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LXXVI. Spirit of Love, whose tresses shine 235 The Surprise

248

LXXVII. Hither, gentle muse of mine

236

To a sleeping Maid

ib.

LXXVIII. Would that I were a tuneful lyre ib. To Phillis .

ib.

LXXIX. When Cupid sees my beard of snow

Song:- When the heart's feeling

ib.

FRAGMENTS.

The Ballad

ib.

Cupid, whose lamp has lent the ray

ib. To Mrs

on her translation of Voi-

Let me resigu a wretched breath

ib.

ture's Kiss.

ib.

I know thou lovest a brimming measure ib. To a Lady, on her Singing

249

I fear that love disturbs my rest

ib. A Dream

ib.

From dread Leucadia's frowning steep

ib. Written in a Common-place book

ib.

Mix me, child, a cup divine .

ib. To the pretty little Mrs

ib.

EPIGRAMS TRANSLATED FROM ANTIPATER SIDONIUS. Song.-Dear! in pity do not speak

ib.

Around the tomb, oh bard divine!

The Tear

ib.

237

ib.

To

Here sleeps Anacreon, in this ivied shade

--- So! Rosa turns her back on me ib.

Oh stranger ! if Anacreon's shell

To Julia weeping

238

250

At length thy golden hours have wing’d their

Song.-Have you not seen the timid tear ib.

flight

ib.

The Shield

ib.

To Mrs --- Yes, heaven can witness

LITTLE'S POEMS.

how I strove

ib.

Preface

239 Elegiac Stanzas

251

Dedication

240 Fanny of Timmol

To Julia

ib.

A Night-thought

252

To a Lady, with some manuscript poems 241 Elegiac Stanzas

ib.

To Mrs - If, in the dream that hovers ib.

The Kiss

ib.

To the large and beautiful Miss

ib.

To ---- With all my soul, then, let.

To Julia

ib.

us part

ib.

Inconstancy

242 A Reflection at Sea

253

Imitation of Catullus

ib.

An Invilation to Supper

ib.

Epigram

ib.

An Ode upon Morning

ib.

To Julia

ib.

Song.-Oh! nothing in life can sadden us ib.

Song.–Sweet seducer, blandly smiling . ib.

Come, tell me where the maid is found

Nature's Labels

254

243 Sweetest love! I'll not forget thee

ib.

To Mrs M- Sweet lady, Icok not thus

If I swear by that eye

ib.

again

ib.

Julia's Kiss

ib.

Song.-Why, the world are all thinking

To--- Remember him thou leavest

about it

ib.

behind

255

To Julia

ib.

Fly from the world, O Bessy! to me

ib.

Impromptu

ib.

Think on that look of humid

ib.

To Rosa

244

A captive thus to thee

ib.

Sympathy

ib.

The Catalogue

To Julia

ib.

A Fragment

ib.

To Mrs --- Yes, I think I once heard ib.

Where is the nymph

ib.

On the Death of a Lady

ib.

When time, who steals our years away

ib.

To Julia

ib.

The Shrine

To

257

Can I again that form caress 245

Reuben and Rose

ib.

Written in the blank leaf of a Lady's com-

The Ring

258

mon-place book

ib.

Of all my happiest hours of joy

260

Song.-Away with this pouting and sadness ib.

To a boy with a watch

ib,

To Rosa

Fragments of College exercises

261

To ditto

ib.

Mary, I believed thee true

ib.

Rondeau

ib.

Why does azure deck the sky?

ib.

An Argument to any Phyllis or Chloe ib.

Morality, a familiar epistle

ib.

To Rosa

246

The Natal Genius, a dream

262

Anacreontique

ib.

Ditto

ib. THE LOVES OF THE ANGELS.

263

Oh, woman,

if by simple wile

ib.

Notes.

279

Love and Marriage

ib.

The Kiss

247

IRISH MELODIES.-No. I.

