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AMCLD-TT
SUBJECT: Additional One-Ting Response to GAO Technology Transfer
Questionnaito

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S. If you have questions concerning this matter, please call my office on AUTOVON 290-4210 or COMMERCIAL (202) 394-4210.

Encis

Clippor & Sanham
CL
Army Domestic Techsology

Transfer Program Manager

DISTRIBUTION:

(see separate pago)

2

AMCLD-TT
SUBJECT: Additional One-Time Response to GAO Technology Transfer
Questions

DISTRIBUTION:
Commander,

U.S. Army Research Institute for the Rehavioral & Social Sciences
Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory
Construction Engineering Research Laboratory
Enginees Topographic Laboratories
waterways Experiment Station
Aeromedical Research Laboratory
Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense
Institute of Dental Research
Institute of Surgical Research
Lottorman Army Institute of Rosearch
Biomedical Research & Development Laboratory
Research Institute of Infectious Diseases
Research Institute of Environmental Medicine
Maltor Raed Asmy Institute of Research
Acament Research, Development & Engineering Center
Chemical Research, Development & Engineering Center
Aviation Applied Technology Directorate
Missile Research, Development & Engineering Center
Belvoir Research, Development & Engineering Center
Natick Rasearch, Development & Engineering Center
Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory
Ballistic Research Laboratory
Vulnerability Assessment Laboratory
Directos,

Institute for Water Resources
Hydrologic Engineering Centar
Azmy Institute for Research in Management Information, Communication,

Computer Sciences (AIAMICS)
Bonet Laboratories
Aviation Research, Development & Engineering Center
Aeroflight dynamics Directorate
Propulsion Directorate
Aerostructures Directorate
Avionics Research & Development Activity
Canter for Cormand, Control & Communications Systems
Center for Llectronic Warfare/Reconnaissance, Surveillance 6

Target Acquisition
Center for Software Engineering
Center for Night Vision and Electro-Optics
Canter for signals Wartare

ACOM Rosearch, Development & Engineering Center
Army Research Office
Electronics Technology & Devices Laboratory
Harry Diamond Laboratories
Human Engineering Laboratory

Materials Technology Laboratory
Army ORTAS (W/Laboratory-level questionnaire)

SGRD-JA (LTC Sisson)

3

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NEONARDON TOR ARMY LARCON (MR. LARIM)

OPTICE OF WAYS TIC DIOLOGY

(DR. CULPPY, ONT-26)

AIR FORCE (HR. BLADOS, SAS/ACT) SUBJECT: GAO survey on Domestic Technology Transfer

la our nemorandum of January 19, 1990, to the GAO, we stated that some of the survey questions contained in the GAO questionnaire were inappropriate for a routing reporting reguisenent. However, the DoD position and also state that some of the questions may have derit !the data were being collected on & one-time program copie basis only. Discussions with Congressional stall Indicate a desire to obtain some of these data on a one-time basis.

Consistent with the memorandum to GAO, the survey questionnaire has been reexaaiaed to determine what questions could be answered on a one-time basis. The list of those questions is attached. The Congressional start numbers have requested that we expedite the responses to these remaining questions, and so I am requesting that you comply by February 12, 1990. please turale copies of your responses to GAO to this office (Attentioa: David Appier).

podle Bardienst

8. O. Berliacourt
Director, Research and
Laboratory Management

Attachment

Eruel

Mr. VALENTINE. Thank you all very much for the time you put in preparation for your time here with us.

Panel number 2 now, if Mr. Rak would come around and Dr. Giannini and Dr. Chen, accompanied by Mr. Adler.

Welcome, lady and gentlemen. Your prepared remarks will appear in the record as submitted to us and we request that youthat you summarize.

Mr. Rak.

