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POETICAL WORKS

OF

JOHN DRYDEN.

IN THREEVOLUMES.

WITH THE LIFE OF THE AUTHOR.

Hear how Timotheus'vary'd lays surprise,
And bid alternate passions fall and rise.---
The power of music all our hearts allow,
And what Timotheus was is DRYDEN now, POPE.

Behold where DRYDE V's jess presumptuous car
Wide o'er the fields of glosy bear
Two coursers of ethereal race.
With necks in thunder cloată'd, any long-resounding pace,
Hark, his hands the lyre explore!
Bright-ey'd Fancy hov'ring o'er,
Scatters from her pictur'd urn
Thoughts that breathe, and words that bura.
But ah! 'tis heard no more.

GRAY

VOL. III.

EDINBURG:

AT THE Apollo Press, BY THE MARTINS,

Anno 1778.

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But see where artful DRYDEN next appears,
Grown old in rhyme, but charming even in years!
• Great DRYDEN next! whose tuneful Muse affords

The sweetest numbers and the fittest words,
Whether in comic sounds or tragic airs
She forms her voice, she moves our smiles or tears.
If satire or heroic strains she writes,
Her hero pleases, and her catire bites.
From her no harsh unartful dumbers fall;
She wears all dresses, and she charms in all. ADDISON.

EDINBURG:
AT THE Apollo Press, BY THE MARTINS

Anno 1778.

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4-29-32
AN ESSAY UPON SATIRE.

BY MR. DRYDEN AND THE E. OF MULGRAVE,

TO

How dull and how insensible a beast
Is man, who yet would lord it o'er the rest ?
Philosophers and poets vainly strove,
In ev'ry age, the lumpish mass to move ;

But those were pedants, when compar'd with these, son Who know not only to instruct, but please. 6 v Poets alone found the delightful way

Mysterious morals gently to convey
In charming numbers ; so that as men grew
Pleas'd with their poems, they grew wiser too.
Satire has always shone among the rest,
And is the boldest way, if not the best,
To tell men freely of their foulest faults,
To laugh at their vain deeds, and vainer thoughts.
lo satire, too, the wise took diff'rent ways, 15
To each deserving its peculiar praise.
Some did all folly with just sharpness blame,
Whilst others laugh'd and scorp'd 'em into shame.
Buc of these two the last succeeded best,
As men aim rightest when they shoot in jest.
Yet, if we may presume to blame our guides,
And censure those who censure all besides,
In other things they justly are preferr'd;
In this alone, methinks, the Ancients err'd;
Volume III,

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