To Miss

ib. Advertisement to the First and Second Num-

Nonsense

ib.

bers

283

To Julia, on her birth-day

ib.

Go where glory waits thee

284

Elegiac Slanzas

ib. Remember the glories of Brien the brave ib.

To Rosa

ib.

Erin! the tear and the smile in thine eyes 285

Love in a Storm

248

Oh! breathe not his name, let it sleep in the

Song.-Jessy on a bank was sleeping

ib.

shade

ib.

,

ib.

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When he who adores thee has left but the

Here we dwell, in holiest bowers

399

285

This life is all chequer'd with pleasures and

The harp that once through Tara's halls ib.

ib.

Fly not yet, 't is just the hour

Oh ! think not my spirits are always as light ib. Advertisement

ib.

Though the last glimpse of Erin with sorrow

Through Erin's isle

30d

I see

At the 'mid hour of night, when stars are

Rich and rare were the gems she wore

ib.

weeping

ib.

As a beam o'er the face of the waters may One bumper at parting !-though many ib.

glow

ib.

'T is the last rose of summer

301

There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet ib.

The young May-moon is beaming, love ib.

No. II.

The minstrel-boy to the war is gone

ib.

Oh! haste and leave this sacred isle

ib. The valley lay smiling, before me

ib.

How dear to me the hour when daylight dies 287

Oh! had we some bright little isle of our own 302

Take back the virgin page

ib.

Farewell :--but whenever you welcome the

When in death I shall calm recline

ib.

hour

ib.

How oft bas the Benshee cried

ib.

Oh! doubt me not-the season

ib.

We may roam through this world, like a child

You remember Ellen, our hamlet's pride ib.

at a feast

288

I'd mourn the hopes that leave me .

303

Oh! weep for the hour

ib. No. VI.

Let Erin remember the days of old

ib.

Advertisement

ib.

Silent, oh Moyle! be the roar of thy water 289 Come o'er the sea

ib.

Come, 'send'round the wine, and leave points

Has sorrow thy young days shaded

ib.

of belief

ib.

No, not more welcome the fairy numbers 304

Sublime was the warning I which Liberty

When first I met thee, warm and young ib.

spoke

While History's muse the memorial was keep-

Believe me, if all those endearing young

ing -

ib.

charms

ib. The time I've lost in wooing

305

No. III.

Where is the slave, so lowly

ib.

Letter to the Marchioness Dowager of Do-

Come, rest in this bosom, my own stricken

negal

deer!

ib.

290

Like the bright lamp that shone in Kildare's

'T is gone, and for ever, the light we saw

holy fane

breaking

ib.

292

Drink to her, who long

293

I saw from the beach, when the morning was

Oh! blame not the bard, if he fly to the

shining .

306

bowers

ib.

Fill the bumper fair!

ib.

While gazing on the moon's light

ib. Dear harp of my country! in darkness I found

When daylight was yet sleeping under the

thee

ib.

billow

294 No. VIT.

By the hope, within us springing

ib.

Advertisement

307

Night closed around the conqueror's way

ib.

My gentle harp! once more I waken

ib.

Oh! 't is sweet to think, that, where'er we

As slow our ship her foamy track

ib.

ib. In the morning of life, when its cares are un-

Through grief and through danger

295

known .

When through life unbless'd we rove

ib. When cold in the earth lies the friend thou

It is not the tear at this moment shed

ib.

hast loved

308

'T is believed that this harp, which I wake

Remember thee! yes, while there's life in this

now

ib.

heart

ib.

No. IV.

Wreathe the bowl .

ib.

Whene'er I see those smiling eyes

ib.

Advertisement

296

Oh! the days are gone when beauty bright. ib.

If thou 'll be mine, the treasures of air 309

Though dark are our sorrows, to-day we'll

To ladies' eyes a round, boys

ib.

Forget not the field where they perish'd . ib.

forget them.

ib.

Weep on, weep on, your hour is past

They may rail at this life—from the hour I

297

Lesbia hath'a beaming eye

ib.

began it

ib.

