Sandgate as a residence for invalids

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John Churchill, 1853 - 136 pagina's

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Pagina 100 - Yet if my name were liable to fear, I do not know the man I should avoid So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much ; He is a great observer, and he looks Quite through the deeds of men : he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony ; he hears no music : Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort, As if he mock'd himself, and scorn'd his spirit That could be mov'd to smile at any thing. Such men as he be never at heart's ease, Whiles they behold a greater than themselves, And therefore are they very...
Pagina 100 - Let me have men about me that are fat ; Sleek-headed men, and such as sleep o' nights. Yond' Cassius has a lean and hungry look ; He thinks too much : such men are dangerous.
Pagina 129 - I counted the perspiratory pores on the palm of the hand, and found 3528 in a square inch. Now, each of these pores being the aperture of a little tube of about a quarter of an inch long, it follows that in a square inch of skin on the palm of the hand, there exists a length of tube equal to 882 inches, or 73i feet.
Pagina 75 - ... in a purer air. Nor is this the only evil arising from sleeping in illventilated [apartments. When it is known that the blood undergoes most important changes in its circulation through the lungs, by means of the air which we breathe, and that these vital changes can only be effected by the respiration of pure air, it will be easily understood how the healthy functions of the lungs must be impeded by inhaling, for many successive hours, the vitiated air of our bed-rooms, and how the health must...
Pagina 95 - ... continued to eat till both it and the gullet were inordinately distended. In this, however, the dog was evidently impelled solely by the gratification of the sense of taste; for on removing the food at the beginning of the experiment to the distance of even a few inches, it looked on with indifference, and made no attempt either to follow the dish or to prevent its removal. " Precisely similar results ensued when the nervous communication between the stomach and brain was arrested by the administration...
Pagina 93 - The sensation of hunger is commonly referred to the stomach, and that of thirst to the upper part of the throat and back of the mouth; and correctly enough to this extent, that a certain condition of the stomach and throat tends to produce them. But, in reality, the sensations themselves, like all other mental affections and emotions, have their seat in the brain, to which a sense of the condition of the stomach is conveyed through the medium of the nerves. In this respect, Appetite resembles the...
Pagina 67 - The more common and more injurious deviations from that system of living which an invalid ought to adopt, consist in errors of diet ; exposure to cold ; over-fatigue, and excitement in what is called " sight-seeing ;" frequenting crowded and over-heated rooms; keeping late hours, &c. Many cases fell under my observation, in which climate promised the greatest advantage, but where its beneficial influence was counteracted by the injurious operation of these causes.
Pagina 93 - ... one than of the others. Thus, the cause which excites the sensation of colour, is certain rays of light striking upon the nerve of the eye ; and the cause which excites the perception of sound, is the atmospherical vibrations striking upon the nerve of the ear ; but the sensations themselves take place in the brain, to which, as the organ of the mind, the respective impressions are conveyed. In like manner, the cause which excites appetite is an impression made on the nerves of the stomach ;...
Pagina 99 - ... many errors and inaccuracies, or of so good a proof of the fertility and vivacity of my fancy. The fact is, that every hour in the day is my hour for study, and that a minute rarely passes, in which I am absolutely idle ; in short, I never do nothing. Nature has given me the hereditary blessing of a constitutional and habitual temperance, that revolts against excess of any sort, and never suffers appetite to load the frame ; I am accordingly as fit to resume my book or my pen the instant after...
Pagina 74 - Their small size and their lowness render them very unhealthy, and the case is rendered worse by close windows and thick curtains and hangings, with which the beds are often so carefully surrounded as to prevent the possibility of the air being renewed. The consequence is, that we are breathing vitiated air during the greater part of the night, that is, during more than a third part of our lives...

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