A Probable Italian Source of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar,"

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New York University, 1913 - 130 pagina's
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"I intend ... to demonstrate the probability of Shakespeare's indebtedness in the compostion of the first three acts of this 'Julius Caesar', to the 'Cesare' of Orlando Pescetti ... first published at Verona in 1594."--Introd.

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Populaire passages

Pagina 94 - To beg the voice and utterance of my tongue) A curse shall light upon the limbs of men; Domestic fury and fierce civil strife Shall cumber all the parts of Italy...
Pagina 78 - I cannot tell what you and other men Think of this life, but, for my single self, I had as lief not be as live to be In awe of such a thing as I myself.
Pagina 60 - Would he were fatter! but I fear him not: Yet if my name were liable to fear, I do not know the man I should avoid So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much; He is a great observer, and he looks Quite through the deeds of men; he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music...
Pagina 12 - And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.
Pagina 67 - Cowards die many times before their deaths ; The valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, It seems to me most strange that men should fear ; 35 Seeing that death, a necessary end, Will come when it will come.
Pagina 14 - But yesterday the word of Caesar might Have stood against the world : now lies he there, And none so poor to do him reverence.
Pagina 16 - O, what a fall was there, my countrymen ! Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O, now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity : these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded?
Pagina 94 - Havoc, and let slip the dogs of war; That this foul deed shall smell above the earth With carrion men, groaning for burial.
Pagina 42 - Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers, Caius. We all stand up against the spirit of Caesar, And in the spirit of men there is no blood ; O, that we then could come by Caesar's spirit, And not dismember Caesar ! But, alas, Caesar must bleed for it ! And, gentle friends, Let's kill him boldly, but not wrathfully ; Let's carve him as a dish fit for the gods, Not hew him as a carcass fit for hounds...
Pagina 27 - In the most high and palmy state of Rome, A little ere the mightiest Julius fell, The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets...

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