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individual of the human race, and the distressed lady, cannot be altogether apostacy of an angelic being. We excused,but candour will make fahoped ihat our translator would, in yourable allowances for the frailty of bis notes, have offered reasons for her sex and the severity of her trial.” putting this construction upon the Whose good opinion could this ininquiry. He has produced none: genious man (for such he was) hope and the comment, we believe, rests on to conciliate by so extraordinary s no other authority than his own. We piece of criticism? How unworthy are entirely at a loss to understand is it of the correctness of judgment why he should conceive of the word which, for the most part, pervades his man as being emphatic in these version!" verses. Was it not the natural and On chap. iii. 8, “Let the sorcerers proper term by which to speak of the of the day curse it!" Mr. G. writes hero of the poem? In Num. sxvii. thus : 18, God says unto Moses, “ Take “ A belief in divination or enchantment, thee Joshua, the son of Nun, a has, from some cause or other, been exhi. man," &c. Now, is this a marked bited, from a very early period of time, description? Does not the same mode over every quarter of the globe. To exa

mine into the nature of such causes, would of expression occur very frequently? The truth is, Mr. Good sat down to lead us too far from the object of our purhis labours with a fixed persuasion that various passages in the Bible indicate,

It is enough to observe at present that the Satan of the book of Job is that such a sort of supernatural power was, the prince of the fallen angels; an in the earlier ages of the world, committed opinion altogether gratuitous! He to different persons of very different chatherefore readily perceives, even in racters, and even religions." the words a man, a confirmation of In support of this most extraordi. bis hypothesis. In the process out nary assertion, our annotator refers to of which such interpretations arise Melchizedek and Balaam. But where there is nothiug uncommon: how- shall we find any proof or presumpever, the gloss on which we are tion, of the former having been “thus animadverting, is not a little singular. miraculously endowed ?" All which But, though the translator has in this can be learned from Gen. xiv. 19, is case unconsciously deceived himself, that “ this priest of the most high we trust that his crror will be seen God” blessed Abram. Jacob also and avoided by those of his readers “ blessed Pharaoh," Gen. xlvii. 10. with whom it is an object to study And is such an act of benediction inthe Scriptures on the principles of dependent evidence that Jacob had fair and solid criticisin.

miraculous endowments? Mr. G., There is a material difference be. however, subjoins that Melchizedek tween Ch. ii. 9, as it stands in the *“ prophesied concerning the prospeHebrew text, which most of the mo- rity” of Abram's family. Now from dern translators strictly follow, and what passage of scripture is such a as it appears in the Septuagint and fact to be deduced? We can discover some other ancient versions. Mr. G. none, and must therefore pronounce has, in his notes, translated the ad- this instance irrelevant to the author's dition: nor do we blame him for purpose. Nor is there even the apgiving it an English dress; though pearance of truth in the position that he seems as fully convinced as we are Balaam possessed supernatural qualiof its spuriousness. We shall take fications. That he pretended to some, this opportunity of remarking, that may be conceded. Dis claims and his some of the commentators on Job character are strongly reprobated in have been disposed to aggravate, and the sacred writingst. He was one of others, with as little reason, to soften, the jugglers of the cast; though, in a the offence of the patriarch's wife, in single instance, and for the purpose of the question, “ Dost thou hold fast defeating his impious views, the Suthine integrity?” Scott's comment preme Being inspired him with the upon it is truly curious, and alike gift of prophecy, Elymas (Acts xiii. violates taste and courtesy: “ The 8,) and the Jewish exorcists at Epherashness,” he observes, “ of this poor sus (Acts xix. 13), were of the same

profession with Balaam: and their As in Gen. xli. 33, 38, Josh. iii. 12, 1 Sam. xi, xiii. xvi. 16, &c. &c. ,

+ 2 Pet. ii. 15, Jude 11, Rev. ii, 14.

