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of sentiments and statements of facts for copy lines, 165. Mode of training the

young in the art of composition, 166-168.-SECTION III: Drawing-Mode of pro-

cedure in learning this art, 168. Fancy landscapes, &c. should be discarded;

drawing from the objects of nature and art, 169. Utility of this accomplishment,

170.-SECTION IV. Årithmetic.-Mode of conveying ideas of numbers; the rela

tive value of money; the measures of length and capacity, of time, and the divis

ions of the circle, (with figures,) 171-175. Sensible illustration of arithmetical

operations, (with cuts,) 176-179. Illustration of the value of fractions, 179. Mis-

cellaneous hints, 180. SECTION V. Grammar.-Absurdities in relation to this sub-

ject; Lord Kaime's opinion on our mode of teaching grammar, 182. Simple mode

of communicating the elements of grammar, 184-186. Origin of language, sug-

gests the proper method of teaching it, 187. Fundamental rules of syntax; com-

plexity of some of our "English Grammars," 188-190. General remarks, 190.

SECTION VI. Geography.-Utility of this science, 191. Deficiencies in the mode

of teaching it, 192. Mode of proving the globular form of the earth, illustrated

with figures, 192-195 Mode of conveying an impressive idea of its magnitude,

195. Quantity of solid matter it contains; how many mountains, such as Etna,

would be required to form a mass equal to the earth, 196. Diversified scenery on

the earth's surface, quantity of water in the rivers and seas, &c. 198. Projections

and delineations requisite for illustrating Geography, 199. Maps exhibiting the

ranges of mountains; the proportional length and breadth of rivers; comparative

size of countries, lakes, and seas; Isothermal charts; charts of geographical Zoology;

chart of moral and religious geography, &c.; views of cities, grottos, &c.; slate

globes; delineations of the comparative heights of mountains; wax models of par-

ticular countries, &c. 200-203. Mode of describing countries, 203. Geographical

class-books, what they should contain, 204. Directions for commencing this study,

205. Characteristics of certain Geographical school-books lately published in

America, 205. SECTION VII. Geology. Its practical utility, 206. Classification

of the rocks and strata of the globe, illustrated with a plate, 207. Specimens for

illustrating geological facts; books on Geology, 208-SECTION VIII. Astronomy.→

Object and utility of this science, 210. Mode of communicating to the young a

knowledge of celestial phenomena, 210. Observations on the motion of the sun,

and the phases of the moon; the principal stars and constellations; apparent motion

of the celestial vault; apparent annual motion of the sun; measures of the celes-

tial sphere, 211-215. Apparent motion of the planets; experiment which solves

the apparent irregularities, 215. Proofs of the Earth's diurnal rotation, 217; of its

annual revolution, 218. Additional proof exhibited by the Equatorial telescope

and orrery, 219. Mode of explaining the variety of seasons, 220. Manner of ex-

hibiting the phenomena of the planets, and the magnifying powers best adapted to

this purpose, 221. Circumstances to be attended to in exhibiting the moon through

a telescope, 222. Mode of exhibiting the solar spots, 223. Imperfect conceptions

conveyed by orreries and planetariums, 223. Manner of representing the propor-

tional magnitudes and distances of the planets, 224. Mode of explaining a parallax,

illustrated by figures, 226. Moral lessons deducible from this science, 227. Books

on Astronomy; Burrett's "Geography of the Heavens," &c. 228.

SECTION IX. Experimental Philosophy and Chemistry.-Departments of Experi-

mental Philosophy, 228. Mechanical powers; illustrations of the lever, &c. 229.

Experiments illustrative of Hydrostatical principles, (with figures,) 230-232. Sim-

ple experiments illustrative of Pneumatical subjects; pressure, elasticity, and com-

pressibility of air; principle of the diving-bell; syphons; effects of the expansion

of air, &c. (with figures,) 232-238. Methods of cutting glass tubes and bending

them for syphons, 238. Optical experiments, for explaining the principles of tele-

scopes and microscopes, 239. Description of a diagonal eye-piece, 241. Camera

obscura, on a large scale, 241. Phantasmagoria; solar microscope: manner of pro-

curing animalcula, 242. How a compound microscope may be formed from a com-

mon telescopic eye-piece, 243. Experiments with concave mirrors, 243; illusions

produced by them, 245. General remarks on philosophical apparatus, 246. Che-

mical subjects and apparatus; Books on Natural Philosophy and Chemistry, 246-

247.-SECTION X. Mathematics.-General remarks on the plan and order in which

a knowledge of this subject should be communicated to young persons, 247-250.-

SECTION XI. Physiology.-Inconsistency of omitting this department in a general

course of education, 250. Fvils which arise from ignorance of this subject, 251.—

Distortions of the human frame caused by absurd practices, illustrated by cuts, 252.

