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On Friday, 10th inst of a lingering illness, Mr. John Davidson.

On the 6th inst. at his late res:dence at Oysterbay, on Long Island, in the 73d year of his age, the Rev. Benjamin Coles, for many years the fiastor of the Bahtist Church in that filace, much lamented by all his acquaintance ; it may be justly said, that he was a kind Husband, and an affectionate Parent, and much cmgaged in the cause of his divine master—he has been a faithful fireacher of the distinguishing doctrines of the Goshel, for about fifty years, he was a real friend to the American revolution, and a great advocate for civil and religious liberty.

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oR. THE WEEKLY VISITOR.

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For the Lady's Miscellany.

EPITAPHS.

On a Negro who died of Love.
UNE a disa tone,
Puta a taller-face Pomp :
He die for Sally Cuss t
Ib he lib, he aut too't,
She hab'm—now he die like a fool,
She seem dam fuss.

On a much esteemed Dog, whose name
was Good Luck.
Benrath this stone, was put Good
Luck,
'Twas Death! (Bad Luck) that caus'd it.
May Death —by death one day be
stuck, : - -
That Good Luck have revenge for’t.

On Alderman Quin.

Alderman Quin, he died in sin,
And Christ church was his harbor:
with his razor he cut his own throat,
And the d–l was his barber.

FOR SALE,

A few Numbers of the 9th and 10th Vol. of the Lady’s Weekly Miscellany, bound, at this Office. = ,

PRINTED AND publishzd BY

MoCARTY & WHITE,

No. 317 Water-street, New-York: in half yearly volumes, containing twentysix numers each, (issued weekly ) at One Dollar the volume, payable quar. Distant patrons to pay in advance. Postage to be paid on as setters dorceted to the Editors,

* : *

tery.

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CO.WSTA.WTIM , or, UNExAMPLED MAGNANIMITY.

A TALE. (Concluded.)

Constantia, tho' she shed many tears as she spoke, yet spoke in the tone of a determined martyr. I repeated every argument that reason and friendship could suggest, to shake a resolution so pernicious to herself; but I could make no impression on her mind ; shehad determined to adhere strictly to the letter, as well as the spirit ef her father's interdictions; and, as I perceived, she had an honest pride, in her filial piety, I could no longer think of opposing it. Instead, therefore, of recommending to her a new system of life, I endeavoured to reconcile her mind to her present situation. “Perhaps,” replied Constantia, “ no female orphan, who has been preserved by Providence from absolute want, from infamy and guilt, ought to repine at her condition; and, when I consider the more deplorable wretchedness of some unhappy beings of my own sex, whose mis. ery, perhaps, has arisen more from

Saturday, August 25,.... 1810.

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accident than from voluntary er" ror, I am inclined to reproach my own heart for these murmers, which, sometimes, I confess to you, escape from it in solitude 5 yet, if I were to give you a genuine account of all that I endure, you, I know, would kindly assure me, that the discontent, which l strive in vain to subdue, has not amounted to a crime.” She then entered into a detail of many domestic scenes, and gave me so strong a picture of life, destitute of all social comfort, and harassed by such an infinitude of dispiriting vexations, that I expressed a very sincere admiration of the meek and modest fortitude which she had displayed in supporting it so long. “I have, indeed, suffered a great deal,” said Constantia, with a deep sigh ; “but the worst is not over; I am afraid that I shall lose all sense of humanity ; I can take no interest in any thing ; and, to confess a very painful truth to you, I do not feel as I ought to do, the undeserved attention and friendship which I am at this moment receiving from you.” I would have tried to rally her out of these gloomy phantasies ; but she interrupted me, by exclaiming, with a stern, yet low voice, “Indeed it is t-Erue ; and I can only explain my sensations to you, by saying, that I feel as if my heart was turning into stone.” This forcible expression, and the corresponding cast of countenance with which she uttered it, rendered me for some moments, unable to reply; it struck me, indeed, as a lamentable truth, to which different parts of her much-altered frame bore a strong though silewt testimony. In her face, which was once remarkable for a fine complexion, and the most animated leok of intelligent good-nature, there now appeared a sallow paleness, and, though not a sour, yet a settled dejection ; her hands also had the same bloodless appearance, retaining neither the warmth nor the colour of living flesh ; yet Constantia was at this time perfectly free from every nominal distemper.

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The entrance of Mrs. Braggard gave a new turn to our conversation, but without affording us relief. That good lady endeavoured to entertain me with particular attention ; but there was such a strange mixture of vulgar dignity and indelicate facetiousness in her discourse, that she was very far from succeeding in her design.-Sile asked me, if I was not greatly struck by the change that a few years had made in the countenance of her neice, hinting, in very coarse terms of awkward jocularity that the loss of her complexion was to be imputed to her single life and adding, with an affec

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