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fitness of men in general for power, became more and more attached to the prerogatives of monarchy. From Calvinisni with a still decreasing respect for Fathers, Councils, and for Church-Antiquity in general, Milton seems to have ended in an indifference, if not a dislike, to all forms of ecclesiastic government, and to have retreated wholly into the inward and spiritual church-communion of his own spirit with the Light, that lighteth every man that cometh into the world. Taylor, with a growing reverence for authority, au increasing sense of the insufficiency of the Scriptures without the aids of tradition and the cousent of authorized interpreters, advanced as far in his approaches (not indeed to Popery, but) to Roman-Catholicism, as a conscientious miuister of the English Church could well venture. Milton would be, and would utter the same, to all, on all occasions; he would tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. Taylor would become all things to all men, if by any means he might benefit any; hence he availed himself, in his popular writings, of opinious and representations which stand often in striking contrast with the doubts and convictions expressed in his more philosophical works. He appears, indeed, not too severely to have blamed that management of truth (istam falsitatem dispensativam) authorized and exemplified by alınost all the fathers: Integrum omnino doctoribus et cælus Christiani autistitibus esse, ut dolos versent, falsa veris intermisceant et imprimis religionis hostes fallant, duminodo veritatis commodis et utilitati inserviant.

The same antithesis might be carried on with the elements of their several intellectual powers. Milton, austere, condensed, imaginative, supporting his truth by direct enunciation of moral lofty sentiment and by distinct visual representations, and in the same spirit overwhelming what he deemed falsehood by moral denunciation and a succession of pictures appalling or repulsive. In his prose, su many metaphors, so many allegorical miniatures. Taylor, eminently discursive, accuinulative, and (to use one of his own words) agglomerative; still more rich in images than Milton himself, but images of funcy and presented to the common and passive eye, rather than to the eye of the imagination. Whether supporting or assailing, he makes his way either by argument or by appeals to the affectious,

TRANSLATED FROM SCHILLER.*

I. THE HOMERIC HEXAMETER DESCRIBED AND

EXEMPLIFIED.

STRONGLY it bears us along in swelling and

limitless billows, Nothing before and nothing behind but the sky and

the Ocean.

II. THE OVIDIAN ELEGIAC METRE DESCRIBED AND

EXEMPLIFIED.

IN
N the hexameter rises the fountain's silvery co-

lumn;
In the pentameter aye falling in melody back.

IV.

TO THE YOUNG ARTIST, KAYSER OR

KASERWERTH. KAYSER! to whom, as to a second self,

Nature, or Nature's next-of-kin, the Elf, Hight Genius, hath dispensed the happy skill To cheer or soothe the parting friend's alas ! Turning the blank scroll to a magic glass, That makes the absent present at our will ; And to the shadowing of thy pencil gives Such seeming substance, that it almost lives :

Well hast thou given the thoughtful Poet's face !
Yet hast thou on the tablet of his mind
A more delightful portrait left behind
Ev'n thy own youthful beauty, and artless grace,

* See note at the end of the volume.

Thy natural gladness and eyes bright with glee !

Kayser! farewell!
Be wise ! be happy, and forget not me.

JOB'S LUCK.
SLY Beelzebub took all occasions

To try Job's constancy and patience;
He took his honors, took his health,
He took his children, took his wealth,

His camels, horses, asses, cows-
And the sly Devil did not take his spouse.

But Heaven that brings out good from evil,
And loves to disappoint the Devil,
Had predetermined to restore
Twofold all Job had before,

His children, camels, horses, cows-
Short-sighted Devil, not to take his spouse !

ON A VOLUNTEER SINGER. SWANS sing before they die: 'twere no bad

thing,
Should certain persons die before they sing.

ON AN INSIGNIFICANT.

'TIS Cypher lies beneath this crust,

Whom Death created into dust.

PROFUSE KINDNESS.
Νήπιοι, ούς ίσασιν όσο πλέον ήμισυ πάντως.-Hesiod.

a spring-tide of Love to dear friends in

a shoal ! Half of it to one were worth double the whole!

WHAT

CHARITY IN THOUGHT To praise men as good, and to take them for

such, Is a grace, which no soul can mete out to a

tittle ;Of which he who has not a little too much, Will by Charity's gauge surely have much too

little.

HUMILITY THE MOTHER OF CHARITY. FRAIL creatures are we all! To be the best,

Is but the fewest faults to have :-
Look thou then to thyself, and leave the rest

To God, thy conscience, and the grave.

ON AN INFANT

WHICH DIED BEFORE BAPTISM.

“ BE, rather than be called, a child of God,”

Death whispered! with assenting nod. Its head upon its mother's breast,

The Baby bowed, without demurOf the kingdom of the Blest

Possessor, not inheritor,

ON

BERKELEY AND FLORENCE COLERIDGE.

WHO DIED ON THE 16TH OF JANUARY, 1834.* O FRAIL as sweet! twin buds, too rathe to bear

The Winter's unkind air;
O gifts beyond all price, no sooner given

Than straight required by Heaven;
Matched jewels, vainly for a moment lent

To deck my brow, or sent
Untainted from the earth, as Christ's, to soar

And add two spirits more
To that dread band seraphic, that doth lie

Beneath the Almighty's eye ;-
Glorious the thought !-yet ah! my babes, ah! still

A father's heart ye fill ;
Though cold ye lie in earth—though gentle death

Hath suck'd your balmy breath,
And the last kiss which your fair cheeks I gave

Is buried in yon grave.
No tears—no tears—I wish them not again ;

To die for them was gain,
Ere Doubt, or Fear, or Woe, or act of Sin

Had marred God's light within.

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