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£ 8. d. ... 22 10 ... 16 12 0 ... 17 14 0 ... 1 2 0 ... 6 0 71

21st-Offertory ...
March 1st-Offertory ..
April 6th-Offertory ...
May 2nd-Rev. T. A. Preston's House Box

Box for Lent Term
May 9th-Offertory ... ... ...
June 6th-Offertory
July 14th-Offertory ...
July 29th-Offertory ....

Dr. Fergus - Additional to ditto

Master (box in old Chapel) Sept. 22nd-Offertory ...

Box for Summer Term ... Nov. 14th-Offertory ... Dec. 1st-H. T. Grummitt (subscription) Dec. 19th-Box for Winter Term Dec. 21st-Offertory ...

Additional to ditto ...

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£219 19 51

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E. C. Ouvry, Esq. ... ... ... ... 0 5 0
B. B. Middleton, Esq. ... ... 0 10 0
Collected by W. H. E. Worship, Esq. 2 2 6
C. H, Brancker, Esq.

1 1 0
S. Swann, Esq.... ... ... ... ... 1 0 0
W. P. Sellick, Esq. ... ... ... ... 2 0 0
R. G. Brown, Esq. ... ... ... ... 1 1
H. S. Moore, Esq. ... ... ... ... 0 10 0

15 96 Per the Treasurer (the Rev. W. Almack,

Bruce Castle, Tottenham)
Lieutenant Norris, sub., 1885 ... 1 0 0
The Rev. H. Bell, sub., 1884 ... 1 0 0
W. C. Stunt, Esq., sub., 1885... ... 3 3 0
Ch. Mayhew, Esq. ... ... ... ... 0 5 6
The Rev. E. G. Wyld ...
The Rev. R. Blakiston, subs., 1885 1
The Rev. R. B. Forrester subs., 1885 1 1 0

1886
H. M. Leaf, Esq. ... ... ... ...
C, L. Bell, Esq.... ....
St. Mary's Guild, per Miss Cod
The Rev. W. Lock ... ...
T. T. Ward, Esq. ... ...
C. L. Wilson and Co. "...
Per the Rev. E. F. N. Smith
(Small sums)

3 1 0 The Rev. E. F. N. Smith

1 19 0 S. E. Waller, Esq. ... ...

0 10 0 W.J. Harrison, Esq. ...

1 1 0 W. B. Canning, Esq. ...

1 1 0 J. T. Dickinson, Esq. H. G. Madan, Esq , ...

5 0 0 The Rev. H. J. Lomax ...

1 1 H.C. ... ... ...

.....
...

...
***

... ... 0 6 0
The Rev. S. F. Bridge ...
A. Digby, Esq. ... ...
Professor $. H. Butcher ... ...
L. M. Curtler, Esq. .. ... ...
W.J. ...
The Rev. W. W. Howard

1 1 0 The Dean of Westminster, sub. ... 1 1 0

don

1 0 Mrs. Bradley, sub. ... ... ..

10 6 Mrs. Morgan Yeatman ... .

0 10
Miss Penrhyn ... ... ... ...
A. W. Yeatman, Esq. ... ...
Mortimer Rooke, Esq. ... ...
F. Madan, Esq. ... ... ... ... ...
The Rev. E. H. C. Stephenson ...
The Rev. J. S. Tyacke ... ...
E Mitchison, Esq. ... ... ...
Offertory at Marlborough Mission...
Sacred concert at do. ...
H. H. Baber, Esq. ... ... ... ...
C. V. Boys, Esq. ...

... 1 1 0
T. II. Carson, Esq. (2nd don.)
Miss Molesworth (2nd don.) ...
Rev. C. R. Carr (2nd don.) ...
C. W. Pill, Esq. ... ... ...
R. L. Hesketh, Esq.... ... ...
L. R. Furneaux, Esq.
G. Lawson, Esq. .... ... .. ... 3 3 0
W. W. Dayman, Esq,

1 1 0

1884. EXPENDITURE.

£ 8. d. Feb. 12th-Perkins (printing) ...

... 19 6 March 31st-Curate's stipend ...

... 37 10 0 May 5th-Cemetery subscription

... 0 100 July 28th-Curate's stipend ...

... 37 Oct. 6th-Curate's stipend

10 0 Dec. 21st-Savernake Hospital...

15 0 St. Mary's Parish ...

... 4 4 0 St. Peter's Parish ...

... 4 4 0 Preshute Parish ...

... 4 4 0 Curate's stipend ...

... 37 10 0 S.P.G. (subscription per Dr. Fergus) 15 15 0

196 1 6 Balance ... ... ... 23 17 111

£219 19 51

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M. H. GOULD, Hon. Treasurer.

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SCHOOL PRIZES.
Fisher Prize-G. S. Curtis
Vth Form Poetry Prize-F. J. Poynton.

