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people to whom the method is familiar. May it please God to show them the difference between what is Roman and what is Christian, and may they be soon brought to acknowledge His condescension in preparing this portion of His inspired volume with so manifest an adaptation to their usage and to their conceptions.

THE LEPER. “ AND, behold, there came a leper and worshipped Him, saying, Lord, if Thou wilt, Thou canst make me clean.”—Matt. viii. 2.

CONCERNING the previous history of this leper the Evangelist is silent, and the reader is left to conjecture what it might have been. Perhaps he was a young man. Suppose this; and suppose that he had been the light and joy of his parents' hearts, and the brightest ornament of some happy family circle. In such a case, it is difficult to conceive of the deep distress into which that family must have been plunged when they first discovered the symptoms of leprosy on the noble youth, the pride of his father's house.

Who can describe the bitter anguish that would wring the beart of the doting mother, or the silent grief pressing into the very dust the soul of the affectionate father, when they first saw the spot of leprosy on the expanding brow of their beloved boy?

Suppose him to have been a favourite child. He had been dearer to them than any other member of their family. He had exhibited in childhood an amount of piety and of mental power not possessed by any of the other children. This had raised the hopes of his fond parents. They had watched over him with all the tenderness of parental care. They had laboured to improve his piety, and to enlarge his mind. With many tears they had sought for him the blessing of “the Most High," and they had looked forward to the time when he would become the staff, the comfort, the honour of their old age. “Their life was bound up in the life of the lad.” But now all those long-cherished hopes are at once blasted. They have discovered upon their child the white spot, which is the sure beginning of that awful plague! In vain they try to wash it away. In vain they water it with their tears. In vain they endeavour to persuade themselves into the .

,In the year NoNE BESIDEs ME " : בשנת אין זולתי לפ"ק

called in the synagogue 997—and the number of this name, that is to say, the numerical value of its component lettern, is 666. This computation is not new, nor is it presented to the readers of the “Youth's Instructer” as a discovery, for it has been current for more than a century, and was suggested centuries before ; but it recalls the fact that this manner of combining words and numbers is in daily practice with the Jews. This appears on the title-pages of their books; where, instead of exhibiting numbers, either at length or by figures, they find a word that will contain the dute, and must frequently have to exercise great ingenuity in making such a choice as will not only serve the first purpose, but be in itself elegant, and even highly suggestive. Out of many Hebrew title-pages lying within reach, we take the following:

A book printed at Leghorn in the year 1753, or, as the Jews count, 5513-14. The date is thus given :

): “, lesser computation.” The two middle words are

to be counted letter by letter, (1) • (10) 7 (50) 7 (7) 7 (6) 3 (30) m (400) ^ (10), making 514, the thousands being dropped in "lesser coinputation.” The Christian date being also put, in obedience to the civil or ecclesiastical authority of Leghorn, it results that the book was printed some time between the middle of September and the end of the year 1753. A Prayer-book is printed in London, in the year “Open Thou mine eyes, that I may see wonders.” The symbolic word noswonders, indicates the year 5567, from which deducting 3760, as must always be done, to reduce the Jewish to the Christian year, it turns out that the book belongs to 1807. The same principle of indicating, rather than expressing, numbers, prevails in all notation of dates ; and thus you may find the notices hung up in the synagogues for a Sabbath, or for a week, distinguished by the first word of the parashah, or appointed lesson for that Sabbath, instead of the name of the nonth, and number of the day. A similar custom prevailed in other Eastern countries. This being once remembered, we cease to wonder at the strangeness of the passage before us, and understand that it is written for a

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people to whom the method is familiar. May it please God to show them the difference between what is Roman and what is Christian, and may they be soon brought to acknowledge His condescension in preparing this portion of His inspired volume with so manifest an adaptation to their usage and to their conceptions.

THE LEPER. And, behold, there came a leper and worshipped Him, saying, Lord, if Thou wilt, Thou canst make me clean."- Matt. viii. 2.

CONCERNING the previous history of this leper the Evangelist is silent, and the reader is left to conjecture what it might have been. Perhaps he was a young man. Suppose this; and suppose that he had been the light and joy of his parents' hearts, and the brightest ornament of some happy family circle. In such a case, it is difficult to conceive of the deep distress into which that family must have been plunged when they first discovered the symptoms of leprosy on the noble youth, the pride of his father's house. Who can describe the bitter anguish that would wring the heart of the doting mother, or the silent grief pressing into the very dust the soul of the affectionate father, when they first saw the spot of leprosy on the expanding brow of their beloved boy?

