpit, the rocky canopy of which juts

As you come opposite the entrance of the over. The gnide leads up from the adjoining cave, in summer, the tenperature changes galleries, and places a lamp each side of the instantaneously, from about 85° to below 60°, pulpit, on flat rocks, which seem made for and you feel chilled as if by the presence of the purpose. There has been preaching from an iceberg. In winter, the effect is reversed. this pulpit; but unless it was superior to most The scientific have indulged in various specu- theological teaching, it must have been pitilations concerning the air of this cave. It is fully discordant with the sublimity of the supposed to get completely filled with cold place. Five thousand people could stand in winds during the long blasts of winter, and this subterranean temple with ease. as there is no outlet, they remain pent up till So far, all is irregular, jagged rocks, thrown the atmosphere without becomes warmer than together in fantastic masses, without any parthat within; when there is, of course, a ticular style; but now begins a series of imicontinual effort toward equilibrium. Why tations, which grow more and more perfect, the air within the cave should be so fresh, in gradual progression, till you arrive at the pure, and equable, all the year round, even in end. From the Church you pass into what its deepest recesses, is not so easily explained. is called the Gothic Gallery, from its obvious Some have suggested that it is continually resemblance to that style of architecture. modified by the presence of chemical agents. Here is Muinmy Hall; so called because seWhatever may be the cause, its agreeable veral mummies have been found seated in resalubrity is observed by every visitor, and it cesses of the rock. Without any process of is said to have great healing power in diseases embalming, they were in as perfect a state of of the lungs. The amount of exertion which preservation, as the mumınies of Egypt; for can be performed here without fatigue, is the air of the cave is so dry and unchangeastonishing. The superabundance of oxygen able, and so strongly impregnated with nitre, in the atmosphere operates like moderate that decomposition cannot take place. A doses of exhilarating gas. The traveller feels mummy found here in 1813, was the body of a buoyant sensation, which tempts him to a woman five feet ten inches high, wrapped run and jump, and leap from crag to crag, and in half-dressed deer skins, on which were bound over the stones in his path. The mind, rudely drawn white veins and leaves. At moreover, sustains the body, being kept in a the feet, lay a pair of moccasons, and a handstate of delightful activity, by continual new some knapsack, made of bark: containing discoveries and startling revelations. strings of small shining seeds; necklaces of

The wide entrance to the cavern soon bears' teeth, eagles' claws, and fawns' red contracts, so that but two can pass abreast. hoofs; whistles made of cane; two rattleAt this place, called the Narrows, the air from snakes' skins, one having on it fourteen ratdark depths beyond blows out fiercely, as if tles; coronets for the head, made of erect the spirits of the cave had mustered there, feathers of rooks and eagles; smooth needles to drive intruders back to the realms of day. of horn and bone, some of them crooked like This path continues about fourteen or fifteen sail-needles; deers' sinews, for sewing, and a

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ENTRANCE TO THE GOTHIO GATE. parcel of three-corded thread, resembling actite and stalagmite formations unite in these twine. I believe one of these mummies is irregular masses of brownish yellow, which, now in the British Museum. From Mummy when the light shines through them, look like Hall you pass into Gothic Avenue, where the transparent ainber. They are sonorous as a resemblance to Gothic architecture very per- clear-toned bell. A pendent mass, called the ceptibly increases. The wall juts out in point- Bell, has been unfortunately broken, by being ed arches, and pillars, on the sides of which struck too powerfully. are various grotesque combinations of rock. The porch of columns leads to the Gothic One is an elephant's head. The tusks and Chapel, which has the circular form approsleepy eyes are quite perfect; the trunk, at priate to a true church. A number of pure first very distinct, gradually recedes, and is stalactite columns fill the nave with arches, lost in the rock. On another pillar is a lion's which in many places form a perfect Gothic head; on another, a human head with a wig, roof. The stalactites fall in rich festoons, called Lord Lyndhurst, from its resemblance | strikingly similar to the highly ornamented to that dignitary. .

