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BY LILLIAS CAMPBELL DAVIDSON.

of complete toleration, in the story of soup to poor old Widow Reynolds, the devoted labors of Elizabeth Fry, and we walked, — well, as close toand in the echo of the stately eloquence gether as people might be excused for of Bright. It may be said that Fox's doing, under the circumstances. We successors were greater than himself ; had such a lot to talk about !.

the day and no doubt they possessed gifts, as we first met, just two months ago, at they possessed opportunities, which the regimental sports, and how Harry were denied to him ; but they could not fell in love at first sight - or so he one of them have done his work. Car- vowed — and felt like knocking down lyle could find for him, in all history, Captain Trevor when he reached me but one peer, the philosopher Diogenes. first with a strawberry ice, and ran for “Great, truly, was that Tub; a temple the cream for my tea. I felt rather from which man's dignity and divinity grieved, after this, to confess that I were scornfully preached abroad; but hadn't noticed Harry a bit that day ; greater is the Leather Hull, for the and it was only after Mrs. Jacob's same sermon was preached there, and tennis, ten days later, when he walked not in Scorn but in Love."

home with me, and carried my racquet and shoes, that I had first began to think — to wonder — to — well,

mind! From Temple Bar. The clouds had gathered thicker and THE DEVIL'S OWN.

blacker as we reached Mrs. Reynolds's

moss-grown, thatched cottage, and we To every life there comes its con- were barely inside when the big drops summation of bliss

the very crown- began to patter down. Privately, I iug and pinnacle of well-being ; looking don't think Mrs. Reynolds felt all the back at which, 'twixt smiles and tears, regret she expressed at our being we say, with yearning and regretful caught in a summer shower, for she heart, Ah! then, at least, for how- dearly loved a little gossip, and seldom ever brief a space, I was perfectly had a chance to indulge her tastes in happy.”

this lonely locality, where the carrier That consummation was mine one only passed twice a week, and her radiant day in June, as I walked over nearest neighbor lived a mile away, the springing heather on Aulus Moor across a very unsafe ford. with Harry Curzon.

I had to answer no end of inquiries For we had been engaged three days as to the physical well-being of all my - three golden days suatched from family and relatives to the remotest deParadise ; but it was only the night gree, and tell her six distinct times before that my dear old father gave his that I was quite free, myself, from all careful consent, and this was our very bodily infirmity, before she was content first walk together as openly declared to let the conversation take a more loyers.

general character. What a walk it was ! Far off, be- 66 Aud how's the new housemaid yond the verge of farthest moorland, doin'?” was her next question, after I the burnished line of sea gleamed like had succeeded in artfully leading her a band of molten gold. Overhead, the from more personal topics, in dread piled-up banks of cloud had a lining of lest she should begin researches of an lurid pink, and hung heavily against embarrassing nature into Harry's and their background of liquid blue. There my

relations towards each other. was a storm coming ; but what is a “ Doin' well, is she?

Well, well thunder-storm when you've just prom. I'm main glad to hear it. I must say I ised to marry the man you love with never much expected it. Laws,' says all your whole heart ?

I, what can you look for in a wench Harry carried the basket. I was named Pinnick ?' Butter don't come taking some of mamma's famous lentill from lard — now do it ?

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Perhaps not,” said I, not wishing thatched cottages as stood just inside to commit myself over what the Jews Camp, a mile or more from seemed an evident enough proposition. here - you may see the pile of ruins • But Pinnick isn't such a bad name, now.

I wouldn't have lived in a dree Mrs. Reynolds — not very pretty, per- spot like that, let alone Pinnicks for haps ; but that doesn't much matter." neighbors in the other house, only pov

“ Matter ? Not a farthing, miss, as erty sends strange bedfellows, as the to beauty ; but a deal of matter other sayin' is, and the rent was low. Noways. Never did I know a Pinnick body had a good word for they Pinthat hadn't a bad strain. There was nicks, and I kept myself to myself, for Job Pinnick, the sheep-stealer, as was there was strange tales afloat. Folks hanged on the moor here by the head- said as there'd been a child by a marstone cross when I was a gell; and riage afore — she was a widow when Hannah Copley, as

