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pearance I concluded he was a scaman. When Peter saw me, he came and saluted me; and as I was returning his civility, he took me aside, and pointing to his companion, said, “ do you see that man? I was just thinking of bringe ing him to you.' " He should have been very welcome (I answered) on your account. • And on his own too (he replied) if you knew the man. For no one alive can give a more copious account of unknown countries, which I know you love.' Then (said I) I did not guess amiss, for I took him for a seaman. • But you are much mistaken (he said), for he hath been no Palinurus, but another Ulysses, or rather a Plato.'

- This Raphael, whose family name is Hythloday, is not ignorant of Latin, but is eminently skilled in the Greek; having applied himself more particularly to the latter, because he had devoted himself to philosophy, in which he knew the Romans have left us nothing valuable but what is to be found in Seneca and Cicero. He is a Portuguese by birth, and was so desirous of seeing the world, that he divided his estate among his brothers, and shared the hazards of Americus Vesputius, in three of his four voyages, now published. He did not return in the last, but obtained his leave almost by force, to be one of the twenty-four who were left at the farthest place at which they touched in their last voyage to New Castile.

• Leaving him thus, did not a little gratify one who was sonder of travelling, than of returning to be buried in his own country. For he would often sayı the way to heaven is the same from all places, and who hath no grave hath heaven still over him. Yet this disposition had cost him dear, had not God been very gracious to him. After he had travelled, with five Castilians, over many countries, at last, by strange good fortune, he got to Ceylon, and thence to Calicut, where he very fortunately found some Portuguese ships, and, beyond all expectation, returned to his country,

I thanked Peter for his kindness, in intending to bring me acquainted with one whose conversation he knew would be so agreeable to me, and on this Raphael and I embraced. After the usual civilities, we all went to my house, and en. tering the garden, seated ourselves on a green bank and en. tertained each other in discourse.

He told us, when Vesputius had sailed, he and his com. panions who staid in New Castile, by degrees insinuated themselves into the affections of the natives, meeting them often, and treating them kindly. At last they not only lived among them without danger, but held familiar intercourse with them; and so far obtained the friendship of a prince (whose name and country I have forgotten) that he furnished them plentifully with all necessaries, and even with the conveniencies of travelling-boats and waggons. He gave them a very faithful guide, who was to introduce and recommend them to such other princes as they had a mind to see; and after travelling many days, they came to towns,

cities, and commonwealths, which were both happily governed and well peopled.

About the equator, as far on either side as the sun goeth, lay vast deserts, parched by his perpetual heat. The soil was withered ; every thing looked dismal; all places were uninhabited or abounded in wild beasts and serpents, with a few men neither less wild nor less cruel than the beasts. But as they proceeded, a new scene presented itself. Nature wore a milder aspect, the air was less burning, the soi more verdant, and even the beasts less wild. At last they found nations, towns, and cities, which had not only mutual and neighbourly intercourse, but traded by sea and land to very remote countries.

· The first vessels they saw were flat-bottomed, with sails of reeds and wicker woven closely together, and some of leather. Afterward they met with ships having round keels and canvas sails, like our own, and the seamen understood astronomy and navigation. He obtained their favour greatly by shewing them the needle, with which, till then, they were unacquainted. Formerly they sailed with extreme caution, and only in summer. Now they esteem all seasons alike, and trust wholly to the loadstone, in which plan there is perhaps more imaginary security than real safety ; and this discovery, promising so much advantage, may, by their imprudence, become a source of great mischief to them.

own country. For he would often sayı the way to heaven is the same from all places, and who hath no grave hath heaven still over him. Yet this disposition had cost him dear, had not God been very gracious to him. After he had travelled, with five Castilians, over many countries, at last, by strange good fortune, he got to Ceylon, and thence to Calicut, where he very fortunately found some Portu. guese ships, and, beyond all expectation, returned to his country,

I thanked Peter for his kindness, in intending to bring me acquainted with one whose conversation he knew would be so agreeable to me, and on this Raphael and I embraced. After the usual civilities, we all went to my house, and en. tering the garden, seated ourselves on a green bank and ens tertained each other in discourse.

He told us, when Vesputius had sailed, he and his com. panions who staid in New Castile, by degrees insinuated themselves into the affections of the natives, meeting them often, and treating them kindly. At last they not only lived among them without danger, but held familiar intercourse with them ; and so far obtained the friendship of a prince (whose name and country I have forgotten) that he furnished them plentifully with all necessaries, and even with the conveniencies of travelling-boats and waggons. He gave them a very faithful guide, who was to introduce and recommend them to such other princes as they had a mind to see; and after travelling many days, they came to towns,

keities, and commonwealths, which were both happily governed and well peopled.

About the equator, as far on either side as the sun goeth, lay vast deserts, parched by his perpetual heat. The soil was withered; every thing looked dismal; all places were uninhabited or abounded in wild beasts and serpents, with a few men neither less wild nor less cruel than the beasts. But as they proceeded, a new scene presented itself. Nature wore a milder aspect, the air was less burning, the soil more verdant, and even the beasts less wild. At last they found nations, towns, and cities, which had not only mutual and neighbourly intercourse, but traded by sea and land to very remote countries.

· The first vessels they saw were fat-bottomed, with sails of reeds and wicker woven closely together, and some of leather. Afterward they met with ships having round keels and canvas sails, like our own, and the seamen understood astronomy and navigation. He obtained their favour greatly by shewing them the needle, with which, till then, they were unacquainted. Formerly they sailed with extreme caution, and only in summer. Now they esteem all sea. sons alike, and trust wholly to the loadstone, in which plan there is perhaps more imaginary security than real safety ; and this discovery, promising so much advantage, may, by their imprudence, become a source of great mischief to them.

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