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blikened by Gregory to the iron y ing done, it was his manner to w on the Smith's anvil, sparkling make his young people to choose cí round about."

a certain passage in the chapter, Mr. Eliot was exemplary in and give him some observation governing as well as instructing of their own upon it. By this his children.

method he did mightily sharpThe apostle Paul, reciting and en and improve, as well as try requiring qualifications of a gos- their understandings,and endeavpel minister, gives order, that or to make them wise unto salhe be one “ that ruleth well 'his. vation. Whatever decay there own house, having his children might be of family religion in in subjection with all gravity.” the land, those who knew Mr. Mr. Eliot was very strict in the Eliot would be confident of this, education of lis children ; and that after the example of the very careful to prevent, or remedy any error in their hearts and thou liest down, and when thou risest lives. No exorbitances, or ex- up,” &c. travagances could ever find a • Now no man can imagine, that room under his roof; nor was we Christians should be under less his house any other than a school obligation to keep up the honor of of piety. In the government of

God in our families, than the Jews

were : This supposition would milihis family he avoided the ex

tate against the express injunction of tremes of great rigor, and over the apostle, “ To bring up our chil. much lerity. He was ever care- dren in the fear of God and nurture ful to maintain family religion and admonition of the Lord ;” and in its various branches, which would be contrary to the New Testa. tended to render family govern- the best Christians in all ages."

ment examples ; and the practice of ment more easy. His family « Wherefore it cannot be sufiwas a little Bethel, for the word ciently bewailed, that reading the ship of God constantly and ex- scriptures and praying in families, actly kept up in it : And to the which are parts of religious worship

so useful and necessary to the predaily prayers of the family, his inanner was to prefix the read of God among us, should be so much father of the faithful, he would sensual delights, here he was ą “ command his children, and his Boanerges, a son of thunder. household after him, that they It was another property of his should keep the way of the preaching, that there was everLord.”

serving of the knowledge and fear ing of the scriptures ;* which be

neglected.” London ministers on reading the scriptures, Sermon I.

p. * Reading the Scriptures is a

14, &c. part of religious worship to be per. However, " Low as our religious formed in families. This is a piece character is fallen in these degenerate of practical religion, which every days, I have reason to hope, that head of a family should conscien- acts of domestic worsbip are yet tiously maintain ; and would be performed by multitudes of Christians found a useful mean to instil and pro- of various denominations.: yet I mote the fear of God in our child cannot but fear, that the scriptures dren and all under our care. The are not so constantly read at such strict charge God gave the Jews, seasons, as they formerly were ; an with respect to the law remains upon omission which must be to the great record for our instruction ; (Deut. detriment both of children and servi. 6, 7, 8, 9.) “ These words, which vants. One would think, that those, I command 'thee this day, shall be who believe the divine authority of in thine heart ; and thou shalt scripture, and its infinite importance, teach them diligently unto thy chil. should be easily prevailed upon dren ; and shalt talk of them when restore this useful exercise, at least thou sittest in thine house, and when for one part of the day.” Dr. Doddthou walkest by the way, and when I ridge's Fam. Expos. vol. ii. Pref. p. 5.

more much of Christ in it: And As a preacher he made it his with Paul he could say, “I decare to give to every one his termined to know nothing but meat in due season. The food Jesus Christ;" having that bles. which he administered was sal. sed name in his discourses, with utary and nourishing. His ser- a frequency like that with which mons did not consist of vain and Paul mentions it in his epistles. empty speculations, but of the The Lord Jesus Christ was the solid and important truths of the loadstone, which gave a touch gospel. In his discourses he to all the sermons of this Chrisstudiously renounced such doc- tian minister-a glorious, pretrines as detract from the grace cious, amiable Christ was the of God in the salvation of man, point of heaven, towards which or tend to undermine, or lead they still verged. From hence men to set aside and reject any it was, that he would give that of the peculiar doctrines of the advice to young preachers ; Christian scheme ; and stated-“ Pray, let there be much of ly preached the contrary senti-Christ in your Ministry.” And ments.