a Pinnick Seth Pinnick married her - fine before she married, and poisoned her likely little chap as died strange, somehusband after; and them two Pinnicks how; and folks fought shy of Pinnick, as lived neighbors to me at the Jews' as was a surly brute, and hedged and Camp, and sold theyselves to the Old ditched for Squire Berthon. Well,

they did me no harm, and I'd lived “Really !” said Harry, who, perched there three months or more, quiet on a rush-bottomed chair, and holding enough, but for the shrieks and cries his hat in that attitude of instant de- when Seth came home o' Saturday parture peculiar to the morning caller, nights from the Doncaster Arms, and had hitherto been engaged in medita- had it out o' her after, when all at once tive study of the mourning cards with the black death broke out in the houses which the cottage walls were lavishly down by the stagnant pool betwixt this decorated ; " that was a mild thing to and Aulus' ford, and the place was in a do. What price did they get — any- panic. Seth Pinnick had been drinkthing worth while ?"

ing with some of they men from down The widow Reynolds declined to there, and the next thing was, he and treat the subject with any levity. Sally was both down with it too. · Miss

“The gentleman may believe me, or Kitty, there wasn't a soul as would go he may not believe me,” she remarked, anigh their cottage ; and I thinks, with deep solemnity. " What I went thinks I, “I'm a lone woman, and a through and experienced myself I neighbor ; and if the Almighty means must hold with, was it never

me die, I'll get it as soon livin' next Which I'll tell you, Miss Kitty,” she door as a-tending them ; ' so I went in went on, turning her look of reproach and nursed 'em both. from Harry to me. “And your own

Laws, my dear! it was as bad a father as is a reverend can tell you as time as ever I did see ! Both of 'em I told the tale to him the very same was ravin' out of their heads when I thirty years ago come Martinmas — the got in, and not a bit or drop in the year it took place, when both of us was house, nor a soul to help one. My a deal younger than to-day.'

niece Eliza promised to come up every I'm afraid I did not hail the relation day to the headstone cross and bring with any wild joy ; but that appeared me a basket of bread and such-like, but to matter little to Mrs. Reynolds, whose save for that I didn't see a livin' soul. cap frills rose and fell as her head Less 'n two days Seth died - he was began to waggle to and fro, in the ex- aʼmost past speech when I went in — citement of her parration.

but he shrieked wild-like without stop“It was thirty year this midsummer, pin' till his breath was well-nigh out of and I hadn't long been a widow of my him, and all his strength. Mercy on first, poor Joe Bowers, as likely a lad us ! it chilled my blood !- and that as ever walked at the plough-tail. I night I saw Sally was goin' too. I'll was a-livin' then in one of them two I never forget that night till my own

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death-bed comes ! There was a storm | but my haud shook so it dropped from outside rain and thunder, and wind it, and fell on the open Book instead. enough to lift the roof; and there that I just saw as how it was a Jew's penny, poor sinful woman lay, ravin' and mut- and not a real shillin' at all, when terin' and singin' – enough to turn you there came the most terrible clap of cold !

thunder as ever I heard — and a flash “I got the Book, and I sat by the as filled the room. There was a roar chimney-corner, and I tried to read of bricks fallin', and timbers givin', but I couldn't see a line. I was well- and a smell of burnin' and sulphur. nigh frightened silly, what with the Sally Pinnick gave one great cry, and storm and Sally. All at once, about fell back dead on the pillow; and as midnight, she fell quite still and hushed ; for me, I just tore out o' the house,

l and then all at once she began to speak and ran through the rain and the blast out strong and clear.

to Dewsbury, three mile or more away. " Miss Kitty, the words seemed to I was drenched and tore and sore bepass me in my dread, but as sure as I mired as ever I got there ; but there I sit here I made out, while my teeth found shelter and a roof with my niece chattered, and I shook so I nearly Elizabeth. And betimes, next morn, I dropped the rushlight, a tale that struck was ashamed o' my fears, in the sunme dumb with horror. It was all about light, and I fared back to do the last

