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SERM. indeed must be the calamities that can outXIII.

weigh these solid blessings, which all, if it be not their own fault, may enjoy. Others there are of an inferior order indeed, but which by no means deserve to be overlooked. Do we count as nothing the enjoy. ment of health, the innocent gratifications of sense, the contemplation of the various beauties of the universe, the satisfaction of internal thought and reflection, the pleasures of conversation and society, and the endearing intercourse of domestic love? How we deserved these nothings, it would be difficult for us to say, which ought alone to repress our complaints when they are withdrawn from us. Of some indeed, and these much the most valuable, we cannot be deprived but by ourselves, and if we will but retain these, they will amply como pensate and console us for the loss of the others. These are, therefore, many positive pleasures in this life, the greatest of

which all either do or might enjoy; plea- SERM,

XIII. sures which, for the most part, far exceed, both in duration and weight, the proportion of woes which are intermixed with them. Is it not then the highest ingratitude, after we have been, for a long time, experiencing great and unmerited favours at the hands of God, if the scene a little varies and presents us with darker prospects, to be impatient and discontented ?

But still farther, if the matter be accurately examined, we shall find that many of the evils, which are the subject of our hasty complaints, are brought on us by our own imprudence: disappointments fre. quently arise from unreasonable expecta. tions; that degree of poverty, which is highly oppressive and disgraceful, is the general product of idleness; sickness is, in many instances, caused by intemperance; the loss of reputation, by vice or folly: in these cases, shame, one would think, should

silence

04

SERM. indeed must be the calamities that can outXIII.

weigh these solid blessings, which all, if it be not their own fault, may enjoy. Others there are of an inferior order indeed, but which by no means deserve to be overlooked. Do we count as nothing the enjoyment of health, the innocent gratifications of sense, the contemplation of the various beauties of the universe, the satisfaction of internal thought and reflection, the pleasures of conversation and society, and the endearing intercourse of domestic love? How we deserved these nothings, it would be difficult for us to say, which ought alone to repress our complaints when they are withdrawn from us. Of some indeed, and these much the most valuable, we cannot be deprived but by ourselves, and if we will but retain these, they will amply com• pensate and console us for the loss of the others. These are, therefore, many positive pleasures in this life, the greatest of

which all either do or might enjoy; plea- SERM.

XIII. sures which, for the most part, far exceed, both in duration and weight, the proportion of woes which are intermixed with them. Is it not then the highest ingratitude, after we have been, for a long time, experiencing great and unmerited favours at the hands of God, if the scene a little varies and presents us with darker prospects, to be impatient and discontented ?

But still farther, if the matter be accurately examined, we shall find that many of the evils, which are the subject of our hasty complaints, are brought on us by our own imprudence: disappointments fre. quently arise from unreasonable expectations; that degree of poverty, which is highly oppressive and disgraceful, is the general product of idleness; sickness is, in many instances, caused by intemperance; the loss of reputation, by vice or folly: in these cases, shame, one would think, should

silence

04

SERM. indeed must be the calamities that can outXIII.

weigh these solid blessings, which all, if it be not their own fault, may enjoy. Others there are of an inferior order indeed, but which by no means deserve to be overlooked. Do we count as nothing the enjoyment of health, the innocent gratifications of sense, the contemplation of the various beauties of the universe, the satisfaction of internal thought and reflection, the pleasures of conversation and society, and the endearing intercourse of domestic love? How we deserved these notbings, it would be difficult for us to say, which ought alone to repress our complaints when they are withdrawn from us. Of some indeed, and these much the most valuable, we cannot be deprived but by ourselves, and if we will but retain these, they will amply com: pensate and console us for the loss of the others. These are, therefore, many positive pleasures in this life, the greatest of

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