when he had heard a sermon, His way of preaching was which had any special relish of very plain, so as to be intelligi- a blessed Jesu's in it, he would ble to children; at the same say upon the occasion," Oh, blestime, being fraught with many sed be God, that we have Christ important sentiments, it was so much, and so well preached gratetul to the more knowing in poor New-England.” among

bis hearers. His way Moreover, he was pleased of preaching was very power- with no preaching, where it ful. His delivery was always evidently appeared, that there very graceful and agreeable-- had been a gross defect in studybut when he was to use reproofsing the discourse. And he and warnings against any sin, would very much commend a bis voice would rise into a sermon which he could perceive warmth, which had in it very had required some good propor. much of energy, as well as de- tion of thinking and reading in cency. Ile would sound the trum- the author of it. He once thus pet of God against all vice with expressed himself to a preacher, à most penetrating liveliness. then just come home from the And it was observed, that there assembly with him ; “ Brother, was usually a special fervor in there was oil required for the the rebukes which he bestowed service of the sanctuary ; but upon a carnal frame of life in it must be beaten oil ; I praise professors of religion : And God, that I saw your oil so wel! when he was to brand the earth beaten to-day ; the Lord help us lv mindedness of church mem- | always, by good study, to beat here, and the allowance and in- our oil, that there may be no dulgence, which some of them knots in our sermons left undistoo often gave themselves in / solved, and that there may a

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clear light be thereby given in | didly speaks of the author as a the liouse of God.”

godly, though erring brother. And yet he likewise looked He strenuously pleaded the for something in a sermon because of those, who could not sicle and beyond the mere study speak for themselves. While of man ; he was for having the he opposed errors in religion, Spirit of God breathing in it, and contended earnestly for and with it ; and he was for those doctrines and rites, which speaking those things, from he esteemed to be founded on i hose impressions, and with those the gospel ; yet no man could affections, which might compel entertain persons of a different the hearer to say, “ The Spirit persuasions from himself with of God was here."

more candor and kindness than Mr. Eliot had a deep sense of he, when he saw, to his satisfacthe solemn charge given him by tion, the fear of God prevalent the inspired apostle, in the name in their hearts and lives. He of his divine inaster, “ To take could uphold intimate corresheed to all the flock over which pondence with such men, who, the Holy Ghost had made him though differing from him in

overseer-to feed Christ's some points not essential to sallambs as well as his sheep." He vation, yet held the head, and always had a mighty concern were confirmed to the divine upon his mind for little children ; Saviour in their temper and conand took unwearied pains that duct. But having once baptiChrist might be formed in them. zed the children of professors,

One thing of which he was he did not, as too many have very desirous for poor children done, think that he had now done was that they might be brought with them: No ; another thing, under the bond of the covenant. in which he was very laborious He very openly and earnestly was the catechising of them. maintained the cause of infant He kept up the great ordinance baptism against a certain denom- of catechising both publicly and ination risen since the reforma- privately, and spent in it a great tion, who deny and strenuously deal of time. He thought himoppose it. He carefully.sudied self under a particular obligation the controversy, and found satis- to be an instructor of the young. factory arguments in the sacred Nor was he ashamed any more writings, that the infants of be-than some of the worthiest men Jievers are fit subjects to have among the ancients were, to be upon them a mark of dedication called a catechist. He would to the Lord.

observe upon John xxi. 15. That In his time a book was bro't the care of the Lambs is one among the people written by third part of the charge over one who was esteemed a pious the church of God. And givman ; but it was in oppositioning the right hand of fellowship to infant --baptism ; by it some to a young minister at his ordibecame disposed to, or confirm- nation, he addressed him in ed in a prejudice against Pædo- hearty, fervent and zealous manbaptism ; and it was not long ner, in these amongst other before Mr. Eliot published an weighty sentences : Brother, answer to it; in which he can- art thou a lover of the Lord

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father of the faithful, he would sensual delights, here he was a " command his children, and his Boanerges, a son of thunder. household after him, that they It was another property of his should keep the way of the preaching, that there was ever: Lord.”

more much of Christ in it: And As a preacher he made it his with Paul he could say, “I decare to give to every one his termined to know nothing but meat in due season. The food Jesus Christ;" having that bles. which he administered was sal. sed name in his discourses, with utary and nourishing.