child — a little lad — and as how for the poor dead creature, and see to Squire Berthon swore he'd have no my own empty house. Will you bechildren in them cottages to harry the lieve, Miss Kitty, I found the place a game ; and as how Seth came home heap o' bricks and timbers ? They said and told her as he wasn't a-goin' to the lightning had struck the roof, and lose a good place for a brat's sake, and the gale did the rest ; but anyhow, I there'd be a way to settle. Then there made way to creep to poor Sally's deathcame something about starving, and a room, and that was not so rent as the strong lad, long to die that way, and rest. Only the bed, and she in it, lay Seth in a temper, and out of patience piled with bricks from the chimney, to wait - and a black mark round a that you couldn't see it. Yet,' thinks thin little neck — and how he'd bound I, she laid a charge on me with her her by a Jew's shillin' never to tell. last words, and I'll keep it;' so I Miss Kitty, my child ! I fair turned sought for that Jew's penny high and sick with fright. Not for a hundred low. They're real siller, I heard Squire pounds would I have stopped a minute Berthon's lady say once, and worth a longer in that room ! I got up to turn mint; but though I moved the sticks, and fly, never heedin' the storm and and lifted the ag carpet - ay, and the wind - anywhere out of that place swept out the room, and even scoured of blood ! But just as I stood up out o'it; and peered into every chink and my chair, as it might be just so as I'm cranny- - not a sign of that bit o' money doing now, Sally flung out her hand saw I from that day to this. No, Miss and clutched tight hold on my gown, Kitty, nor ever shall ; for if ever the and sat up sudden, strong and straight, Old One claimed his own, he came and with her eyes wide open. Mrs. Bow- fetched away the shillin' she bound ers,' she says, wild-like, “you're a good her soul by, that blessed midsummer woman, I doubt. Take this shillin',

night.” and she reached one from under her " But what did you do for a house, pillow — and give it to lame Billy Mrs. Reynolds ? " I murmured, when when I'm gone. He begged at my my lips could find their use. 66 Yours door last Easter-tide, and I drove him was ruined too, wasn't it ?" with a curse,' she says, and now I'm “Eh, I bid with my niece Elizabeth sorry,' says she, “and I'd like to do till Reynolds asked me, and then I one good deed afore I die.' And with came out here. No more o' the Jews' that she reached me out the shillin', 'Camp for me, Miss Kitty! But just

LIVING AGE. VOL. LXXXIV. 4330

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you tell the mistress at the rectory not, but the ones here are still found, from to put too much faith in a Pinnick, my time to time, and always there has been dear, and to count the knobs of sugar some horrible story connected withi now and again.'

every one that sees the light. My Odd,” said Harry, when we were father says it is the large number of once more ou our way over the moor- Roman coins found about Dewcaster land, where every sprig of heather now that gave rise to the legend ; like glistened with its diamond drop, and Onion's pennies at Silchester. But the the hot sun was drawing up a quivering poor people believe it firmly, and say mist from the soaked earth — "odd that the real names of the places about what a lot of superstition still lingers are Judasbury, and Judas-camp, or the about in country districts. Rum little Jews' Camp. It's very odd, Harry. story, wasn't it, Kitty ? I didn't dare And here's the camp itself.” catch your eye, for fear of laughing." “A gruesome hole,” said Harry.

Laughing ?” — I gave a little shud- And certainly the square depression on der —“I thought it perfectly awful. the barren hilltop, without a tree to And a Jew's penny,

it

How break the wide brown sea of moor, was very strange. One could almost be- desolate and wild enough for any tale lieve there's something in it, after all.” | of tragedy. The pile of grass-grown “Something in what ? ”

ruins that still marked the scene of “Oh, the old legend about the Jews' Mrs. Reynolds's story lay under the Camp. Did you never hear it? Why, shadow of tangled gorse and broom. you know there's a Roman camp here We strolled across the weird enclosure, - you'll see it in another minute - to see how the little spring, swollen by Dewcaster its real name is ; but all the the heavy rain, had burst its banks and country people call it the Jews' Camp, torn a channel through the ground beand papa says the corrupted name low. There had been a sort of miniagave rise to the story. Any way, the ture landslip, and the fresh wet earth legend runs that when the Romans was upturned for several yards. As I under Aulus Plautius conquered this stood talking to Harry I wondered place, there was a soldier of the legion what was the strange round object I who had taken part in the sacking of idly turned over with the toe of my Jerusalem and got, as part of his booty, shoe. Suddenly I stooped, and picked the thirty pieces of silver, which had it up. been ever since in the family of the " There !” I said ; why that's one man who sold the Potter's Field. They of the very coins I was telling you say that money is the devil's own, and about. Papa says they’re as plentiful whoever possesses it is ruined, body as blackberries.” And I held it out to and soul. The soldier who had it was Harry as I spoke. murdered by his comrades for his Jove, so it is !” said he.

