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ground ?

As Cassius' legions are by Antony.

Tit. These tidings will well comfort Cassius.
Mes. Where did you leave him ?
Tit.

All disconsolate,
With Pindarus his bondman, on this hill.
Mes. Is not that he, that lies

upon

the
Tit. He lies not like the living. O my heart !
Mes. Is not that he ?
Tit.

No, this was he, Messala;
But Cassius is no more. O setting sun !
As in thy red rays thou dost sink to night,
So in his red blood Cassius' day is set :
The sun of Rome is set! Our day is gone;
Clouds, dews, and dangers come : our deeds are

done! Mistrust of my success hath done this deed. Mes. Mistrust of good success hath done this

deed. O hateful error, melancholy's child ! Why dost thou show to the apt thoughts of men The things that are not? O error, soon conceived, Thou never comest unto a happy birth, But kill'st the mother that engender'd thee.

Tit. What, Pindarus! Where art thou, Pindarus :

Mes. Seek him, Titinius; whilst I go to meet
The noble Brutus, thrusting this report
Into his ears ; I may say, thrusting it;
For piercing steel, and darts envenomed,
Shall be as welcome to the ears of Brutus,
As tidings of this sight.
Tit.

Hie you, Messala,

And I will seek for Pindarus the while.

[Exit Messala.
Why didst thou send me forth, brave Cassius?
Did I not meet thy friends ? and did not they
Put on my brows this wreath of victory,
And bid me give it thee? Didst thou not hear their

shoats ?
Alas, thou hast misconstrued every thing.
But hold thee, take this garland on thy brow;
Thy Brutus bid me give it thee, and I
Will do his bidding. Brutus, come apace,
And see how I regarded Caius Cassius.
By your leave, gods :—this is a Roman's part:
Come, Cassius' sword, and find Titinius' heart.

[dies.

Alarum. Re-enter MESSALA, with BRUTUS, YOUNG

CATO, STRATO, VOLUMNIUS, and LUCILIUS.
Bru. Where, where, Messala, doth his body lie?
Mes. Lo, yonder; and Titinius mourning it.
Bru. Titinius' face is upward.
Cato.

He is slain.
Bru. O Julius Cæsar, thou art mighty yet!
Thy spirit walks abroad, and turns our swords
In our own proper entrails.

[low alarums. Cato.

Brave Titinius!
Look, whe'r he have not crown'd dead Cassius !

Bru. Are yet two Romans living such as these?
The last of all the Romans, fare thee well !
It is impossible, that ever Rome

owe

more

Should breed thy fellow.-Friends, I

tears
To this dead man, than you shall see me pay.--
I shall find time, Cassius, I shall find time:
Come, therefore, and to Thassos send his body;
His funerals shall not be in our camp,
Lest it discomfort us.-Lucilius, come ;-
And come, young Cato; let us to the field.
Labeo, and Flavius, set our battles on :-
'Tis three o'clock; and, Romans, yet ere night
We shall try fortune in a second fight.

[Exeunt.

SCENE IV.

Another part of the field. Alarum. Enter, fighting, SOLDIERS of both armies ;

then BRUTUS, CATO, LUCILIUS, and others. Bru. Yet, countrymen, O, yet hold up your

heads ! Cato. What bastard doth not? Who will go with

me ?

I will proclaim my name about the field :-
I am the son of Marcus Cato, ho !
A foe to tyrants, and my country's friend :
I am the son of Marcus Cato, ho !

[charges the enemy. Bru. And I am Brutus, Marcus Brutus, I; Brutus, my country's friend : know me for Brutus. [Exit, charging the enemy.

Caio is overpowered, and falls.

2 B

:

SHAK.

XI.

Lucil. O young and noble Cato, art thou down? Wny, now thou diest as bravely as Titinius; And mayst be honor'd being Cato's son.1

1 Sol. Yield, or thou diest. Lucil.

Only I yield to die : There is so much, that thou wilt kill me straight;

[offering money. Kill Brutus, and be honor'd in his death.

i Sol. We must not.—A noble prisoner ! 2 Sol. Room, ho! Tell Antony, Brutus is ta'en. 1 Sol. I'll tell the news. Here comes the ge

neral :

Enter ANTONY.

Brutus is ta’en, Brutus is ta’en, my lord.

Ant. Where is he?

Lucil. Safe, Antony ; Brutus is safe enough:
I dare assure thee, that no enemy
Shall ever take alive the noble Brutus.
The gods defend him from so great a shame!
When you do find him, or alive or dead,
He will be found like Brutus, like himself.
Ant. This is not Brutus, friend; but, I assure

you,
A prize no less in worth : keep this man safe ;
Give him all kindness: I had rather have
Such men my friends than enemies. Go on,
And see whe'r Brutus be alive or dead;

Ti, e. worthy of him

And bring us word, unto Octavius' tent,
How every thing is chanced.

[Exeunt.

SCENE ..

Another part of the field.

Enter BRUTUS, DARDANIUS, CLITUS,

STRATO, and

VOLUMNIUS.

Bru. Come, poor remains of friends, rest on this

rock. Cli. Statilius show'd the torch-light; but, my

lord, He came not back: he is or ta'en or slain.

Bru. Sit thee down, Clitus: slaying is the word ; It is a deed in fashion. Hark thee, Clitus !

[whispering. Cli. What, I, my lord ? No, not for all the world. Bru. Peace then; no words. Cli.

I'll rather kill myself. Bru. Hark thee, Dardanius ! [whispers him. Dar.

Shall I do such a deed? Cli. O Dardanius! Dar. O Clitus ! Cli. What ill request did Brutus make to thee? Dar. To kill him, Clitus : look, he meditates.

Cli. Now is that noble vessel full of grief,
That it runs over even at his eyes.

Bru. Come hither, good Volumnius! list a word.
Vol. What says my lord ?
Bru.

Why, this, Volumnius :

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