I saw thy form in youthful prime.

Oh for the swords of former time!

ib.

By that lake whose gloomy shore

298 No. VIII.

She is far from the land where her young hero

Ne'er ask the hour-what is it to us .

ib.

sleeps

ib. Sail on, sail on, thou 'fearless bark

ib.

Nay, tell me not, dear, that the goblet drowns ib. Yes, sad one of Sion-if closely resembling ib.

Avenging and bright fall the swift sword of Drink of this cup-you 'll find there's a spell

ib.

in it.

311

What the bee is to the floweret

299 Down in the valley come meet me to-night ib.

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31

Go, then-'t is vain.-Sicilian Air

312 The crystal hunters.-Swiss Air .

ib. Row gently here.-Venetian Air

ib. Oh! the days of youth.- French Air

il. When first that smile.- Venetian Air.

Peace to the slumberers ! - Catalonian Air.

313 When thou shalt wander.-Sicilian Air

ib. Who'll buy my love-knots ?—Portuguese Air

See, the dawn from Heaven.-Sung at Rome

314

on Christmas Eve ...

No. IV.

ib.

Nets and Cages.—Swedish Air

When through the piazzetta.-Venetian Air

315

Go, now, and dream.--Sicilian Air

Take hence the bowl. - Neapolitan Air

ib.

Farewell, Theresa !- Venetian Air

ib.

How oft, when watching stars.--,

-Savoyard

316

Air

ib.

When the first summer bee.-German Air,

ib.

Though 't is all but a dream.- French Air.

ib.

'T is when the cup is smiling.- Italian Air.

317 Where shall we bury our shame?- Neapoli-

ib.

tan Air

Ne'er talk of Wisdom's gloomy schools.-

ib.

Mahratta dir.

318 Here sleeps the bard. ---Highland Air

No. V.

ib.

Do not say that life is waning.-Danish Air

ib.

The Gazelle.- Hindoo Air

ib.

No-leave my heart to rest.– - Spanish Air.

Where are the visions ?- Air unknown

ib.

Wind thy horn, my hunter boy.-- German

ib.

Air

Oh guard our affection.—Scotch Air

Slumber, oh slumber.- Air unknown .

ib.

Bring the bright garlands hither.- Russian

il,

Air

If in loving, singing.--Spanish Air

ib.

Too plain, alas! — French Air.

When abroald in the world.-Italian Air

Keep those

eyes still purely mine.-German

ib.

Air

No. VI.

ib.

Hope comes again.-Old English Air .

ib.

I would tell her I love her.-Italian Air

ib.

Oh say, thou best and brightest. -- Spanish Air

When night brings the hour.---Florentine Air

Like One, wbo doom'd.- Indian Air .

Fear not that, while around thee.- French

ib.

ib.

Love alone.-French Air.

ib.

ib.

The garland I send thee.- Italian Air.

How shall I wool - Italian Air

322

Spring and autumn.- French Air

il.

When love is kind. - Austrian Air

Mark-I hear a spirit sing.-Hindostanee Air

ib. SACRED SONGS.-No. I.

ib.

Thou art, oh God!

This world is all a fleeting show

ib.

Fallen is thy throne

Who is the maid?

323 The bird, let loose
ib. Oh! Thou who dry'st the mourner's tear!

319

Oh, the sight entrancing ·

No. IX.

Sweet Innisfallen, fare thee well

'T was one of those dreams that by music

are brought

Fairest ! put on awbile

Quick! we have but a second

And doth not a meeting like this make

amends

In yonder valley, there dwelt alone

As vanquished Erin wept beside

By the Feal's wave benighted .

They know not my heart

I wish I was by that dim lake

She sung of love,-while o'er her lyre .

Sing, sing, music was given

NATIONAL AIRS.-No. .

Advertisement.

A temple to Friendship.- Spanish Air

Flow on, thou shining river.- Portuguese

dir

All that 's bright must fade.- Indian Air .

