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946 UPON THE SECOND EPISTLE TO THE THESSALONIANS. [CHAP. III.

their hearts and establisheth it. But the peace of the heart and quietness of mind passeth all understanding. The power, and wisdom, and strength, and riches of all the world are not able to make it. It is the glory of God, that he alone is the God of peace.

I pray for you that nothing may be done among you to the hindrance of peace, but that it abide with you always; not for a while, not in prosperity only, but in persecution, in your death, and for ever. If God be with you, you shall have peace.

And if

you

love one another and keep his word, God will come to you, and love you, and abide with you, and give you the comfort of his peace.

“ The salutation of me Paul.” He gave them warning before of false apostles who came in his name, and pretended his word or his letter; therefore now telleth them, how they shall know certainly whether such epistles as they receive be his, written or sent by him. In every epistle that I send, saith he, to the churches, or to any the brethren, I writel mine? own name, and send this greeting written with mine own hand, which now I send to you all :

“ The grace of our Lord
Jesus Christ be with
you all. Amen."

FINIS.

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SERMONS

BY

BISHOP JE W E L.

A
S E R M ON

RM Ο Ν
Made in Latine

in OXENFORD,

In the raigne of King Edward the sixt, by the learned and godly Father Iohn Ievvel, late Bishop

of Sarisburie :

And translated into English

by R. V.

Dedicated vnto the Bishop of London, as appeareth

in the Comentary of Master Calvine

upon the Galathians, in English'.

1. Cor. 9. 16.
Wo is unto me if I preach not the Gospell.

LONDON,
Printed by Iohn Norton,
Printer to the Kings most ex-

cellent Maiestie.

1611.

[? In the dedication prefixed to the translation of Calvin's Commentary on Galatians, dated 1581, the translator says, that "for the briefness” he passed this sermon “undedicated for a season;" but that,

inscribing the commentary to the bishop (John Aylmer), he thought it his duty, joining them together, “to dedicate both at once” to his lordship.]

MASTER DOCTOR HUMFREY IN HIS BOOK

WHICH HE WRITETH OF THE LIFE AND

DEATH OF JEWEL.

Pagina 49.

Quam autem in templo Divæ Mariæ concionem habuerit, quam Latine, quam compte, quam theologice, me silente ipsa loquetur Oratio, cujus exemplum mutilum, ut potui, aliquantulum recognitum et correctius exhibere malui, quam omnino supprimere, quæ et concionatores multa utiliter commonefacit ; et pro gradu Baccalaureatus suscepto recitata videtur, verbis ex 1 Pet. iv. desumptis, dominica intra Octav. Ascensionis.

But what manner of sermon he made in St Mary's church, in how excellent Latin he made it, how finely and how like a divine he did it, his matter shall shew, notwithstanding I hold my peace; the unperfect example whereof being, as well as I could, somewhat perused and amended, I had rather set out,

than altogether suppress it or keep it back; which profitably put-
teth in mind and warneth preachers of many things, and
seemeth to have been preached when he took
his degree of bachelor in divinity, the
words being taken out of the first

epistle of Peter, the fourth
chapter, upon the Sun-
day within the Oc-
tavois of the
Ascension.

A LEARNED AND GODLY SERMON,

MADE IN THE LATIN TONGUE,

IN ST MARY'S, IN OXENFORD,

UPON THE SUNDAY AFTER THE ASCENSION, IN THE REIGN OF KING
EDWARD THE SIXTH', BY THE FAMOUS AND EXCELLENT CLERK
MASTER JEWEL, LATE BISHOP OF SARISBURY, AND

DONE INTO ENGLISH BY R. V.?

new

I PETER IV. 11. If any man speak, let him talk as the words of God. BRETHREN beloved in Christ, I have chosen these words chiefly out of that epistle of St Peter, which are accustomed to be read unto the people this day, because that, whereas I must preach in Latin, according to the custom of this place and time, the same in mine opinion seemed to belong properly to this assembly. The which that they may be plainlier and better understood of you all, I must repeat a few words from the beginning of this whole epistle. Wherefore we must call to mind, because in those first times christian religion was shut out every where, as pernicious to men's souls, and an infection of

commonwealths, and that it seemed great godliness to root out the bringers in religion ; lest, I say, that christian men and those that were godly should in that season utterly be discouraged, and cast away all hope, St Peter doth so instruct them with this epistle, that they should consider no new or unwonted thing to have happened; that Christ himself hath suffered far bitterer and unworthier things; that they should not be faint-hearted; lastly, that the way to glory is by afflictions and crosses.

And to that purpose he warneth the people by themselves and the bishops also, what belongeth to each of them to take heed of. Concerning that which belongeth unto the people, he saith that they have spent time enough before upon wickedness, and that now they ought to change their life with their religion ; that godliness is placed, not in outward shew and titles, but in soundness of life and innocency of manners; that it is an ill thing with mouth and tongue only to worship God, and to give our mind and soul to worship the devil, and to

Latina in

Maria.

Si quis loquitur, tanquam sermones Dei, &c.* Concio Juelli DILECTISS. in Christo fratres, ex ea epistola D. Petri, quæ hodierno die ad populum legi Templo D., solet, hæc verba potissimum delegi, quod cum pro hujus loci ac temporis consuetudine Latine

esset perorandum, ea mihi ad hunc cætum proprie pertinere viderentur. Quæ ut a vobis omnibus propius et melius intelligantur, pauca mihi a principio totius epistolæ sunt repetenda. Quapropter meminisse debemus, cum primis illis temporibus Christiana religio ut pernicies animorum et rerumpub. pestis ubique gentium exploderetur, et pietas erga Deum summa esse videretur, religionis novatores extinguere; ne homines Christiani et pü ea tempestate frangerentur et spem omnem abjicerent, ita eos hac epistola D. Petrum instituere, ut meminerint nihil novum aut inusitatum accidisse, Christum ipsum longe acerbiora indignioraque pertulisse, ne quid animo conciderent, per afflictiones et cruces aditum postremo esse ad gloriam. Eoque et populum monet seorsim, et episcopos, docetque quid utrisque curæ esse debeat.

Quod ad populum attinet, ait, satis ante datum esse nequitiæ, nunc cum religione vitam quoque mutari oportere: pietatem autem non in fuco et titulis, sed in vitæ integritate ac morum innocentia, sitam esse : iniquum autem esse ore tantum et lingua Deum colere,

[? There is some doubt as to the date of this sermon. Humfrey in his life of Jewel places his exercises and degree of B. D. “anno Edouardi sexti fere quinto," i. e. 1551. But Anthony A Wood sets down Jewel as graduating in 1550. See Wood, Athen. Oxon. Lond. 1813-20. Fast. Oxon. Vol. II. cols, 120, 1.]

[? Probably Richard Vaux, or Vaulx. This per. son translated Hyperius' Common-places, and some other works. See Wood, Athen. Oxon. Fast. Oxon. Vol. I. col. 149.]

(3 Understand, Orig. ed.]

[* Reprinted from Humfrey's Life of Jewel, Lond. 1573.]

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