STATEMENTS OF DANIEL S. RAK, DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRE

TARY OF THE AIR FORCE FOR ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT
AND POLICY, U.S. AIR FORCE, THE PENTAGON; DR. MARGARET
J. GIANNINI, DEPUTY ASSISTANT, CHIEF MEDICAL DIRECTOR
FOR REHABILITATION AND PROSTHETICS, VETERANS HEALTH
SERVICES AND RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS; AND DR. PHILIP S. CHEN, JR., ASSOCIATE
DIRECTOR FOR INTRAMURAL AFFAIRS, NATIONAL INSTITUTES
OF HEALTH, ACCOMPANIED BY REID · ADLER, DIRECTOR,
OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER, NATIONAL INSTITUTES
OF HEALTH
Mr. Rak. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, members of the committee.

On behalf of the United States Air Force, I appreciate the opportunity to appear and discuss with you the progress that is being made in the Air Force to comply with the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986.

This legislation, as you well know, seeks to optimize the private sector's utilization of the research results and research capabilities of the Federal laboratories. We perceive that there are two fundamental types of technology transfer contemplated by the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act, and the Federal Technology Transfer Act.

The first involves the transfer of information and includes providing advice, reports and technical consultation to State and local governments and private industry to the extent that that is not detrimental to the national security.

The second involves the transfer of property right through a more formal structured arrangement.

Air Force Regulation 80-27, domestic technology transfer, established Air Force policy and procedures for technology transfer by Air Force organizations, including the use of the cooperative research and development agreements, commercialization of Air Force technology, licensing of inventions and the distribution of resulting royalty income.

Successfully transferring technology information requires a twoway communication between the laboratory and the private sector as to what is available and what is needed. We have found that the best way for transferring technology is through the use of technology intermediaries. We interface with the private sector through the Federal Laboratory Consortium at the national level. At the State level, our laboratories participate in consortia or intermediary organizations created within the States in which they are located. New Mexico, California, Texas, Ohio, New York and Massachusetts have established such organizations.

Ohio Technology Transfer Organization, commonly called OTTO, typifies such organizations.

At the local level, we participate in technology consortia which focus on a specific area of technology. They provide a milieu in which technologists and scientists can gather, work together, and exchange ideas.

Although these State and regional or local systems can now be queried through representatives of the FLC, the Federal Laboratory Consortia, a next step will be look for more effective and efficient interfaces among these existing networks.

The second kind of technology transfer, which involves the transfer of a property right through a structured formal arrangement, may provide a more direct benefit to the Federal laboratory as well. Examples include the cooperative research and development agreements with private companies, as well as with universities, and direct transfer of technology by granting or licensing of patent rights.

In order to realize the fullest potential and benefits accruing from the technology transfer legislation, we in the Air Force did not limit such efforts to the laboratories alone, but extended the application of the regulation, to which I previously referred, to include all of the Air Force activities engaged in research, development, test and engineering efforts. This has already proven beneficial.

Two CRDAs have been instituted by nonlaboratory entities. Those examples are a CRDA was negotiated between Wilford Hall Medical Center in San Antonio and BioPolymers, Incorporated, to perform comprehensive feasibility studies on the use of biological adhesives in the repair of body tissue.

Another CRDA was negotiated between the USAF Medical Center at Keesler Air Force Base and the W. L. Gore & Associates, Incorporated, to perform feasibility studies on the use of expanded PTFE vascular graft material for ureteral replacement, which is obviously a very substantial-has a very substantial applicability to the treatment of battlefield injuries.

We have developed a model cooperative research and development agreement and have appended it to the regulation. It is useful as a guideline for the development and execution of other CRDAs by the laboratories and our other activities. We've also developed and published a technology transfer handbook. This handbook describes the Federal legislation and its mandated programs and activities to promote the transfer of technology, the products and processes, skills and knowledge resulting from technology.

This handbook also includes additional information on CRDAs, licenses and patents, and the role of the National Institute for Standards and Technology, as well as the role of the Federal Laboratory Consortium.

Let me highlight some specific aspects of Air Force implementation of the legislation. In addition to the regulations and the handbook that we have established, we've also established a domestic technology transfer

element within my office, the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition. Offices of Research and Technology Application or, as we call them, ORTAs, have been established at all Air Force laboratories. The ORTA is the informa

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