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APPENDIX II

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TRANSFER OF RECORDS TO THE

NATIONAL ARCHIVES

Whereas section 3 of the “Act to establish a National Archives of the United States Government, and for other purposes” (48 Stat. 1122– 1124), provides that “All archives or records belonging to the Government of the United States (legislative, executive, judicial, and other) shall be under the charge and superintendence of the Archivist to this extent: He shall have full power to inspect personally or by deputy the records of any agency of the United States Government whatsoever and wheresoever located, and shall have the full cooperation of any and all persons in charge of such records in such inspections, and to requisition for transfer to the National Archives Establishment such archives, or records as the National Archives Council, hereafter provided shall approve for such transfer”;

And whereas section 6 of said act creates the National Archives Council and authorizes it to define the classes of material which shall be transferred to the National Archives Building and establish regulations governing such transfer": Therefore be it

Resolved, That the Archivist of the United States be and he is hereby authorized to requisition for transfer to The National Archives any archives or records in the custody of any agency of the United States Government (legislative, executive, judicial, and other), which fall within any of the following classes, viz:

I. Any archives or records (a) which the head of the agency in custody of · them may deem not to be necessary for use in the conduct of the regular current business of said agency; (b) which he may consider to be in such physical condition that they cannot be used without danger of damage to them; and (c) for which, in his opinion, he is unable to provide adequate or safe storage.

11. Any archives or records of any Federal agency that has gone out of existence unless its functions have been transferred to the agency which has custody of its records.

III. Any other archives or records which the National Archives Council by special resolution, or which the head of the agency in custody of them for special reasons, may authorize to be transferred to The National Archives.

Resolved further, (1) That when the head of any agency of the Government of the United States shall determine that any archives or records in his custody fall within class I as defined above, he shall cause to be furnished to the Archivist of the United States a descriptive list of such archives or records, which shall thereupon become subject to requisition by the Archivist for transfer to The National Archives; (2) that when the Archivist shall issue his requisition for any archives or records he shall furnish to a duly authorized repre

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Resolutions of the National Archives Council defining the classes of material to be transferred to The National Archives and establishing regulations governing the transfer of such material, adopted Feb. 10, 1936.

sentative of the agency that has custody of them an identification inventory of the material covered by such requisition and this inventory shall be verified and agreed to by the representative of said agency before such archives or records shall be transferred to the Archivist; (3) that when such verification has been completed and certified to on the inventory form by the signatures of the representatives of said agency and of the Archivist of the United States, respectively, such archives or records shall be delivered by the representative of said agency either to the representative of the Archivist of the United States at the depository in which they are stored for transfer to The National Archives, or to a representative of the Archivist of the United States at the National Archives Building; Provided, That all such archives or records shall pass into the legal custody of the Archivist of the United States when, and not until, they have been either delivered to his representative for loading on the trucks of The National Archives or delivered to and accepted by a representative of the Archivist at the National Archives Building.

APPENDIX III

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE USE AND TEMPORARY WITH

DRAWAL OF RECORDS IN THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES

RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE USE OF RECORDS IN THE CUSTODY OF THE ARCHIVIST OF THE UNITED STATES, PROMULGATED BY THE ARCHIVIST, DECEMBER 18, 1936

1. Persons desiring to use records in the custody of the Archivist of the United States must apply to the Archivist for admission to the search rooms, using the form provided for that purpose, and may be required to submit an acceptable letter of introduction. If the applicant is a minor, his application must be approved by his parent or guardian. An applicant who is not a citizen of the United States may Le required to present a letter of introduction from the embassy or legation of his country. A group of persons desiring to view motion pictures or hear sound recordings must be represented by an authorized spokesman, who in making application for admission must give the identity of the group he represents.

2. If the application is approved a card of admission will be issued. An admission card is not transferable and must be produced when required. It is valid for six months from date of issue and may be renewed upon application.

3. The search rooms and the auditorium are open from 9:00 a. m. to 4:30 p. m., except on Saturdays, when they are open from 9:00 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. They are not open on Sundays and legal holidays.

4. Requisitions for records must be made on the forms provided for that purpose, signed by the searcher, and presented to the attendant in charge of the control desk in the central search room.

