The Decline and Fall of Medieval Sicily: Politics, Religion, and Economy in the Reign of Frederick III, 1296-1337

Voorkant
Cambridge University Press, 22 aug. 2002 - 376 pagina's
This 1995 book is a detailed study of Sicilian life in the reign of Frederick III (1296-1337), a period which saw Sicily reduced from a bustling and prosperous Mediterranean emporium to a poor backwater torn apart by violence. The relative economic and social backwardness of Sicily within modern Italy has attracted considerable scholarly attention. Attempts to explain its ingrained poverty and civil strife usually blame either the legacy of two thousand years of colonisation by rapacious foreigners or the inherent weaknesses in the island itself and its people. More recently a model of 'economic dualism' has pointed to basic structural flaws in the economic relations that were established between the island and its continental trading partners from the twelfth century onwards. This book, by focusing on Frederick III's crucial reign, argues that there were many more things 'wrong' with Sicilian life than just the shape of its overseas trade relations.
 

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Inhoudsopgave

war without and within
29
the urbandemesnal world
85
the ruralbaronial world
156
piety and its problems
186
slaves pirates and women
247
Conclusion
303
Juriste and xurterii of Palermo
310
Feudal dues
316
Bibliography
327
Index
348
Copyright

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Populaire passages

Pagina 340 - Gli archivi e le biblioteche di Spagna in rapporto alla storia d'Italia in generale e di Sicilia in particolare.

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