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there a reason why the landlord should not rents relatively to the price of labour, dininish his rents, and is not the interest of which proved clearly that more things the consumer to be considered as well as were to be taken into consideration than that of the grower? The question was tried the landholders imagined, and several of in a part of Wiltshire in an extraordinary great property declaring themselves ad. manner, when a meeting was holden to pe. verse to the petition, the meeting broke up tition the legislature on the subject, and to the entire confusion of those who had the landholders who called it, very injudi. called it. In fact, the real interest of no ciously introduced into their petition the jo- one class in the community is to be sacri. terest of the tradesman, the manufacturer ficed to the emolument of another. The and the labourer, which very early in the growers of corn have possessed great addebate appeared to be untenable ground, vantages, but it does not follow that they and the interests of the growers was only are to remain for ever the same. They must retained. But even with this emendation expect in common with the others good and the landholders' point was not carried, for bad years, and it will be for the interest of one, who seemed to have entered more the proprietors of land to let the whole deeply into the question than the others, community participate in the advantages to put some close questions on the increase of be expected from peace.

NEW THEOLOGICAL PUBLICATIONS.

ΑΙΡΕΣΕΩΝ ΑΝΑΣΤΑΣΙΣ : intended as a Preservative from Scepticism, or, a new way of deciding Old Controver. Indifference and Credulity. By the Rev. sies. By Basanistes, 3rd Edition. Enlarg- T. Finch, Minister of Salem Chapel, Lynn. ed. 8vo. 7s.

8vo. A Plain View of the Unitarian Christian The Scripture Account of the Attributes Doctrine, in a Series of Essays on the One and Worship of God, and of the Character God, the Father, and the Mediator between and Offices of Jesus Christ. By Hopton God and Men, the Man Christ Jesus. By Haynes, with a Biographical Sketch of the Richard Wright, Unitarian Missionary. Author, 4th edition 12mo. 5s. 12mo. 8s.

A Sermon, on the Use of Reason in An Examination of the supposed Scrip- Religion, Preached at George's Meeting, ture Proof of the Doctrines of the Trinity, Exeter, Dec. 18th 1814. By James and of the Deity of Jesus Christ: With an Manning, 8vo. Is. Answer to the principal Objections of Tri. A Letter to the Bishop of St. David's, nitarians to the Unitarian Doctrine and its on some extraordinary Passages in a charge Professors. By the same. 12mo. 2s. [This delivered to the Clergy of his Diocese, Pamphlet is a separate publication of the in Sept. 1813. By A Lay Seceder. Appendir to the Plain View.)

8vo. Is. A Vindication of the General Baptists, The Progress of Intellectual, Moral and from some Aspersions cast upon them in Religions Improvement --a Discourse bethe Letters published by the Rev. Joseph fore the Unitarian Society, at Essex Street Ivimey, respecting the Catholic Claims : Chapel, March 31. 1814 : with an ApAn Address at the General Baptist Meeting- pendix containing a Summary Review of House, Portsmouth. By A Member (Not the Bishop of St. David's Memorial,

By a Minister). 12mo.

Thomas Belsham. 8vo. 58. A Practical Illustration of the Christian Jesus of Nazareth, a Man approved of System, shewing its Reasonableness and God. A Discourse before the Southern Moral Excellence ; chiefly designed for Unitarian Society. By James Gilchrist, the Consideration of Young People, and 12mo.

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ERRATA AND ADDENDA IN VOL. IX. P.771. col. ii. line 2, for“ Petminster” read Pitminster.

776, Nole. At the end, add---Geddes was afterwards so dissatisfied with the tern skip-offering that he wished another to be substituted for it. Memoirs of him by Good. 344, 355 (Note).

778. col. i. line 20, from the top, after the word “ modest" place a note of ad. miration.

780. col. ii. line 2, from the top, for “ Zenophon" read Xenophon. 784. col. ii. line 16, from the bottom, for “ preeision” read precision.

787. col. i. line 21, from the top, place the inverted compas before the words, the Christian Hebrews, &c.

