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volumes. It appears that this subject was almost wholly neglected, both by Dr. Barrow himself, and also by his cotemporaries. The meagre sketch by his executor, Hill, is exceedingly defective, so much so that it is quite unworthy of the name of a biography. The Memoir by Mr. Hamilton is ably written; but, on account of the distance of time, he could add but few facts, and has given us rather a dissertation upon the author's genius and writings than a memoir of his life.

VOL. VI.-11

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THE

METHODIST QUARTERLY REVIEW.

APRIL, 1846.

EDITED BY GEORGE PECK, D. D.

ART. I.-The Works of Isaac Barrow, D. D. To which are pre

fired a Life of the Author by ABRAHAM HILL, and a Memoir by JAMES HAMILTON. 3 vols., 8vo. New-York: J. C. Riker.

An American edition of the complete Works of an old English divine is no faint indication of the progress of theological inquiry among us. That such Works are called for, or even their republication authorized, by the demands of “the trade," affords the clearest evidence of an increasing attention to the better class of the productions of former times. Barrow is confessedly an author of the first grade in his own class. To a mind naturally energetic and fruitful, he brought the aids of much reading, extensive observation, and profound thought. His Works have long been ranked in the first class of religious classics, abounding in clear arguments, forcible diction, and nervousness of style; and it is, therefore, to be presumed, that they will continue to be sought for by the learned and inquisitive of many generations. The publisher has imposed a debt of gratitude upon the public by his enterprise--not to say temerity-in giving them this standard work in a substantial, though plain dress.

Before proceeding to a review of the Works before us, it may not be out of place to digress a little, to notice the principal memoirs of the author, the materials for which are afforded by these volumes. It appears that this subject was almost wholly neglected, both by Dr. Barrow himself, and also by his cotemporaries. The meagre sketch by his executor, Hill, is exceedingly defective, so much so that it is quite unworthy of the name of a biography. The Memoir by Mr. Hamilton is ably written; but, on account of the distance of time, he could add but few facts, and has given us rather a dissertation upon the author's genius and writings than a memoir of his life. · VOL. VI.-11

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