Semi-centennial Celebration of the South Carolina College: Consisting of the Baccalaureate Address

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Walker & Evans, 1855 - 32 pagina's

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Pagina 6 - I returned, and saw under the sun, that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill ; but time and chance happeneth to them all.
Pagina 19 - Tum, pietate gravem ac meritis si forte virum quem Conspexere, silent, arrectisque auribus adstant ; Ille regit dictis animos, et pectora mulcet...
Pagina 16 - ... of this school. He made his solitary curriculum without an associate, and thereby gave an example of independence which accorded well with the integrity of his mind. May it ever be characteristic of our school to pursue the path of honor, even if it be solitary? May the man whom this College enrolls among her sons ever retain the firmness to stand alone, when duty and conscience are on his side. Nor was our protagonist unworthy of these anticipations. He was elevated to the chancery bench in...
Pagina 21 - ... contemporary portraits are reflected in the glass of memory, and later years come not within the field of its vision. Rather is it within the purpose of this celebration to inquire how far the results have corresponded with the expectations of the friends of the College, and what hopes may be reasonably entertained of the future. As to the past...
Pagina 16 - ... the human mind divided his heart with the love of polite literature. With profound piety, he was free from the slightest taint of bigotry or narrowness. Early in life he had entered into the ministry, under sectarian banners ; but though he never resiled from the creed which he had adopted — so "catholic was his spirit — so genial his soul to the inspirations of faith, hope and charity — that whether in the chair or the pulpit, he never seemed to us less than an apostolic teacher. Never...
Pagina 22 - ... as between any rival States of the Union. Although the suppression of such jealousies is in part attributable to the removal of some anomalies in the Constitution, much the largest share in the same good work is due to the attractive force of a common education. To the insensible operations of the same influence must also be referred the liberal provision that has been made for general education by the establishment of free schools. And if the benefits of such schools have not yet equalled the...
Pagina 20 - Butler—the most gallant of men, the most genial of spirits! The profession of arms well accorded with his martial character, and though his plume was not destined to wave in the battle's storm and the fortune of war confined his service to a barren field, yet no more devoted son rallied to the flag, under which he would have been proud to die for his country. Nor does the trump of Fame bear to the winds the echoes of a name where the soldier's Zeal was more gracefully blended with the tenderness...
Pagina 17 - ... as he was in youth — in health — the pride of the Faculty, the Monitor and Example of the school. When he was to speak no tablets were needed to record the absent — every student was in his place. It is a traditionary opinion that the orator is the creature of art. Poeta nascitur, orator fit. But those who heard the youthful Davis would go away with a different impression. The maxim, indeed, does not deserve assent further than this, that when the Orator has to deal with the actual affairs...
Pagina 22 - As to the past, there is much ground for gratulation in the effect which this College has had in harmonizing and uniting the State. In 1804 sectional jealousies were sharpened to bitterness and there was as little unity of feeling between the upper and lower-country as between any rival States of the Union.
Pagina 20 - Zeal was more gracefully blended with the tenderness of a gentle heart. But the youth instinct with great ideas, the Scholar, the Bard, the Genius of the school, remains. How shall I describe thee, William Harper? Careless, simple and negligent, he lived apart in the world of his own genius — his imagination brought all things human and divine within the scope of his intellectual vision. For him it was equally easy to learn or to produce. It was not to be expected that such a mind could find occupation...

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