1

which are confined to theology and Before seventeen, whilst yet in his theological criticism. Of these the apprenticeship, he signed articles as principal, besides those mentioned, are second mate of the vessel, in which entitled, The Catechist, or an In- a short time before he entered as caquiry concerning the only True God; bin boy. When in this situation in an Historical View of the State of the the West Indies, a circumstance ocUnitarian Doctrine and Worship curred, which is worthy of preserva. Vindiciæ Priestleianæ ; an Address tion. He was despatched from the to the Students of Oxford and Cam- ship with a boat's crew, on some erbridge ; an Examination of Mr. Ro- rand to the shore, the vessel then ly. binson's Plea for the Divinity of Christ; ing a few miles from the shore; when Conversations on Christian Idolatry; about three miles from Jamaica, the and Conversations on the Divine Go- boat, from some unknown cause, upverament, shewing that every thing set, and five or six individuals were is from God, and for good to all. Mr. left to struggle for life, depending only Lindsey died Nov. 3, 1808, aged 86. on their bodily strength and skill for

Smee his death there have been pub- their preservation. The boat in a lished Sermons, with appropriate Pray- short time presented itself keel upers annexed, in two volumes, and the wards, upon which they all speedily Rev. Mr. Belsham, the present mi- mounted, but no sooner had they mister of Essex Street Chapel, has seated themselves, and congratulated published (in 1812) Memoirs of the each other on their escape, than the late Rev. Mr. Lindsey, addressed to boat slipped from under them, and Richard Reynolds, Esq. of Paxton, they were again left to struggle. Nr. Lindsey's earliest pupil, and In the boat, among others, was a through life his intimate and chosen negro, whose name was Quamina, friend.

between this individual and my fa

ther, a friendship had for some time Biographical Sketch of Edward Rush- subsisted, for my father taught Qua

ton, written by his Son. mina to read. When the boat disap(From the Belfast Monthly Magazine, for peared, my father beheld at some disDec. 1814.* ]

tance, a small cask, which he kuew DWARD RUSHTON

contained fresh water; for this cask

EBOARDthe Rising of an ember, he made, but before he could reach

1756, in John Street, Liverpool. His it, it was seized by the Negro, who, education, which he received at a on sering my father almost exhausted free school, terminated with his ninth thrust the cask towards him, turned year. At ten he read Anson's voyage, away bis head, bidding him good resolved to be a sailor, was bound as bye, and never more was seen. This an apprentice to Watt and Gregson, cask saved my father's life. I can reand before he entered his eleventh member well his telling me this story year, he was a sea boy in the West with tears in his eyes

It made an Indies. He performed the various du- impression on my mind, which no ties of his station with skill and credit; time can ever efface. this was evinced by the following fact: As second mate of the vessel he at this time, i. e. when he reached continued until the term of his apprenhis sixteenth year, he received the ticeship was expired. At this period, thanks of the captain and crew of the offer of a superior situation, and the vessel, for his sea-man like con- of course, of greater emolument, indoct, having seized the helm, and ex- duced him to proceed to the coast of tricated the ship, when the captain Africa, on a slaving voyage. His and crew were wandering about in sentiments of this disgraceful traffic, despair.

when he beheld its horrors, though in a subordinate situation, with that

boldness and integrity which characaffectionate deference to the opinions of

terized his every action, others, and in this sense, loving and ho

expressed nouring all men.

in strong and pointed language ; he • We lament to add that the above is went so far in this respect, that it was the closing Number of this valuable work. thought necessary to threaten him Wby will Irishmen complain of English with irons, if he did not desist. men, when they themselves will not pa- On this fatal voyage, whilst at Do. troaize Ireland ?

minica, he was attacked by a violent inflammation of the eyes, which in With an increasing family, and a three weeks left him with the left eye very small fortune, for a while my fatotally destroyed, and the right en-ther hesitated before he fixed on any tirely covered by an opacity of the particular line of conduct. He thought cornea. Thus in his nineteenth year, of several plans, but none seemed was he deprived of one of the greatest more agreeable to his feelings, than blessings of nature; thus, to use his the business of a bookseller; his own language, “ doomed to penury habits and his pursuits combined to severe, thus to the world's hard huf- render it more eligible than any other fets left."

which presented itself to his thoughts. In 1776, attended by my grandfa- With thirty guineas, five children, ther, he visited London, and amongst and a wife, to whose exertions we other eminent men, he consulted the owe more than words can express, celebrated Baron Wentzell, oculist to my father commenced bookselling. the king, who declared he could not My mother, my excelleut mother, labe of the least service.

