Religious Identities in Henry VIII's England

Voorkant
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2006 - 291 pagina's
Henry VIII's decision to declare himself supreme head of the church in England, and thereby set himself in opposition to the authority of the papacy, had momentous consequences for the country and his subjects. At a stroke people were forced to reconsider assumptions about their identity and loyalties, in rapidly shifting political and theological circumstances. Whilst many studies have investigated Catholic and Protestant identities during the reigns of Elizabeth and Mary, much less is understood about the processes of religious identity-formation during Henry's reign. In this volume Peter Marshall explores a wide range of evidence that underlines the complex web of overlapping and competing identities that people were forced to assume as a religiously conservative king sought to take control of his national church. Investigating broad issues of conversion, polemic and propaganda, scripture, exile, forgery and miracles, ...
 

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Inhoudsopgave

Evangelical Conversion
19
Fear Purgatory and Polemic
43
The Shooting of Robert Packington
61
The Debate Over Unwritten Verities
81
The Other Black Legend
103
Forgery and Miracles
125
Mumpsimus and Sumpsimus
157
Is the Pope a Catholic?
169
The Burning of John Forest
199
Catholic Exiles
227
List of Henrician Catholic Exiles
263
Select Bibliography
277
Index
285
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Over de auteur (2006)

Peter Marshall is Reader in History at the University of Warwick, UK.

Bibliografische gegevens