So warmly we met.- Hungarian Air.

Those evening bells.- Air, The Bells of St

Petersburgh

Should those fond hopes.— Portuguese Air

Reason, Folly, and Beauty.- Italian Air

Fare thee well, thou lovely one!-Sicilian

Air

Dost thou remember?Portuguese Air

Oh! come to me when daylight sets.—Vene-

tian Air

Oft, in the stilly night.-Scotch Air

Hark! the vesper hymn is stealing.– Russian

Air

No. II.

Love and Hope.-Swiss Air

There comes a time.-German Air

My harp has one unchanging theme.- Swe-

dish Air

Oh! no-not e'en when first we loved.

Cashmerian Air

Peace be around thee!-Scotch Air

Common Sense and Genius.-- French Air.

Then, fare thee well !-Old English Air

Gaily sounds the castanet.— Maltese Air

Love is a hunter-boy.-Languedocian Air .

Come, chase that starting tear away.-- French

Air

Joys of youth, how fleeting! - Portuguese

Air

Hear me but once.-French Air

No. JII.

Wien Love was a child.- Swedish Air.

Say, what shall be our sport to-day?-

1-Sici-

lian Air

Bright be thy dreams!-Welsh Air

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345

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had entered Naples.

The Insurrection of the Papers

Parody of a celebrated Leiter .

Anacreontic.- 'To a Plumassier

Extracts from the Diary of a Politician

King Crack and his Idols .

Wreaths for the Ministers.

The new Costume of the Ministers

Occasional Address

The sale of the Tools

Little Man and little Soul

Reinforcements for Lord Wellington

Lord Wellington and the Ministers

Fum and llum, the two birds of royalty

Epistle from Tom Crib to Big Ben .

To Lady Holland, on Napoleon's legacy of a

snuff-box

ib.

ib.

349

ib.

ib.

366

ib.

ib.

367

ib.

ib.

il.

350

ib.

ib.

ib.

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Correspondence between a lady and a gentle-

368

Horace, ode XI. lib. II.

ib.

ode XXII, lib. I.

--, ode I. lib. III.

. 369

ode XSXVIII. lib. I.

ib.

To ---- Die when you will

370

Impromptu.- Retween Adam and me

ib.

What's my thought like?

ib.

Epigram. What news to day?

ib.

Said his Highness to Ned

ib.

I want the court-guide

ib.

I never give a kiss

ib.

On a squinting Poetess

The Torch of Liberty

ib.

Epilogue.

. 371

To the Memory of J. Atkinson, Esq.

ib.

Epitaph on a well-known poet

372

The Sylph's ball

ib.

Remonstrance to Lord J. Russel

373

Epitaph on a Lawyer

ib.

My birth-day

373

Fancy- the more I've view'd this world 374

Love and lymen

ib.

Translations from Catullus

ib.

To my Moiber; written in a pocket-book ib.

Illustration of a Bore

375

A Speculation .

ib.

Scepticism

ib.

From the French. Of all the men one meets

about

ib.

Romance.

ib.

A Joke versified

ib.

On ----.

Like a snuffers this loving old

dame

ib.

Fragment of a character

ib.

Country-dance and Quadrille

. 376

Song. For the Poco-Curante Society · 377

Genius and Criticism

378

The Witch's Sabbath

ib.

Extempore

379

Reflection at sea

ib.

From Plato

ib.

ODES UPON CASH, CORN, CATHOLICS, etc.

Amatory Colloquy between Bank and Govern-

ment

380

Dialogue between a Sovereign and a One

Pound Note

ib.

An Exposition to Lord King

330

The Sinking Fund cried

ib.

Ode to the Goddess Ceres

ib.

A Hymn of Welcome after the Recess 382

Memorabilia of last week

383

All in the family way

ib.

Ballad for the Cambridge Election

384

Mr Roger Dodsworth

ib.

Copy of an Intercepted Despatch

.

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