Unfinished Business: South Africa, Apartheid, and Truth

Voorkant
Verso, 2003 - 385 pagina's
2 Recensies

Many people, both in South Africa and abroad, hoped that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission established in 1996 would uncover the hidden history of South Africa's apartheid past. It is a widely propagated myth that it did so. In fact, most of the thirty-three-year mandate of the Commission was ignored. Behind a facade of time constraints and managerial short comings, some intended investigations never proceeded, others were bungled. Most importantly, no serious examination was made of the system that gave rise to some of the most horrific, racist social engineering of modern times.

Unfinished Business pulls back the curtain on the 'political miracle' of the new South Africa to reveal some of the real stories in its past: how the Afrikaner Broederbond operated, the murderous activities of the South African security forces in Transkei, the citation of De Klerk as a defendant in a civil action for murder at exactly the moment he was traveling to Oslo to collect a Nobel peace prize, and many others.

Seeking to probe where the Commission failed or feared to tread, this books asks how long South Africa's miracle might be expected to last.

 

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Inhoudsopgave

A crime against humanity
7
End of the apartheid road
127
The Cala connection
142
The trial of the Puflsa Five
157
The killing of Bathandwa Ndondo
168
The forgotten people
179
Hit squad horrors
192
From culdesac to compromise
213
The talking begins
250
Serious talking begins
272
The genesis of the TRC
285
A tale of three survivors
299
The poisonous past reaches into the TRC
316
Vindication and afterthoughts
338
Notes on sources
353
Copyright

The nature of the beast
228

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Over de auteur (2003)

Terry Bell is a Cape Town-based freelance writer, columnist and editor who was banned and in exile from South Africa for twenty-seven years.

Dumisa Buhle Ntsebeza now practices as an advocate in Cape Town and is a Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law and History at the University of Connecticut.

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