5. Persons desiring to view motion pictures must fill out the form provided for that purpose at least one day in advance of the time service is desired. On receipt and approval of this application a time will be fixed for the screening and the applicant will be notified thereof.

6. When the searcher has completed his use of records he must notify an attendant. The searcher is responsible for all records turned over to him until an attendant returns the canceled requisition.

7. The greatest care must be exercised in the use of all records and books. They must not be leaned upon, written upon, or in any way damaged. No tracing is permitted, and ink must not be used in the search rooms.

8. The use of records of exceptional value or in fragile condition shall be subject to such special regulations as the Archivist may deem necessary for their protection.

9. No records, books, or other property of The National Archives may be taken from the search rooms except by members of the staff.

10. Requests for reproduction of records must be presented to the Chief of the Division of Reference on forms provided for the purpose.

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11. No overcoats, umbrellas, canes, cameras, or traveling bags may be taken into the search rooms or the auditorium.

12. The use of tobacco, the lighting of matches, and eating in the search rooms, the auditorium, or any other areas in which archival materials are in use or in temporary or permanent storage are strictly prohibited.

13. The privilege of admission to the search rooms may be withdrawn for any violation of these rules and regulations, for disregarding the authority of the attendants in charge, or for offensive conduct.

14. Any case of incivility on the part of an attendant or of unsatisfactory service should be reported in writing to the chief of the division concerned.

REGULATION GOVERNING THE TEMPORARY WITHDRAWAL BY AGENCIES OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT OF MATERIAL DEPOSITED IN THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES BUILDING, PROMULGATED BY THE ARCHIVIST OF THE UNITED STATES, JANUARY 26, 1937

Public records in the custody of the Archivist may, with his approval, be withdrawn from the National Archives Building temporarily, for official use, by any agency of the Government of the United States. All applications for permission to withdraw records from the National Archives Building shall be made in writing on forms furnished by the Archivist. Such forms shall be signed by the head of the agency making application or, in his name, by his representative, thereunto duly authorized.

APPENDIX IV

BOOKS AND ARTICLES PUBLISHED, PAPERS READ, AND ADDRESSES

DELIVERED BY MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES STAFF DURING THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1937

DOROTHY ARBAUGH, cataloger in the Division of Cataloging.
Notes on Progress at The National Archives. Address before a

meeting of the Ohio Valley Regional Group of Catalogers,

Bloomington, Ind., May 15, 1937. The National Archives. Address before a class in history of the

Laboratory School of Indiana State Teachers College, Terre

Haute, Ind., May 18, 1937. NELSON M. BLAKE, deputy examiner in the Division of Accessions. The Life and Work of General William Mahone of Virginia. Ad

dress before students in arts and sciences of the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Va., March 22, 1937, and before the Beverly Manor Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution,

Staunton, Va., March 23, 1937. The Organization and Work of The National Archives. Address

before students in arts and sciences of the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Va., March 22, 1937, and before the history students and faculty of Mary Baldwin College, Staunton, Va.,

March 23, 1937. John G. BRADLEY, Chief of the Division of Motion Pictures and

Sound Recordings. Report of the Committee on Preservation of Film, Society of Mo

tion Picture Engineers. Journal of the Society, 27: 147–154

(Aug. 1936). Foreword to “Stability of Motion Picture Films as Determined by

Accelerated Aging", by J. R. Hill and C. G. Weber. Journal of

the Society of Motion Picture Engineers, 27: 678 (Dec. 1936). Recording History in Three Dimensions. Pan American Institute

of Geography and History, Proceedings of the Second General Assembly (Washington, 1937), 403-410. Motion Picture Archives. Address before the Washington Chap

ter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Washington, D. C., February 3, 1937. Mexico. Address before the Chevy Chase Lions Club, Chevy Chase,

Md., March 16, 1937. Into Old Mexico by Auto. Recorded as a talking book for the American Foundation for the Blind, New York, May 12, 1937.

. Changing Aspects of the Film Storage Problem. Paper read be

fore the Society of Motion Picture Engineers, Hollywood, Calif., May 27, 1937, and before the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer laboratory staff, Culver City, Calif., June 1, 1937.

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