Observations on the Popular Antiquities of Great Britain: Chiefly Illustrating the Origin of Our Vulgar and Provincial Customs, Ceremonies, and Superstitions, Volume 3

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For Folklore, reading Brands is like reading the Lewis and Clark Journals. It provides an unpolluted view of collected lore traditions with many references to thread. The Yuletide season has special interest and aspects that are not found anywhere else. Volledige review lezen

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Pagina 303 - Himself best knows : but strangely-visited people, All swoln and ulcerous, pitiful to the eye, The mere despair of surgery, he cures ; Hanging a golden stamp about their necks, Put on with holy prayers : and, 'tis spoken, To the succeeding royalty he leaves The healing benediction.
Pagina 179 - If I beheld the sun when it shined, Or the moon walking in brightness ; And my heart hath been secretly enticed, Or my mouth hath kissed my hand : This also were an iniquity to be punished by the judge : For I should have denied the God that is above.
Pagina 73 - I could a tale unfold, whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul ; freeze thy young blood ; Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from...
Pagina 292 - Into the body of the tree a deep hole was bored with an auger, and a poor devoted shrew-mouse was thrust in alive, and plugged in, no doubt, with several quaint incantations long since forgotten. As the ceremonies necessary for such a consecration are no longer understood, all succession is at an end, and no such tree is known to subsist in the manor, or hundred. As to that on the Plestor "The late Vicar stubb'd and burnt it...
Pagina 242 - O' th' compass in their bones and joints, Can by their pangs and aches find All turns and changes of the wind, And better than by Napier's bones Feel in their own the age of moons...
Pagina 153 - How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank ! Here will we sit and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears; soft stillness and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony. Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold.
Pagina 113 - Alas! you know the cause too well, The salt is spilt, to me it fell. Then, to contribute to my loss, My knife and fork were laid across, On friday too! the day I dread! Would I were safe at home in bed! Last night (I vow to Heav'n 'tis true) Bounce from the fire a coffin flew. Next post some fatal news shall tell. God send my Cornish friends be well...
Pagina 106 - If so, my friend, pray let her take A second turn into the lake, And, rather than your patience lose, Thrice and again repeat the dose. No brawling wives, no furious wenches, No fire so hot, but water quenches.
Pagina 183 - Nor less amus'd have I, quiescent, watch'd The sooty films that play upon the bars, Pendulous, and foreboding, in the view Of superstition, prophesying still, Though still deceiv'd, some stranger's near approach.
Pagina 94 - But, if ever the duke return, (as our prayers are he may,) let me desire you to 1 clack-dish:} The beggars, two or three centuries ago, used to proclaim their want by a wooden dish with a moveable cover, which they clacked, to show that their vessel was empty.

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