Means by which a general knowledge of the human system might be communica-

ted, 253.-Figure exhibiting the thorax and abdomen, 254.-Evidences of design in

the human fabric, 255.-Practical purposes to which a knowledge of Physiology

might be applied, 255.-SECTION XII. Logic, or the Art of Reasoning. Utility of

this subject, 256.-Outline of a comprehensive system of Logic, 257.-Popular Lo-

gic-examples of reasoning, with remarks, 258-262-Subjects for exercising the

reasoning powers, 262. Anecdotes of Gassendi, when a boy, and his mode of rea-

soning with his companions, with an engraving, 263.-Analysis of Gassendi's rea-

soning, 263.-Reasoning to prove that "air exists"-that "all should enjoy a moral

and intellectual education"-that "men should love one another," 265.-Sources

of Error illustrated, 267.-Sophisms illustrated, 269.-Particular species of false

reasoning, 270.-Importance of an early exercise of the rational faculty-evils

which have arisen from false reasoning, 271.-Diabolical reasoning-reasoning by

physical force-by torture-by fines and imprisonments-reasoning of persecutors,

of mobs, &c. Powerful influence of Gold in producing conviction, 273-SECTION

XIII. Natural Theology-An appropriate study for the young, 273. Summary of

subjects and facts connected with this study, 274. Books on Natural Theology,

275. Other departments of knowledge briefly noticed, Natural History, Botany, Po-

litical economy, Vocal music, Domestic economy, 276-277. Bodily exercises-

amusements and excursions, 278. Female education-illustrious females-energy

of the female mind, and its influence in society, 279.-Prevailing misconceptions,

281. Remarks on a hackneyed sentiment of Mr. Pope, 281.-Reasons for univer-

sal instruction, 283.

On the QUALIFICATIONS of Teachers, and SEMINARIES for their instruc-

tion, 311.

Deficiency in the qualifications of Teachers, 311-honourable nature of the office

Number of schools requisite to be established in Scotland and England, 319—

321-Expense of establishing them, 321. Importance of such institutions, and the

necessity for philanthropic exertions, 322. Liberality under the Jewish economy,

323. Enormous sums expended in war, 324. Pension list, 325. Contested elec

tions, 326. Savings which might be made in personal expenditure, 327. Sums

spent on spirituous liquors, 328. No want of resources-appeal to Christians, 328.

Contributions of the Jews, and predictions in relation to the Christian Church, 329.

Means requisite for exciting attention to this subject, 330. Limited views of edu-

cation taken by statesmen, 331. Voluntary and compulsory education, 332.

CHAPTER XII.

On the UTILITY of establishing seminaries for universal education, 333.

I. They would tend to the prevention of Crime. Number of thieves in London-

trials at the Old Bailey-erroneous views of legislation-inefficiency of severe pun-

ishments-juvenile delinquency-deficiency of Education in England and Scot-

land, 333-338. Beneficial results of education-Schools, publications, &c. in Bos-

ton and New-York, 339341. Expense of punishing crime, 342. II. Universal

education would elevate the general character of man, 343. Contrast between

the majority of mankind, and celestial intelligences, 344. Native dignity of man,

345 security of property dependent on education, 345. III. Universal educa

tion introductory to the Millennium, 346. Manner in which this era will be intro-

duced, 347-when it will commence, 348. Exertions preceding the Millennium,

349. Appeal to Christians, 350. Christian generosity and heroism, 351. Story of

St. Pierre, 352-Contributions for the tabernacle and temple, 352. The Pilgrims

of New England, 353.

CHAPTER XV

Mechanics' Institutions, 367.

The author's communications on this subject, in 1814, 368. Condensed view of
them, 368. Admission of members, 369. Subjects of discussion, and mode of
conducting it, 369-371. Funds of the Society, and their appl cation, 372. Publi.

course of education, 250. Evils which arise from ignorance of this subject, 251.-

Distortions of the human frame caused by absurd practices, illustrated by cuts, 25

Means by which a general knowledge of the human system might be communi

ted, 253.-Figure exhibiting the thorax and abdomen, 254.-Evidences of desig

the human fabric, 255.-Practical purposes to which a knowledge of Physic

might be applied, 255.-SECTION XII. Logic, or the Art of Reasoning. Utili

this subject, 256.-Outline of a comprehensive system of Logic, 257.-Popul

gic-examples of reasoning, with remarks, 258-262-Subjects for exercisi

reasoning powers, 262. Anecdotes of Gassendi, when a boy, and his mode

soning with his companions, with an engraving, 263.-Analysis of Gasser

soning, 263.-Reasoning to prove that "air exists"-that "all should enjo

and intellectual education"-that "men should love one another," 267

of Error illustrated, 267.-Sophisms illustrated, 269-Particular spec

reasoning, 270.-Importance of an early exercise of the rational f

which have arisen from false reasoning, 271.-Diabolical reasoning-

physical force-by torture-by fines and imprisonments-reasoning

of mobs, &c. Powerful influence of Gold in producing conviction

XIII. Natural Theology-An appropriate study for the young, 27

subjects and facts connected with this study, 274. Books on N

275. Other departments of knowledge briefly noticed, Natural H

litical economy, Vocal music, Domestic economy, 276-277.

amusements and excursions, 278. Female education-illustri

of the female mind, and its influence in society, 279.-Preva

281. Remarks on a hackneyed sentiment of Mr. Pope, 281

sal instruction, 283.

CHAPTER VI

Sabbath Sch

Defects which adhere to the present syst
cations of Sabbath School Teachers, and ti
acquainted, 299-Necessity of their being
ments of knowledge they should study-
lical Criticism, &c. 302-306. General r
be avoided, &c. 306. Books on this subj

Necessity of such institutions, 308

sons should be directed, 309. Pre-r

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