and an enduring substance. "They who say it occurs: and whenever it is emsuch things,' as the author of this epistle ployed negatively, it has the precise remarks, they who acknowledge human force of, and in its general rangt runs life to be a pilgrimage, and yet are per precisely parallel with, our own nor, suaded of the wisdom and goodness of and the Latin nec or neve: and hence God, • declare plainly that they seek a country.' Can it be supposed that we

is only an imperfect or half negative, were endued with such noble powers and requiring a preceding negative, as capacities, only to Autter about like the nor and nec require, to make the ne. insect race, and then to disappear for ever; gatiou complete.” He adds, that we were introduced into this grand “ Now I venture to lay it down, as a and beautiful theatre, merely to glance at philological canon, applicable to all lanthe works of God, and then to be blotted guages whatever, that the imperfect negaout from creation Shall we suppose that tive may be employed alone in every senGod has made all men in vain? Does tence compounded of two opposite prothe breath of the Almighty, which animates positions, when it becomes the means of our frame, vanish into air? Will light connecting the one with the other : such never arise on the long night of the grave ? propositions being in a state of reciprocal Do the wise and the worthy, the pious and negation, and the former, of course, supthe just, the great and the good, the er- plying the place of an antecedent negative cellent ones of the earth, withdraw into to the subsequent and imperfect connecting annihilation, and set in darkness to rise no particle.” more? If such were to be our state, would

Of this canon he gives some examnot man appear, of all creatures, the most unaccountable? Would not the world be ples from the English language, and a chaos without form and order, and one from the Latin; but we must human life a paradox beyond our power to confess ourselves greatly disappointed explain?" Pp. 284, 285.

that he has not produced a single inThe Volume closes with the Fu- the Hebrew tongue. Nor is it within

controvertible illustration of it from neral Sermon for Mr. Harrison, 'by Mr. John Holland, which breathes

our power to supply the deficiency.

We have in vain had recourse to an affectionate respect for the deceased and contains an interesting particle in question the sense of ne

Noldius, who assigns indeed to the comparison between him and his col. league, Dr. Barnes.

que,t yet immediately subjoins, post

negationem : and the truth is that in Art. II. Good's Translation of the

all his instances the foregoing clause Book of Job, &c. &c.

expresses a negation. It would afford (Concluded from page 118.]

us considerable pleasure if Mr. G. to

himself, or any of our readers, could

establish rule be a happy man indeed, if he does not commit some errors." This was the

it as universal. If the particle which remark of the learned Mr. Peters :*

is the subject of his criticism, have a and both the fact and the principle follows a direct and unequivocal ne;

negative signification only when it here implied, are sufficiently established by experience. We cannot

gation, the words “ may have sinned be astonished, therefore, at meeting

nor blessed God," must be pronounced with mistakes in the Notes of the glish than to that of Hebrew authors;

more agreeable to the usage of En. author, whose Translation of the poem and it will still remain to be proved before us, and whose Introductory that they are a legitimate translation I'reface to it, have come, of late, under our review.

of the original. He has favoured us, nevertheless, observes, that “the interrogation of

In his Dissertation (xv.) Mr. Good with many excellent observations upon his rendering of a clause of the thou fixed thy view upon my servant

the Almighty, Ch. i. 8, ii. 3, · Hast fifth verse of the first chapter; "may Job, a perfect and upright man!' is have signed, won blessed God.” “The intended as a severe and most aporiginal particle," he says, “ is either affirmative or negative, according to

propriate sarcasm upon the fallen. the nature of the proposition in which

spirit." It is a contrast, he thinks,

between the undeviating virtue of an Critical Dissertation, &c. (2nd ed.) + Concordantiæ Particul. &c. (1734,) 172.

pp. 294, &c.

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individual of the human race, and the distressed lady, cannot be altogether apostacy of an angelic being. We excused,—but candour will make fa. hoped i hat our translator would, in yourable allowances for the frailty of bis notes, have offered reasons for her sex and the severity of her trial.” putting this construction upon the Whose good opinion could this ininquiry. He has produced none: genious man (for such he was) hope and the comment, we believe, rests on to conciliate by so extraordinary s no other authority than his own. We piece of criticism? How unworthy are entirely at a loss to understand is it of the correctness of judgment why he should conceive of the word which, for the most part, pervades his man as being emphatic in these version!" verses. Was it not the natural and On chap. iii. 8, “ Let the sorcerers proper term by which to speak of the of the day curse it!" Mr. G. writes hero of the poem? In Num. xxvii. thus : 18, God says unto Moses, “ Take “ A belief in divination or enchantment, thee Joshua, the son of Nun, a has, from some cause or other, been exhiman,", &c. Now, is this, a marked bited, from a very early perind of time, description? Does not the same mode over every quarter of the globe. To exa

mine into the nature of such causes, would of expression occur very frequently ?* The truth is, Mr. Good sat down to suit. It is enough to observe at present