Hon. Men. A: W. Roberts, and L. W. Browne.
IVth Form Poetry Prize-R. P. Mahaffy.
Lower School Poetry Prize-G. R. Pridham.
Fifth Form Latin Prose Prize-C. R. MacVicar.

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HONOURS. Arthur Swinton Weatherhead, Scholarship at King's College, Cambridge.

John Francis Wills Little, a Price Exhibition at King's College, Cambridge.

Francis Erskine Rowe, Major Scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge.

Andrew Claude De la Chievis Crommelin, Major Scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge.

John James Guest, Exhibition at Trinity College, Cambridge.

Percy John Frederick Macaulay, Open Nomination at Woolwich.

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ERRATUM. In the article on Matthew Arnold in our last number, for “hills and towns of the Lake country, read “hills and tarns of the Lake country.'

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| Printed by Chas. Perkins, at his General Printing Onice,

High-Street, Marlborough.

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CHARLES DICKENS. There is hardly any other English author who has won such world-wide reputation, and has at the same time met with so much unfavourable criticism as Charles Dickens. Englishmen and Englishwomen are never tired of revelling in the mingled humour and pathos of his writings; critics are never tired of pointing out the innumerable defects and faults that disfigure them as works of art. It is our purpose in this short paper to attempt to point out what are the qualities which have won him this universal love and admiration, and at the same time what are the deficiencies which cause his books to fall so far below the ideal standard of novel writing.

It will be necessary to give a very brief sketch of Dickens' early life, because this bears in a peculiar manner upon the development of his genius. He was born in 1812, and from 1816 to 1821, lived with his family in the military town of Chatham. Here he acquired a lasting affection for his home and the neighbouring sleepy old town of Rochester, and the lanes and woods, and wide lonely marshes, which form such a conspicuous part of the scenery of that part of Kent. Again and again he recurs in his novels to the home of his childhood, especially in Pickwick, and in Great Expectations. At the age of

ten his troubles began. His father, who appears to have resembled the immortal Micawber, moved to London. He was unsuccessful, was compelled to become an inmate of the Marshalsea, while the unfortunate Charles was put into Messrs. Warren's blacking factory. The story of this part of his life has been told in David Copperfield. He loathed his work and the company into which it threw him with a bitter loathing which he never forgot. But it was during this terrible time that he became acquainted with the miseries of low life in London, which he afterwards depicted so faithfully. Mr. Dickens' affairs amended after a time, and Charles was sent to school for two or three years. Then, after an interval, during which he was engaged as a reporter for the daily press, he began his brilliant career as an author with the Sketches by Box, published in the Evening Chronicle during 1834.

He first showed what he was really made of in The Pickwick Papers, which has always been one of his most popular works. This was followed by Oliver Twist, his first attempt at a regularly constructed novel, and by many others in quick succession.

Dickens is essentially a novelist of the middle and lower classes ; in this fact lies the source both of

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, 21st-Offertory ... March 1st-Offertory ... April 6th-Offertory May 2nd-Rev. T. A. Preston's House Box

Box for Lent Term May 9th-Offertory ...

... ... June oth-Offertory ...

... July 14th-Offertory ... July 29th-Offertory ... , Dr. Fergus - Additional to ditto

Master (box in old Chapel) Sept. 22nd-Offertory ... ...

, Box for Summer Term ... Nov. 14th-Offertory ... Dec. 1st-H. T. Grummitt (subscription) Dec. 19th-Box for Winter Term Dec. 21st-Offertory ...

Additional to ditto ...

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£ 8. d.

E. C. Ouvry, Esq. ... ... ... ... 0 5 0
B. B. Middleton, Esq.
Collected by W. H. E. Worship, Esq.
C. H, Brancker, Esq.
S. Swann, Esq.... ... ... ... ... 1 0 0
W. P. Sellick, Esq. ... ... ... ... 2 0 0
R. G: Brown, Esq. ... ... ... ... 1 1 0
H. S. Moore, Esq. ... ...

... ... 0 10 0

- 15 96 Per the Treasurer (the Rev. W. Almack,

Bruce Castle, Tottenham)-
Lieutenant Norris, sub., 1885 ... 1 0 0
The Rev. H. Bell, sub., 1884 ... 1 0 0
W. C. Stunt, Esq., sub., 1885... ... 3 3 0
Ch. Mayhew, Esq. ... ... ... ... 0 5
The Rev. E. G. Wyld ... ... ... 1 0 0
The Rev. R. Blakiston, subs., 1885 1 1 0
The Rev. R. B. Forrester subs., 1885 1 1 0

1886 1 1 0
H. M. Leaf, Esq. ... ... ... ... 5
C. L. Bell, Esq.... ... ...