boured incessantly, and with frugality In this hopeless situation, my poor and attention, the business succeeded, father returned to Liverpool, and re- and my father felt himself more easy. sided with my grandfather. With him At this time politics ran very high he continued for some short period, in Liverpool, my father had published until by the violent temper of my several of his pieces, all in favour of grandfather's second wife, he was the rights of man. He became a noted compelled to leave the house, and to character, was marked, and by some maintain himself on four shillings per illiberal villain shot at; the lead passweek. For seven years he existed ed very close to his eyebrow, but did on this miserable, and, considering not do him the smallest injury. the circumstances of my grandfather, His butterfly friends who had conthis shameful allowance; for an old stantly visited while all was serene, aunt gave him lodgings. Whilst sub- now began tu desert him; they were sisting on this sum, he managed to pay afraid of being seen near the house, a boy two-pence or three-pence a merely because my father had boldly week, for reading to him an hour or stepped forward in the cause of liberty two in the evenings. I have now in and of truth. Let it not be forgotten, my possession, gold brooch, to that the foremost of these was the comewhich I have heard him declare, he dian, before mentioned, a man who has often been indebted for a dinner; owes his wealth to my father's advice, nor was this brooch confined to him- who persuaded bim to try the stage. self, a noted comedian of the present Such are the narrow prejudices, and day, whose avarice has long since got paltry feelings, with which a man has the better of his principle, has bor- to struggle, whose determination it is rowed and pledged this very brooch to speak and act as his heart shall dicfor the self-same purpose. From this tate. But great was the satisfaction state my father was removed to one my father experienced from the steady much more comfortable. My grand- attachment, the unremitting attention father placed one of his daughters and of a few tried and true friends, who my father in a tavern, where he lived with him had hailed the light wherefor some years, and soon after my ever it appeared, and exulted in the aunt's marriage, his also took place, triumphs of liberty, in whatever land his age being then twenty-nine. My they were achieved. Whilst in busifather finding, however, his pecuniary ness as a bookseller, the purses of the circumstances rather diminishing than late William Rathbone, and of Wilincreasing, left the public house. liam Roscoe, were offered to him; he

Henow entered into an engagement was invited to take what sum he might as an editor of a newspaper, called the want; he refused them both; and be Herald, which he for some time pur- has often told me, his feelings have sued with much pleasure, and little been those of satisfaction, when he profit, until finding it impossible to reflected on this. refusal. He was in express himself in that independent poverty, nay, the very moment he and liberal manner which his reason was struggling hard to gain a scanty and his conscience dictated, he threw pittance, yet he maintained his indeup his situation, and began the world pendence, and triumphed. once more.

His life for some years was but little

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which are confined to theology and Before seventeen, whilst yet in his theological criticism. Of these the apprenticeship, he signed articles as principal, besides those mentioned, are second mate of the vessel, in which entitled, The Catechist, or an In- a short time before he entered as caquiry concerning the only True God; bin boy. When in this situation in an Historical View of the State of the the West Indies, a circumstance ocCnitarian Doctrine and Worship curred, which is worthy of preservaVindiciæ Priestleianæ ; an Address tion. He was despatched from the to the Students of Oxford and Cam- ship with a boat's crew, on some erbridge ; an Examination of Mr. Ro- rand to the shore, the vessel then ly. bioson's Plea for the Divinity of Christ; ing a few miles from the shore; when Conversations on Christian Idolatry; about three miles from Jamaica, the and Conversations on the Divine Go- boat, from some unknown cause, upvernment, shewing that every thing set, and five or six individuals were is from God, and for good to all. Mr. left to struggle for life, depending only Lindsey died Nov. 3, 1808, aged 86. on their bodily strength and skill for

Since his death there have been pub- their preservation. The boat in a lished Sermons, with appropriate Pray- short time presented itself keel upers annexed, in two volumes, and the wards, upon which they all speedily Rev. Mr. Belsham, the present mi- mounted, but no sooner had they nister of Essex Street Chapel, has seated themselves, and congratulated published in 1812) Memoirs of the each other on their escape, than the late Rev. Mr. Lindsey, addressed to boat slipped from under them, and Richard Reynolds, Esq. of Paxton, they were again left to struggle. Mr. Lindsey's earliest pupil, and In the boat, among others, was a through life his intimate and chosen negro, whose name was Quamina, friend.

between this individual and my fa

ther, a friendship had for some time Biographical Sketch of Edward Rush- subsisted, for my father taught Qua

ton, written by his Son. mina to read. When the boat disap[From the Belfast Monthly Magazine, for peared, my father beheld at some disDec. 1814.* ]

tance, a small cask, which he knew VDWARD RUSI TON was contained fresh water; for this cask

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1756, in John Street, Liverpool. His it, it was seized by the Negro, who, education, which he received at a on secing my father almost exhausted free school, terminated with his ninth thrust the cask towards him, turned Fear. At ten he read Anson's voyage, away his head, bidding him good resolved to be a sailor, was bound as bye, and never more was seen. This an apprentice to Watt and Gregson, cask saved my father's life. I can reand before he entered his eleventh member well his telling me this story year, he was a sea boy in the West with tears in his eyes It made an İndies. He performed the various du- impression on my mind, which no ties of his station with skill and credit; time can ever efface. this was evinced by the following fact:

