Poetry for Repetition

Couverture
Henry Twells
Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts, 1862 - 226 pages
 

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Table des matières

The Hour of Prayer Mrs Hemans
137
Ye Mariners of England Campbell
138
The Visible Creation J Montgomery
139
From Greenlands Icy Mountains Bishop Heber
141
Alls for the best Tupper
142
Music T Moore
143
My Library Southey
144
The Trumpet Mrs Hemans
146
The Dog and the Waterlilies Cowper
147
Morning Keble
148
The Deathbed T Hood
151
The Seasons Bishop Heber
152
Charles the Twelfth Dr Johnson
156
What is Prayer ? J Montgomery
157
The Village Alehouse Goldsmith
159
The Star of Bethlehem Kirke White
161
On a distant Prospect of Eton College Gray
162
Adams Account of his Creation Milton
165
The Wild Gazelle Lord Byron
166
The Armada Lord Macaulay
167
The Glory of God Bishop Heber
170
Cardinal Wolseys Speech to T Cromwell Shakespeare
172
The Beauties of Creation T Moore
173
The Death of the Flowers W C Bryant
174
Love of our Country Sir W Scott
175
On the Receipt of my Mothers Picture Cowper
176
Mercy Shakespeare
180
A Psalm of Life Longfellow
181
The Cross Roads Southey
182
Hymn of the Hebrew Maid Sir W Scott
186
Eves Lament on her Expulsion from Paradise Milton
187
Newspapers Crabbe
188
Ginevra
190
Rogers
192
Death Blair
193
Light for All R Gilfillan
194
The King envying the Peasant Shakespeare
195
The Voice of Spring Mrs Hemans
197
Eves Conjugal Love Milton
200
Christmas Sir W Scott
201
Reflections of King Hezekiah in his Sickness Mrs H More
204
The Mysteries of Providence Cowper
205
Solitude Lord Byron
206
The Fame of Horatius Cocles Lord Macaulay
212
God the only Comforter T Moore
213
Human Life Rogers
214
Expulsion of Adam and Eve from Paradise Milton
216
Thou art gone to the Grave Bishop Heber
217
An English Peasant Crabbe
219
Coronach Sir W Scott
221
The Slaves Dream Longfellow
222
On the Death of Henry Kirke White Lord Byron
223
Morning Hymn of Adam and Eve in Paradise Milton
224

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Fréquemment cités

Page 195 - Ye fearful saints, fresh courage take, The clouds ye so much dread Are big with mercy, and shall break In blessings on your head.
Page 86 - The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea, The ploughman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world to darkness and to me. Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight, And all the air a solemn stillness holds, Save where the beetle wheels his droning flight, And drowsy tinklings lull the distant folds...
Page 196 - To sit on rocks, to muse o'er flood and fell, To slowly trace the forest's shady scene, . Where things that own not man's dominion dwell, And mortal foot hath ne'er or rarely been ; To climb the trackless mountain all unseen, With the wild flock that never needs a fold ; Alone o'er steeps and foaming falls to lean ; This is not solitude ; 'tis but to hold Converse with nature's charms, and view her stores unroll'd.
Page 5 - IT was a summer evening, Old Kaspar's work was done, And he before his cottage door Was sitting in the sun; And by him sported on the green His little grandchild Wilhelmine. She saw her brother Peterkin Roll something large and round Which he beside the rivulet In playing there had found; He came to ask what he had found That was so large and smooth and round. Old Kaspar took it from the boy Who stood expectant by; And then the old man shook his head, And with a natural sigh "Tis some poor fellow's...
Page 25 - I REMEMBER, I REMEMBER I REMEMBER, I remember The house where I was born, The little window where the sun Came peeping in at morn ; He never came a wink too soon, Nor brought too long a day, But now I often wish the night Had borne my breath away ! I remember, I remember...
Page 134 - MY days among the Dead are past; Around me I behold, Where'er these casual eyes are cast, The mighty minds of old: My never-failing friends are they, With whom I converse day by day.
Page 79 - Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride, And e'en his failings leaned to virtue's side ; But in his duty prompt at every call, He watched and wept, he prayed and felt for all; And, as a bird each fond endearment tries To tempt its new-fledged offspring to the skies, He tried each art, reproved each dull delay, Allured to brighter worlds, and led the way.
Page 200 - tis his will : Let but the commons hear this testament, (Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read) And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds, And dip their napkins in his sacred blood ; Yea, beg a hair of him for memory, And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it, as a rich legacy, Unto their issue.
Page 123 - Last noon beheld them full of lusty life, Last eve in Beauty's circle proudly gay, The midnight brought the signal-sound of strife, The morn the marshalling in arms, — the day Battle's...
Page 211 - He is gone on the mountain, He is lost to the forest, Like a summer-dried fountain, When our need was the sorest. The font, reappearing, From the rain-drops shall borrow, But to us comes no cheering, To Duncan no morrow ! The hand of the reaper Takes the ears that are hoary, But the voice of the weeper Wails manhood in glory. The autumn winds rushing Waft the leaves that are searcst, But our flower was in flushing, When blighting was nearest.

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