0 10 6
St. Mary's Guild, per Miss Cook ... 12 00
The Rev. W. Lock ... ... ... 5 0 0
T. T. Ward, Esq. ... ... ...
C. L. Wilson and Co. ..

2 2 0 Per the Rev. E. F. N. Smith

(Small sums) ... The Rev. E. F. N. Smith

1 19
S. E. Waller, Esq. ... ...
W.J. Harrison, Esq. ...
W. B. Canning, Esq.
J. T. Dickinson, Esq. ...
H. G. Madan, Esq , ... ...
The Rev. H. J. Lomax ....
H.O. ... ..
The Rev. S. F. Bridge ...
A. Digby, Esq. ... ... ... ...
Professor S. Ã. Butcher... ...
L. M. Curtler, Esq. . ... ...
W.J.

. ... .. . ... 3 0 0
The Rev. W. W. Howard
The Dean of Westminster, sub.

don. ... 1 1 0
Mrs. Bradley, sub. ... ... ...
Mrs. Morgan Yeatman ... ...
Miss Penrhyn ... ... ... ... 0 10 0
A. W. Yeatman, Esq. ... ...

... ... 0 10 0
Mortimer Rooke, Esq. ... ...
F. Madan, Esq....

2 2 0
The Rev. E. H. C. Stephenson ...
The Rev. J. S. Tyacke ... ...
E. Mitchison, Esq. ... ... ...
Offertory at Marlborough Mission...
Sacred concert at do. ...
H. H. Baber, Esq. ... ... ...
C. V. Boys, Esq. ... ..
T. H. Carson, Esq. (2nd don.)
Miss Molesworth (2nd don.) ...
Rev. C. R. Carr (2nd don.)
C. W. Pill, Esq. ... ...
R. L. Hesketh, Esq.... ...
L. R. Furpeaux, Esq. ...
G. Lawson, Esq. ... ...
W. W. Dayman, Esq, ...
Editors of Marllurian ...

... 3 0 0

- 160 16 6

1884.

EXPENDITURE. Feb. 12th-Perkins (printing) ...

... 1 96 March 31st-Curate's stipend ...

... 37 10 0 May 5th-Cemetery subscription

0 10 0 July 28th-Curate's stipend ...

10 0 Oct. 6th-Curate's stipend ...

100 Dec. 21st-Savernake Hospital...

15 16 0 St. Mary's Parish ...

... 4 4 0 St. Peter's Parish ... Preshute Parish ...

... 4 40 Curate's stipend ...

... 37 10 0 S.P.G. (subscription per Dr. Fergus) 15 15 0

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SCHOOL PRIZES.
Fisher Prize-G. S. Curtis
Vth Form Poetry Prize-F. J. Poynton.

Hon. Men. A: W. Roberts, and L. W. Browne. IV th Form Poetry Prize-R. P. Mahaffy. Lower School Poetry Prize-G. R. Pridham. Fifth Form Latin Prose Prize—C. R. MacVicar.

HONOURS. Arthur Swinton Weatherhead, Scholarship at King's College, Cambridge.

John Francis Wills Little, a Price Exhibition at King's College, Cambridge.

Francis Erskine Rowe, Major Scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge.

Andrew Claude De la Chievis Crommelin, Major Scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge.

John James Guest, Exhibition at Trinity College, Cambridge.

Percy John Frederick Macaulay, Open Nomination at Woolwich.

£292 6 0

ERRATUM. In the article on Matthew Arnold in our last number, for “hills and towns of the Lake country; read “hills and tarns of the Lake country.

MARLBOROUGH MISSION ACCOUNTS, 1884. 1884. RECEIPTS.

£ 8. d. January 1st-Balance in band ... ... ... 14 1 45

W.C. Stuut, Esq.

li Printed by Chas. Perkins, at his General Printing Office,

High-Street, Marlborough.

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CHARLES DICKENS. There is hardly any other English author who has won such world-wide reputation, and has at the same time met with so much unfavourable criticism as Charles Dickens. Englishmen and Englishwomen are never tired of revelling in the mingled humour and pathos of his writings; critics are never tired of pointing out the innumerable defects and faults that disfigure them as works of art. It is our purpose in this short paper to attempt to point out what are the qualities which have won him this universal love and admiration, and at the same time what are the deficiencies which cause his books to fall so far below the ideal standard of novel writing.

