The works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 10

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1824
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Page 355 - Just in the gate, and in the jaws of hell, Revengeful Cares and sullen Sorrows dwell; And pale Diseases, and repining Age, Want, Fear, and Famine's unresisted rage; Here Toils, and Death, and Death's half-brother Sleep (Forms terrible to view), their sentry keep; With anxious Pleasures of a guilty mind; Deep Frauds before, and open Force behind; The Furies' iron beds; and Strife, that shakes Her hissing tresses, and unfolds her snakes.
Page 291 - This praise the general interest of mankind requires to be given to writers who please and do not corrupt, who instruct and do not weary. But to them all human eulogies are vain, whom I believe applauded by angels, and numbered with the juat.
Page 245 - ... experience could evince the frequency of false information, or enable any man to conceive that so many groundless reports should be propagated, as every man of eminence may hear of himself. Some men relate what they think, as what they know; some men of confused memories and habitual inaccuracy, ascribe to one man what belongs to another ; and some talk on, without thought or care. A few men are sufficient to broach falsehoods, which are afterwards innocently diffused by successive relaters."*...
Page 489 - O DEATH, how bitter is the remembrance of thee to a man that liveth at rest in his possessions, Unto the man that hath nothing to vex him, and that hath prosperity in all things: Yea, unto him that is yet able to receive meat!
Page 263 - I am always afraid of determining on the side of envy or cruelty. The privileges of education may sometimes be improperly bestowed, but I shall always fear to withhold them, lest I should be yielding to the suggestions of pride, while I persuade myself that I am following the maxims of policy ; and under the appearance of salutary restraints, should be indulging the lust of dominion, and that malevolence which delights in seeing others depressed. Pope's doctrine is at last exhibited in a comparison...
Page 219 - ... a hardened and shameless Tea-drinker, who has for twenty years diluted his meals with only the infusion of this fascinating plant, whose kettle has scarcely time to cool, who with Tea amuses the evening, with Tea solaces the midnight, and with Tea welcomes the morning.
Page 214 - As to your first query, it seems to me that if the matter of our sun and planets and all the matter of the universe were evenly scattered throughout all the heavens, and every particle had an innate gravity towards all the rest, and the whole space throughout which this matter was scattered was...
Page 214 - And thus might the sun and fixed stars be formed, supposing the matter were of a lucid nature. But how the matter should divide itself into two sorts, and that part of it, which is fit to compose a shining body, should fall down into one mass and make a sun...
Page 319 - I started, and beheld myself surrounded by the rocks of Teneriffe : the birds of light were singing in the trees, and the glances of the morning darted upon me. THE FOUNTAINS A FAIRY TALE.* Felix qui potuit boni Fontem visere lucidum.
Page 429 - ... false, they are too much degraded from the dignity of pastoral innocence; and instead of rejoicing that they are both victorious, I should not have grieved could they have been both defeated. The poem to Pollio is, indeed, of another kind : it is filled with images at once splendid and pleasing, and is elevated with grandeur of language worthy of the first of Roman poets ; but I am not able to reconcile myself to the disproportion between the performance and the occasion that produced it...

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