66 That's hoard, and with it they bribed their fel- queer.” He rubbed it on his coatlow warriors to kill their own centurion sleeve, and stuck knowingly in his eye in battle, and place one of themselves the little magnifying glass he examines in his stead. He turned on his confed- nowers through. " It's a genuine anerates, once he was in power, and tique. I can just make out Ti Cæsar. would have put them to death, but they I believe you've had a real find, Kits, fled, carrying the money with them; and the first thing you ever gave me is

; and finally returned with an army of really worth having. I'll put it on my British, and enough of the pieces of watch-chain, and wear it as long as I silver still unsquandered to buy from a live — your first, dear little present.” traitor inside the camp its betrayal, and “Oh, Harry! you mustn't — please the slaughter of all its defenders. The don't. Suppose it were to be a Jew's other pieces were melted down, or penny !” passed into other circulation, still carry

“ You dear little goose ! ing the curse with them to this day ; ' really a superstitious kitten?

Is our

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future household to be conducted on | could I ever have said such a thing! non-Friday principles, and are all our How could I be such a brute ! I don't dinner-parties to collapse if there's a know what possessed me. fear of our sitting down thirteen to forgive me, my own little love." table ? Oh, Kitty! Never mind, even Of course I forgave him, and we a Jew's penny would bring good luck if walked on over the moor hand-in-hanıl, it came from you; and wild horses talking gently and tenderly at first, shan't tear from me your very first gift. though by and by Harry began to grow You never gave me a single thing be- silent and abstracted. It was very unfore - except your darling self, and like Harry as unlike him as his that sweet something last night at the sudden burst of temper-he had the garden gate. I've given you dozens gayest, sunniest spirits, and a mood and a ring — but you never gave me that was generally unruffled and sebut that one, and refused me that rose

But I knew men have often I begged for from your gown at Mrs. things to worry them that we girls Jacob's tennis-fight. Kitty, give me know nothing of ; and I knew too that your little hand.

One ring looks too beginning to bother him now was not meagre there — let me get the other the way to make him a good wife by one, and put it on to make it look bal- and by. So I said nothing, and was anced.”

only very kind to him when we parted, “Nonsenşe, Harry!" I blushed to show him that my silence had not violently, and tried to snatch my fin- been resentment. gers away, but he held them fast. I thought he would have walked over “What rubbish to say such things ! from Dewsbury the next day ; but it That needn't be talked about for was Friday before I saw him swing ages."

open the little gate into the meadow, Ages! the days are ages — what and come up the side path under the on earth have we to wait for ? Thank perfumed lime-blossoms. He looked fortune I'm not a beggar, and you pale and rather worried, and I anxwon't mind a sub for a husband, will iously asked if there were anything you, darling ? I haven't any people amiss, when our first greetings were for you to be introduced to, and you over. don't need any gown but that you play “I think I must have caught a chill tennis in — I'd like you to wear that that day on the moor,” he said. “I always. When will you wear it to be haven't felt quite myself ever since. married in, Kits ? Next Tuesday ? I'm restless and out of sorts altogether come, dear, say which day.'

somehow, and feel as if there were a “ Harry !” I cried, startled and hor- weight on me that I can't shake off. rified, “don't be so silly. It isn't time Fancy my being such a duffer, when I. to talk of that yet — indeed, it isn't. ought to be the happiest fellow in the You mustn't be so peremptory. You whole world ! But somehow I can't never talked like this before."

help it, Kitty." “Peremptory !" He spoke quite Before he went away he showed me shortly. “I don't believe you under the Roman coin, cleaned and burstand. I don't want any waiting, what- nished, and hanging on his watch-chain ever you may do. I don't believe you beside the new sixpence he wore there love me as I do you, or you couldn't for a joke — “for luck,” he always even talk of it. That isn't love worth said. having."

"It's really a good coin, Kitten,” he " Oh, Harry ! was all I could say, said . one of Tiberius's, and in capand the tears sprang to my eyes.

ital condition. How about the Jew's In an instant his arms were round penny, eh, little girl ?me, and he was begging me to forgive “No," I said, “ I know it isn't. I him.

asked papa, and he told me all about “Good heavens !” he said, “how it; and though it's commonly supposed

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