Suppose him to have been a favourite child. He had been dearer to them than any other member of their family. He had exhibited in childhood an amount of piety and of mental power not possessed by any of the other children. This had raised the hopes of his fond parents.

They had watched over him with all the tenderness of parental care. They had laboured to improve his piety, and to enlarge his mind. With many tears they had sought for him the blessing of “the Most High,” and they had looked forward to the time when he would become the staff, the comfort, the honour of their old age. “Their life was bound up in the life of the lad.” But now all those long-cherished hopes are at once blasted. They have discovered upon their child the white spot, which is the sure beginning of that awful plague! In vain they try to wash it away. In vain they water it with their tears. In vain they endeavour to persuade themselves into the .

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belief that they are deceived. In vain they obtain the highest medical skill. Morning after morning that fearful white spot enlarges, until the withering truth has fully forced itself upon

their mind that their son, their beloved boy, is a leper ! And he must clothe himself in sackcloth; he must put the covering on his lip; he must leave the paternal roof; he must tear himself away from the embraces of his heart-broken parents and his weeping relatives; he must bid a last adieu to the home of his childhood, and become a wanderer in the wide world, an outcast from society; for God has commanded that the leper shall be separated from the people.

Or the reader may conceive that the person mentioned by the Evangelist was a man farther advanced in life. Perhaps he sustained the endearing relations of husband and father. In this case the distress would, if possible, be heightened ; because he was the stay, the support, of the beloved ones around him. Suppose that one evening, after the fatigue of the day, he reached his beloved home; and, having found the usual welcome, and partaken of the usual refreshing cheer, gathered his happy family around the hearth, and in the midst of them forgot the cares and trials of the day. And as he received the artless caresses of his little ones, and gazed on the beaming countenance of their mother, his heart warmed with all the intensity of a husband's and a father's love. Ah! little thought that happy household of the awfully dark cloud that was gathering over them, and about to burst upon their heads. The evening rolled round, and they retired to rest, cheerful and happy as usual. The night passed away, and the morning dawned; but the light of that morning brought with it a fearful discovery. The husband, the father, is a leper! The white spot, that fearful white spot, has appeared; and it tells the mother that she is a widow, the children that they are fatherless, and the father that he is an outcast from all he loves on earth! But it is the will of God; and he prepares to take his departure. He wraps himself in the sackcloth; he puts the covering on his lip; he leaves his beloved ones to the care of Him who is the Friend of the fatherless and the widow; and, as he passes from the threshold of the dwelling which contains all that is

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dear to him in this world, he raises his voice, and cries, “Unclean, unclean !” Those who hear him remove out of the path, and the poor outcast is left to pursue his lonely wanderings.

In the midst of those wanderings He hears of One whose name falls upon his ear like music. It is “Jesus of Nazareth.” Some one ventures near to him, and tells him of the extraordinary Personage who was going about doing good.” It was stated to him that this Jesus had, in the exercise of a Divine power, not only opened blind eyes, unstopped deaf ears, and loosed dumb tongues, but that He had also cleansed some lepers! Let the reader conceive, if he can, what feelings must have taken possession of the poor leper's mind, as he listened to those tidings. Hope, soulsustaining hope, was awakened in his breast. He had now but one desire ; and that was to speak with Jesus of Nazareth. He sought for Him. He found Him. The Saviour was fulfilling His commission as “ the Prophet of the Lord ; the great Interpreter Divine.” He was delivering to multitudes who surrounded Him His memorable sermon on the mount. The poor leper remained at a distance, for he dared not to mingle with the people; and, keeping his eye steadily fixed on the person of the “great Teacher,” he waited for the end of the discourse. At length it finishes; the multitudes disperse; the Saviour comes down from the mount. approaches him, trembling: his mind is torn with doubt as to the reception he may find. But he approaches Him; he throws himself at His feet; he worships Him; and, with half-choked utterance, he says, “Lord, if Thou wilt, Thou canst make me clean.”

Methinks I see the Saviour bending over him. I great Philanthropist " looking upon the poor leper prostrated at His feet! That look is full of compassion, of tenderness, of love. He speaks. And the leper's heart bounds with joy and gratitude when he bears Him say, “I will; be thou clean."

“Now, Lord, to whom for help I call,

Thy miracles repeat;
With pitying eyes behold me fall
A leper at Thy feet.

The leper

see

“ the

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