a frequency like that with which mons did not consist of vain and Paul mentions it in his epistles. empty speculations, but of the The Lord Jesus Christ was the solid and important truths of the loadstone, which gave a touch gospel. In his discourses he to all the sermons of this Chrisstudiously renounced such doc- tian minister-a glorious, pretrines as detract from the grace cious, amiable Christ was the of God in the salvation of man, point of heaven, towards which or tend to undermine, or lead they still verged. From hence men to set aside and reject any it was, that he would give that of the peculiar doctrines of the advice to young preachers ; Christian scheme ; and stated- “ Pray, let there be much of ly preached the contrary senti-Christ in your Ministry." And ments.

when he had heard a sermon, His way of preaching was which had any special relish of very plain, so as to be intelligi- a blessed Jesus in it, he would ble to children ; at the same say upon the occasion," Oh, blestime, beilig fraught with many sed be God, that we have Christ important sentiments, it was so much, and so well preached grateful to the more knowing in poor New-England." among his hearers. His way Moreover, he was pleased of preaching was very power with no preaching, where it ful. His delivery was always evidently appeared, that there very graceful and agreeable-- had been a gross defect in studybut when he was to use reproofs ing the discourse. And he and warnings against any sin, would very much commend a bis voice would rise into a sermon which he could perceive warmth, which has in it very had required some good propor. much of energy, as well as de tion of thinking and reading in cency. Ile would sound the trum- the author of it. He once thus pet of God against all vice with expressed himself to a preacher, à most penetrating liveliness. then just come home from the And it was observed, that there assembly with him ; Brother, was usually a special fervor in there was oil required for the the rebukes which he bestowed service of the sanctuary ; but upon a carnal frame of life in it must be beaten oil ; I praise professors of religion : And God, that I saw vour oil so well when he was to brand the earth-beaten to-day ; the Lord help us ] mindedness of church mem- | always, by good study, to beat bers, and the allowance and in- our oil, that there may be no dulgence, which some of them knots in our sermons left undistoo often gave themselves in solved, and that there may a

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clear light be thereby given in | didly speaks of the author as a the house of God.”

godly, though erring brother. And yet he likewise looked He strenuously pleaded the for something in a sermon because of those, who could not side and beyond the mere study speak for themselves. While of man; he was for having the he opposed errors in religion, Spirit of God breathing in it, and contended earnestly for and with it ; and he was for those doctrines and rites, which speaking those things, from he esteemed to be founded on those impressions, and with those the gospel ; yet no man could affections, which might compel entertain persons of a different the hearer to say, “ The Spirit persuasions from himself with of God was here."

more candor and kindness than Mr. Eliot had a deep sense of he, when he saw, to his satisfacthe solemn charge given him by tion, the fear of God prevalent the inspired apostle, in the name in their hearts and lives. He of his divine inaster, “ To take could uphold intimate corresheed to all the flock over which pondence with such men, who, the Holy Ghost had made him though differing from him in

overseer--to feed Christ's some points not essential to sallambs as well as his sheep." He vation, yet held the head, and always had a mighty concern were confirmed to the divine upon his mind for little children ; Saviour in their temper and conand took unwearied pains that duct.-But having once baptiChrist might be formed in them. zed the children of professors,

One thing of which he was he did not, as too many have very desirous for poor children done, think that he had now done was that they might be brought with them: No ; another thing, under the bond of the covenant. in which he was very laborious He very openly and earnestly was the catechising of them. maintained the cause of infant He kept up the great ordinance baptism against a certain denom- of catechising both publicly and ination risen since the reforma- privately, and spent in it a great tion, who deny and strenuously deal of time. He thought him. oppose it. He carefully suidied self under a particular obligation the controversy, and found satis- to be an instructor of the young: factory arguments in the sacred Nor was he ashamed any more writings, that the infants of be than some of the worthiest men Jievers are fit subjects to have among the ancients were, to be upon them a mark of dedication called a catechist. He would to the Lord.

observe upon Jolin xxi. 15. That In his time a book was bro't the care of the Lambs is one among the people written by third part of the charge over one who was esteemed a pious the church of God. And givman ; but it was in opposition ing the right hand of fellowship to infant baptism ; by it some to a young minister at his ordibecame disposed to, or confirm- nation, he addressed Bim in a ed in a prejudice, against Pædo- hearty, fervent and zealous man,baptism ; and it was not long ner, in these amongst other before Mr. Eliot published an weighty sentences : Brother, answer to it; in which he can- ar't thou a lover of the Lord

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