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perhaps ever wituessed in Georgia. So great have becn is revo: ges, that whole forests have been laid prostrate, and som, c cf the finest highland in this state rendered a heap of ruins. Many of the best plantations have become unfit for immediate cultivation; houses, fences and stock have been swept away or destroyed; and the distress of the planters (many of whom were new settlers, and had just began to surmount their difficulties) is indiscribable. Some of them have lost their all, having neither a horse to plough, nor a cow to milk.

The width of the tornado is supposed to have been about twe miles ; but its extent has not been ascertained. It passed over the Oakmulgies, about the 7th district of Baldwin, in an easterly direction. Sav. Reh.

Such is the progress of our settlements that a Gazette is proposed at Zanesville in Ohio. Of Nashville in Tenessee it is said, that 31 years ago it was unintabited, and not a white man was within 20 miles of it, but it now contains a property assessed exceed

| ing 300,000 dollars, with a popu

lation of nearly three hundred persons, among whom are many artificers. - -The London Statesman of Feb. 5, says—The object of Colonel Burr's visit to Paris, is said to be

-

to submit to the French executive a project for disuniting the American States, and for other measures of effectual hostility, in the event of a rupture between the two tountries. Mr. Burr communicated his plans to our govern ment, together with his views of the means necessary for their execution ; at the same time announcing his determination of applying to France in the event of his proposals befng rejected.

--

*

The following are the names and ages of the adults who have been interred in this city and at Potter's Field during the two weeks ending on May 3th, 1810:

* Henry Howe, aged 28, 5ohn Coffin 31, 5ohn Coleman 78, Hetty Dezeny 30 George Nuller 30, Mary Richardson 60, 5ames Main 34, Dorothy Patten 33, Mary Dougherty 19, Margaret La Boulay 63, jomas Hussant 55, Fanny cassady 50, john Smith 62, George AIalley 20, Captain Whitney 27, Baltus Rearns 18, Abigal Conti 25, Thomas Howlett 59, Dorothy Ellsworth, 70, Catharine Slade 45, Elizabeth Coon 87, john Ross 20, Mary Rose 23, Michael Parker 50, Richard Stoddard 35, Benja. anin Stratton 73, Margaret Brown 40, Mary johnson 27, james Gaugh 41, john Grant 30, Catharine Sweetman 45, Tone 21, Bryan M*Gowan 34, Conal Devolon 36, Madam Bernard 81, Michael Gardner 47, jane Powers 50, john Rankin 52, 5ane Munday 27, Any Brown 39, Margaret Renard 40,

5ames Haga 25, Flora Sampson 70,

Margaret Madden 42, Charles Stewart

47. JAMES HARDIE.

MARRIED,

On Saturday evening, by the Rev. Mr. Coosier, Mr. Wielian B. Cozzens, to Miss Sarah Martling Evener, adofited daughter of Abraham B. Martling, all of this city.

JA few days since, by the Rev. Mr. Gutsenhimer, Mr. Issacher, Cozzens, jun. to Miss Mary Ann Shinks.

On Sunday evening last, by the Rev. Mr. Bartow, Caht. Benjamin Hunt, of East Chester, to Miss Ann Doughty, of the former hlace.

...At Athens, Caft. James Foster, of New-York, to Miss Ann Colston, of Athens.

On Saturday evening, by the Rev. Mr. Williams, Mr. Thomas Smith, to Miss Henrietta Gatt. !/? both of this city.

.Mt Sag-Harbor, by the Rev. Dr. Woolworth, Mr. Mathan Cook, to Miss Polly L'Hommedieu, daughter of Samuel L'Hommedieu, Esq.

*=-r D I E D, JAt Mew Jersey, Cañtain George M.Mroy, aged 78, commander of one of the first continental veesels. ..ft Philadelfishia, Jacob Broom, esq. of Delaware, member of the convention which formed the federal convention. .Mt Baltimore, on the 6th inst. Miss Eufthemia White, daughter of the late Dr. Daniel JWhite, of JWestchester, in the state of NewYork. .Mt Elizabethtown, Mrs. Rachel

| Freeman.

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THIE I' RIUMPH OF TRUTH,

A TALE. |

IN a gay and flourishing city in the north of England, resided your Steinfort and Eliza, characters equally celebrated for their personal accomplishments, but whose dispositions were the reverse of what they were represented by the world. Steinsort in whom a detestation of the frivolous pursuits of fashion, was supposed a detestation of every thing sacred and

excellent, appeared to the eye of

the world as a sullen misanthrope ; though it was secretly whispered that his private hours were spent in secret revels and sensual gratifications. Eliza, in whom united a masculine understanding, with the most feminine sweetness, owed the false colouring of her character to neglected beaux and sighted admirers, who coneluded that nothing but a miracle of asfection and coquetly could have remained insensible to their forced sighs and studied exclamations,— Such were the opinions of the world of the two amiable characters who had been mutually stricken with each other’s person, with

‘o further acquaintance than a

casual meeting in their walks, or sitting in the same box at the theatre ; and had secretly lamented an incongruity of disposition which unfitted them for that happiness which each had eagerly anticipated from the ties of matrimony.− Steinfort being one evening in a mixed company, who freely handled the reputation of their neighbours, perhaps even without a Superficial acquaintance, heard his fair Eliza pictured as the child of caprice and the dupe of flattery, insomuch, that every sentence which raagnified her charms or extolled her virtues, was answered with the sigh of desire, and a look that seemed to thirst for In 10tes

Revolving these thoughts in his mind, he strayed into a neighboring grove to ruminate on the deception of appearances and lament that personal beauty should be the companion of mental deformity.— Having seated himself beneath an embowering oak in a remote part of the wood, he began to philosophize on his present state of mind. Those principles which had hitl, erto been his sole motive to ac tion, seemed sensibly to have lost their influence, and he endeavored

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