It will be necessary to give a very brief sketch of Dickens' early life, because this bears in a peculiar manner upon the development of his genius. He was born in 1812, and from 1816 to 1821, lived with his family in the military town of Chatham. Here he acquired a lasting affection for his home and the neighbouring sleepy old town of Rochester, and the lanes and woods, and wide lonely marshes, which form such a conspicuous part of the scenery of that part of Kent. Again and again he recurs in his novels to the home of his childhood, especially in Pickwick, and in Great Expectations. At the age of

ten his troubles began. His father, who appears to have resembled the immortal Micawber, moved to London. He was unsuccessful, was compelled to become an inmate of the Marshalsea, while the unfortunate Charles was put into Messrs. Warren's blacking factory. The story of this part of his life has been told in David Copperfield. He loathed his work and the company into which it threw him with a bitter loathing which he never forgot. But it was during this terrible time that he became acquainted with the miseries of low life in London, which he afterwards depicted so faithfully. Mr. Dickens' affairs amended after a time, and Charles was sent to school for two or three years. Then, after an interval, during which he was engaged as a reporter for the daily press, he began his brilliant career as an author with the Sketches by Boz, published in the Evening Chronicle during 1834.

He first showed what he was really made of in The Pickwick Papers, which has always been one of his most popular works. This was followed by Oliver Twist, his first attempt at a regularly constructed novel, and by many others in quick succession.

Dickens is essentially a novelist of the middle and lower classes ; in this fact lies the source both of

his strength and his weakness. He has painted | ble as are his characters, numbers of them are to us with a master's brush, the sin and misery, the joys ll as to him real living beings. In spite of the exag. and sorrows of the vast masses which inhabit our gerated way in which they are drawn, we can great towns. Himself one of the people, he wrote scarcely conceive of them as being mere figments of of the people and for the people. His great aim the artist's brain. Many of them are become housewas to depict the struggle of what is natural in hold words among us; Sam Weller, Mrs. Gamp, man with what is artificial and conventional. He Pecksniff, Dick Swiveller The Marchioness will finds nature in all sorts of unexpected places, often live as long as the English language lives. Sam mingled with much that is evil and repulsive. He Weller and his father serve as admirable illustra. finds it in little Nell, moving in her childish inno tions of Dickens' peculiar type of broad vigorous cence unharmed through the sin and coarseness that humour, often with a strong farcical element in it. surround her on every side; he finds it again, Dickens' imagination was very powerful, often almost crushed out by drink and brutality, in the indeed it carried him to lengths which to us appear poor drab, whose faithful love for Bill Sikes is fanciful. When a villain, a Jonas Chuzzlewit or a requited by cruelty such as we shudder to read of, Bill Sikes is about his deeds of darkness, the very or in the unhappy drudge of a Yorkshire school, or rain and wind seem to fall in with his mood, and in countless other beings whose lives have been every passing event appears to allude to what is in spent under the most baneful influences. In the his mind. At such momentous crises this is same spirit Dickens strove against every form of very well, and serves to keep up the interest, bat oppression; against the poor laws in Oliver Twist, when the same style of writing is used in the de. against circumlocution and red tapeism in Little scription of mere common-place events, such as Tom Dorrit; and many are the now happily obsolete Pinch's journey to London on a stage-coach, it characters, such as Mr. Squeers and Mrs. Gamp, cannot but be a little forced and unnaturalwhose extinction is in great part due to the liberrima Another remarkable trait in Dickens is his pathos. indignatio of this powerful writer and earnest At times, it is true, this is a little maudlin, just as reformer. Are we then to class Dickens with that his humour is at times a little broad or far-fetched, school of French novelists who consistently repre yet there is often a very genuine ring about it. sent all that is good in men as being in perpetual Great as were Dickens' talents and much as we conflict with the ordinances of society ? Surely he must admire his genius, yet it cannot be denied that has very little in common with these ? The answer for us of the 'superior social section,' who lay some is not far to seek. One of the strongest of our perhaps not unjust claim to the 'finer sense of the national characteristics has always been what Mr. city,' there is something in which he seems to fall Arnold calls the "sentiment of conduct. This is short of our standards. We cannot impute it to our great safeguard against those offences against him as a fault; doubtless it was the natural result social order and decorum which are so frequent in of the circumstances of his up-bringing, and if this writers of this school. This sentiment Dickens had been otherwise, much of his special force might possessed in a very high degree. He is indeed a have been lost. Yet the fact remains that he is very typical Englishman. A strong element in his entirely out of sympathy with the intellectual and nature was that innate conservatism which is often artistic interests which form so large a part of to be found in many who are to the world radicals, modern life, that he is, in a word, an utter Philistine. such as he was. Never is he more at home, than Viewed by our criteria there is much in him which when describing the festivities of a real old English

is altogether untrue and unnatural. His humorous Christmas ; again, he obviously looks with a tender characters are painfully exaggerated, he labels the regret on the days of postboys and coaches, of with a few distinctive phrases, very amusing, very ostlers and bagmen, which the march of modern humorous, but recurring again and again almost civilisation has swept away.

ad nauseam. All his men and women are so oneThe two qualities most strongly developed in sided; they are mere embodiments of one single Dickens are an extremely vivid imagination and a idea ; there is no light and shade in them; Mark - somewhat loud and rollicking humour. Innumera. | Tapley asserts his jo!liness' in every so

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