chapel of Henry VII. Four columns in the From this gallery you can step into a side centre form a separate arch by themselves, cave, in which is an immense pit, called the like trees twisted into a grotto, in all irreguLover's Leap. A huge rock, fourteen or fif- lar and grotesque shapes. Under this arch teen feet long, like an elongated sugar-loaf stands Wilkins' arm-chair, a stalactite forinarunning to a sharp' point, projects half way tion, well adapted to the human figure. The over this abyss. It makes one shudder to see Chapel is the inost beautiful specimen of the the guide walk almost to the end of this pro- Gothic in the cave. Two or three of the cojectile bridge, over such an awful chasm. As lumns bave richly foliated capitals, like the yon pass along, the Gothic Avenue narrows, Corinthian. until you coine to a porch coinposed of the ! If you turn back to the main avenue, and first separate columns in the cave. The stal-strike off in another direction, yon enter a

vast room, with several projecting galleries, view. Here parties usually stop and make called the Ball Roon. In close vicinity, as it arrangements to kindle the Bengal Lights, arranged by the severer school of theologi- which travellers always carry with them. It ans, is a large amphitheatre, called Satan's has a strange and picturesque effect to see Council Chamber. From the centre rises a groups of people dotted about, at different mountain of big stones, rudely piled one above points of view, their lamps hidden behind another, in a gradual slope, nearly one hun- stones, and the light streaming into the thick dred feet high. On the top rests a huge rock, darkness, through chinks in the rocks. When big as a house, called Satan's Throne. The the lights begin to burn, their intense radivastness, the gloom, partially illurinated by ance casts a strong glare on Satan's Throne; the glare of lamps, forcibly remind one of the whole of the vast amphitheatre is revealLucifer on his throne, as represented by Mar-ed to view, and you can peer into the deep tin in his illustrations of Milton. It requires recesses of two other caves beyond. For å little imagination to transform the uncouth few moments, gigantic proportions and inrocks all around the throne, into attendant couth forms stand out in the clear, strong demons. Indeed, throughout the cave, Mar- gush of brilliant light! and then—all is darktin's pictures are continually brought to inind, ness. The effect is so like magic, that one alby tlie unearthly effect of intense gleams of most expects to see towering genii striding light on black masses of shadow. In this down the deep declivities, or startled by the Council Chamber, the rocks, with singular brilliant flare, shake off their long sleep among appropriateness, change from an imitation of the dense black shadows. Gothic architecture, to that of the Egyptian. If you enter one of the caves revealed in The dark, massive walls resemble a series of the distance, you find yourself in a deep raEgyptian tombs, in dull and heavy outline. vine, with huge piles of gray rock jutting out In this place is an angle, which forms the more and more, till they nearly meet at top. meeting point of several caves, and is there- | Looking upward, through this narrow aperfore considered one of the finest points of 'ture, you see, high, biglı above you, a vaulted

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THE STAR CHAMBER. roof of black rock, studded with brilliant spar, aspect. The deep, suspicious-looking recesses like constellations in the sky, seen at mid- and frightful crags are but partially revealed night, from the deep clefts of a mountain. in the feeble light. All at once, a Bengal This is called the Star Chamber. It makes Light blazes up, and every black rock and one think of Schiller's grand description of frowning cliff stands out in the brilliant glare. William Tell sternly waiting for Gessler, The contrast is sublime beyond imagination. among the shadows of the Alps, and of Words- It is as if a man had seen the hills and trees worth's picture of

of this earth only in the dim outline of a “Yorkshire dales

moonless night, and they should, for the first Among the rocks and winding scars, Where deep and low the bamlets lie,

time, be revealed to him in the gushing glory Beneath their little patch of sky,

of the morning sun. But the greatest wonAnd little lot of stars."

der in this region of the cave, is Mammoth In this neighborhood is a vast, dreary cham- Doine—a giant among giants. It is so imber, which Stephen, the guide, called Bandit's mensely high and vast, that three of the most Hall, the first moment his eye rested on it; powerful Bengal Lights illuminate it very imand the name is singularly expressive of its perfectly. That portion of the ceiling which character. Its ragged roughness and sullen becomes visible, is three hundred feet above gloom are indescribable. The floor is a moun- your head, and remarkably resembles the tainous heap of loose stones, and not an inch aisles of Westminster Abbey. It is supposed of even surface could be found on roof or that the top of this dome is near the surface walls. Imagine two or three travellers, with of the ground. Another route from the their lamps, passing through this place of evil Devil's Council Chamber conducts you to a

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