As second mate of the vessel he at this time, i. e. when he reached continued until the term of his apprenhis sixteenth year, he received the ticeship was expired. At this period, thanks of the captain and crew of the offer of a superior situation, and the vessel, for his sea-man like con- of course, of greater emolument, induct, having seized the helm, and ex- duced him to proceed to the coast of tricated the ship, when the captain Africa, on a slaving voyage. His and crew were wandering about in sentiments of this disgraceful traffic, despair.

when he beheld its horrors, though

in a subordinate situation, with that affectionate deference to the opinions of terized his every action, he expressed

boldness and integrity which characothers, and in this sense, loving and honouring all men.

in strong and pointed language ; he * We lament to add that the above is went so far in this respect, that it was the closing Number of this valnable work. thought necessary to threaten him Why will Irishmen complain of English- with irons, if he did not desist. men, when they themselves will not pa

On this fatal voyage, whilst at Dotronize Ireland ?

minica, he was attacked by a violent Memoir of the late Rev. Herbert an assiduous and useful assistant to Jenkins.

the President of it, particularly in R. HERBERT JENKINS was communicating, as a gentleman who

, -,

a

where his father was minister of the portant information on the structure Independent Congregation. He re- of the English language, and on toceived the rudiments of classical learn- pics connected with it. Here a close ing under the Rev. John Wiche, the intimacy commenced between Mr. Baptist Minister in the same town:* Jenkins and Dr. Addington, which but his proficiency was greatly as- lasted as long as the latter lived. sisted by the attention and paius be- When he appeared in the public stowed on his improvement by his character of the preacher, he became father, whom he had the infelicity to first, a colleague with the venerable Jose early in life. But, stimulated by Mr. Hampton, at Banbury, Oxfordhis own thirst after knowledge, he shire, in 1792. From whence he reprepared himself, by assiduous appli- moved to Stourbridge, in Worcestercation and study, pursued under un- shire, July, 1796. He resigned his favourable circumstances, to support pastoral connexions there in 1808, the character of a private tutor to youth and settled at Hinckley. He had not in families of the higher rank. A vi- resided much more than two years in gorous and capacious mind, united that town when it pleased Providence with a quick and lively imagination, to visit him with a long and severe aided his acquisition of a large share illness. His life was in imminent danof information upon almost every sub. ger; and though his days were not ject; which was fully known to those immediately cut off, he never recovered only who dwelt under the same roof his former vigour and health; and with him. His system of instruction found it necessary to withdraw from was rendered very complete and va- the stated services of the pastoral ofluable, we have learnt, by an im- fice, at least in a large congregation, provement of almost every circum- and where his appearance in the pulstance and occurrence of the passing pit on both parts of the day was reday, upon which some useful infor- quired. That severe illness he bore mation might be grafted; and it was with pious resignation and Christian often remarked, that he had a pecu- fortitude ; though he devoutly acquiliar happiness in his method of con- esced in the will of heaven, he deeply veying his ideas to others. He spent felt the affliction of being obliged to some years, before he entered on relinquish the public functions of the theological studies, in the capacity of Christian ministry, even in part. a tutor in several families; particu- In the duties of his public characlarly in that of Sir George Staunton, ter he evidently took a high pleasure. whom he accompanied into Ireland; In the performance of them he was and by whom he was invited to at- ambitious to excel and to be thought tend his son in the embassy to China. to excel, and had, it may be regretThis alluring offer he declined, parti. ted, too lively a feeling of the recepcularly from an apprehension that an tion his services met with. A soliciacceptance of it might draw him off tude, as to the justness and propriety from his views and purposes of settling, of his elocution, originating probably as a dissenting minister. During this from the nature of his early studies, period of his life, as he had bestowed was thought by some to have given peculiar attention on the study of clo- too studied an appearance to his de.. cution, he was engaged to read lec- livery, so as to be unfavourable to the tures on that subject, ilt the new Col- effect of discourses well-suited, by lege in Hackney.

the subject, sentiments and spirit of Relinquishing these useful employ. them, to excite attention and impress ments, he commenced a student in the heart : so difficult is it for frail divinity, in the academy under the di- man, even in the pursuit of excellence, rection of the Rev. Dr. Addington, at to avoid faults: so difficult is it, where Mile End, near London. From his we aim to merit praise, to escape entrance into this seminary, he was blame. In estimating human attain

See a Meinoir of Mr. Wiche in the ments and human characters, much Protestant Dissenter's Magazine for 1797, allowance ought to be made for unVol. iv. p. 121.

known but very supposable impres

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