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ascertain and classify the possible uses of the various materials in The National Archives. In the acquisition of equipment, it was necessary to investigate thoroughly the offerings of various manufacturers. Among the larger pieces of equipment acquired were a highintensity, mercury-vapor lamp, a circular, cold-quartz lamp, a rotary card-copying machine especially designed for photographing multicolored cards, a projection reading machine, a miniature camera and accessories, an 8" x 10" enlarger, a paper cutter, a paper-drilling machine, a direct-image typewriter, a plan-copying machine, a boundvolume copying camera, and a reflex camera.

The reproduction of colored documents in monochrome and in color has been investigated, and the data accumulated may also be applied in reproducing faded and washed-out documents. The use of infrared sensitive materials in the reproduction of charred and burned documents was studied with some success, and the investigations are being continued.

Studies were undertaken in low-cost methods of producing a limited number of copies of documents needed for current use by the staff of The National Archives. Several methods were tested and samples were procured, but no definite decision has yet been made as to the most suitable process.

OTHER ACTIVITIES

As a member of a committee of the Federal Fire Council, the Chief of the Division attended several conferences and prepared material on fires and on the photographic restoration of damaged documents. He was appointed on the committee on photographic equipment and mechanical techniques of the Society of American Archivists, and he represented the Society at the organization meeting of the American Documentation Institute. He was also appointed adviser to the committee on terminology and to the committee on photographic reproduction of library materials of the American Library Association. The latter committee is actively engaged in investigating microphotography and its application to the work of libraries, archival establishments, and similar institutions. A large number of conferences were held with members of this committee to discuss equipment, procedure, and results; and in addition a report on reading equipment for microcopies was prepared for the committee and assistance was rendered in compiling a vocabulary on microcopying.

The Chief of the Division read papers on microphotography before the New York Chapter of the Special Libraries Association and at the annual meeting of the American Library Association, and he gave an extemporaneous talk on microphotography and The National Archives before the Harvard University Library Club. From October 19 to November 7, 1936, he made an inspection tour of the libraries of Yale, Brown, and Harvard Universities, where documentary problems ap

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TIVES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN CONGRESS
ASSEMBLED, two thirds of both Houses de

That con
the following Articles be proposed to the Legillatus of the several
States, as Amendments to the Confitution of the Unued States, all
or any of which Articles, when atified by three foarts of the faid
Legillatures, to be valid to al dents and purpotes as part of the
faid Conftitution-Viz.

ARTICLES in addition to, andamendment of the Conllitution of
the United States of America, proposed by Congress, and rantied
by the Legislatures of the feveral States, pursuant to the fifili Arti
cle of the onginal Conftitution.

ARTICLE THE FIRST. After the first enumeration, required by the first Anicle of the Conftitution, there hall.bane Repretentative for everything thoufand, until the number thall amount to one hundred, sound arninImport the proportion shall be fo regulated by Jongres, that there

hall
be not less than one hundred Representes, nor less than one Re-
presentative for every forty thousand lons, until the number of
Representatives fhall amount to two bhdred, after which the pro-
portion shall be so regulated by Congre khat there hall not be less
than two hundred Reprefentatives, not lethan one Representative
for every fifty thousand perlon.
ARTICLE, IWE SEC
for the browse the Pinders Representation ullatt.

&
No law varying the compenlation to the member of fagmeter,
shall take elicet, unul an election of Representatives shall have in-
tervened.

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ARTICLE THE THIRD
Congress shall make no law establillain getiring met het them
en for usiferents es Handle

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4 rlikes of ov a modernesha, , the price benifi f'ladigan

ARTICLE THE FOURTH. Congo mult mahina Lain a milliy

The Freedom of speech of the Prels, and color tiglit.of the

People peaceably to assemble pelation and to return the Government for a redress oh.grievanceo, come

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THE FIRST AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION AS PROPOSED BY THE HOUSE

OF REPRESENTATIVES The House of Representatives of the First Congress proposed a series of amendments to the Constitution in the nature of a bill of rights and submitted its proposal, containing 17 articles, to the Senate for consideration. A printed copy of this proposal, showing notations written by an unknown hand, is repro. duced on this and the two following pages. The document is from files of the United States Senate now in the custody of the Archivist of the United States.

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SECOND PAGE OF THE HOUSE DRAFT OF THE FIRST AMENDMENTS TO THE

CONSTITUTION

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THIRD PAGE OF THE HOUSE DRAFT OF THE FIRST AMENDMENTS TO THE

CONSTITUTION

The Conventions of a Number of the Slales haring, at live Time of

their adopting the Constitution, expreffed a Defore, in Order to pre
2 ent miscontruction or abuse of its Powers, that further declaratory
and reflrulive Claufes frould be added: And as extending the Ground
of public Confidence in the Government, will best insure the beneficent
ends of its hftitution
ESOLVED, BY THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVISOR

,
thirds of bosh Houses concurring, That the following articles be proposed
in the Legislatures of the les cral States, as amendments to the Constitution
of the United States, all or any of which articles, when ratified by three
Tourihs of the said Legidatures, to be valid to all intents and purposes, 25
part of the said Contuution-Viz,

ARTICLES in addition to, and amendment of the Conftitution of the United
States of America, propused by Congress, and rathed by the Legiflatures
of the several States, pursuant to the fifth Article of the original Constitutici.

ARTICLE THE FIRST.
After the fun erruneration, required by the firft article of the Constituti-
on, there shall be ong Representative fasery thirty, thouland, until the
number shall aindont to one hundred; to White mumber one Repic

catative
Shall be added for every subsequent increase of forty thoufand, until the
Reprefentanvc ball amount to Lo hundred, to w

rone Repos ve hall be added

I thous

ARTICLE THE SECOND.
No law, Jarying the compensation for the services of the Senators and
Beprcionatives that take effect, until an deđion of Reprefentatives fall
havc intcrvened.

ARTICI E THE TIIRD.
Congress Nu make no law eltabhaing articles of lith, or a mode of
worfhip, or probines the free exercise religan, oralinding the free-
dom of speech, or of the prels, or the right one people peace holy to allem-
ble, and to petition to the govore nent for a redicul grievances.

ARTICLE THE FOURTH.
A well regulated militia, being neeellary to the security of a free State,
the right of the people to kecp and bear arpas, shall not be infringed.

ARTICLE THE FIETH.
No foldier Chall, in time of peace, le quartered in any house, without
the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be De
fcribed by law.

ARTICLE THE SIXTH.
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, house papers, and
ff.cis, againit unrearonable searches and suizures, shall not be vielased and

Larrants fall illue, but upon probable caule, lurperied by oath or air-
natin, and particularly describing the place to buicasched, and the persons
A things to leizd.

The First AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION AS CONSIDERED BY THE SENATE

The Senate reduced the number of articles in the first amendments as proposed by the House of Representatives from 17 to 12. In the draft reproduced on this page and the next, 9 articles are, aside from capitalization and punctuation, the same as those finally submitted to the States for ratification; the remaining 3 articles, which have been crossed out in this draft, were modified somewhat in the final draft sent to the States. The document is from files of the United States Senate now in the custody of the Archivist of the United States.

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