The British Novelists: With an Essay, and Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, Volume 11,Deel 3

Voorkant
F. C. and J. Rivington, 1820
 

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Pagina 231 - A blank, my lord. She never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm i...
Pagina 374 - Tell me, O thou whom my soul loveth, where thou feedest, where thou makest thy flock to rest at noon: for why should I be as one that turneth aside by the flocks of thy companions ? 8 If thou know not, O thou fairest among women, go thy way forth by the footsteps of the flock, and feed thy kids beside the shepherds
Pagina 374 - BECAUSE of the savour of thy good ointments thy name is as ointment poured forth, therefore do the virgins love thee. Draw me, we will run after thee: the king hath brought me into his chambers. We will be glad and rejoice in thee, we will remember thy love more than wine : the upright love thee.
Pagina 390 - He was to undergo another severe operation on the next day after the letters came from Bologna, the success of which was very doubtful. How nobly does Sir Charles appear to support himself under such heavy afflictions! for those of his friends were ever his. But his heart bleeds in secret for them. A feeling heart is a blessing that no one, who has it, would be without ; and it is a moral security of innocence ; since the heart that is able to partake of the distress of another, cannot wilfully give...
Pagina 231 - But let concealment, like a worm i' th' bud, Feed on her damask cheek : she pined in thought ; And, with a green and yellow melancholy, She sat like Patience on a monument, Smiling at grief.
Pagina 374 - Look not upon me, because I am black, Because the sun hath looked upon me : My mother's children were angry with me ; They made me the keeper of the vineyards : But mine own vineyard have I not kept.
Pagina 242 - minuter discriminations," a good example being the following treatment of Sir Charles's alterations at Grandison Hall: He has a great taste . . . yet not an expensive one; for he studies situation and convenience, and pretends not to level hills, or to force and distort nature; but to help it, as he finds it, without letting art be seen in his works, where he can possibly avoid it.

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