lead us too far from the object of our purhis labours with a fixed persuasion that various passages in the Bible indicate, that the Satan of the book of Job is that such a sort of supernatural power was, the prince of the fallen angels; an in the earlier ages of the world, committed opinion altogether gratuitous! He to different persons of very different chatherefore readily perceives, even in racters, and even religions." the words a man, a confirmation of In support of this most extraordi. his hypothesis. In the process out nary assertion, our annotator refers to of which such interpretations arise Melchizedek and Balaam. But where there is nothiug uncommon: how. shall we find any proof or presumpever, the gloss on which we are tion, of the former having been “ thus animadverting, is not a little singular. miraculously endowed ?" All which But, though the translator has in this can be learned from Gen. xiv. 19, is case unconsciously deceived himself, that “ this priest of the most high we trust that his crror will be seen God" blessed Abram. Jacob also and avoided by those of his readers“ blessed Pharaoh," Gen. xlvii. 10. with whom it is an object to study And is such an act of benediction inthe Scriptures on the principles of dependent evidence that Jacob had fair and solid criticism.

Mr. G., There is a material difference be. however, subjoins that Melchizedek tween Ch. ji. 9, as it stands in the " prophesied concerning the prospeHebrew text, which most of the mo- rity" of Abram's family. Now from dern translators strictly follow, and what passage of scripture is such a as it appears in the Septuagint and fact to be deduced? We can discover some other ancient versions. Mr. G. none, and must therefore pronounce has, in his notes, translated the ad- this instance irrelevant to the author's dition: nor do we blame him for purpose. Nor is there even the apgiving it an English dress; though pearance of truth in the position that he seems as fully convinced as we are Balaam possessed supernatural qualiof its spuriousness. We shall take fications. That he pretended to some, this opportunity of remarking, that may be conceded. "Bis claims and his some of the commentators on Job character are strongly reprobated in have been disposed to aggravate, and the sacred writingst. He was one of others, with as little reason, to soften, the jugglers of the east; though, in a the offence of the patriarch's wife, in single instance, and for the purpose of the question, “ Dost thou hold fast defeating his impious views, the Suthine integrity?” Scott's comment preme Being inspired him with the upon it is truly curious, and alike gift of prophecy. Elymas (Acts xiii. violates taste and courtesy: “ The 8,) and the Jewish exorcists at Epherashness," he observes, “ of this poor sus (Acts xix. 13), were of the same tain's vessel in that far-famed voyage, of the “ Critical Dissertation on the was celebrated, we know, for speed.* Book of Job,” interprets the verses in

miraculous endowments?

profession with Balaam: and their As in Gen, xli. 33, 38, Josh. iii. 12, 1 Sam, xi. xiij. xvi. 16, &c. &c.

† 2 Pet. 15, Jude 11, Rev. ii. 14.

We have no pleasure in detecting the same manner with Mr. G. He and exposing the mistakes of the thus paraphrases vers. 7–11:“ Afworthy annotator. Yet our readers ter a tree is cut down, we see, nevershould be informed that his imagina- theless, the old stock flourish again, tion often triumphs over his judg- and send forth new branches: and ment, and that he too easily beholds shall man then, when he once expires, Pagan as well as Rabbinical mytholo. be extinct for ever? Is there no hope gies in this ancient poem.

that he shall revive, and be raised Let us next attend to some of his again hereafter?” 187. remarks upon ch. xiv. 12, &c.

According to this paraphrase, Job " It has been a subject of dispute among

reasons from the renewal of vegetathe commentators, whether Job, in the tion in the spring, to the resurrection present place, refers to a definite terin in of the human body: expectation prewhich a resurrection will take place, or vails over doubt in the speaker's denies it by the strongest figure he could mind; and he institutes a comparison command.' Yet I think the latter part of rather than a contrast. We think, the sentence, in vers. 14, 15, is so strongly however, that King James's transin favour of the former opinion, that no man can refuse his assent to it, who gives

lators have accurately rendered the it the attention it is entitled to : nor do I particle at the beginning of the tenth well know how a full persuasion of such a

verse by a word denoting opposition : belief could be more definitely drawn up.

“ But man dieth,” &c. It is remark. It appears to ine so strong as to settle the able, too, that in those supposed anaquestion of itself, and without the con- logies of nature, which many Chriscurrence of other passages that might be tian writers consider as presumptive called in to its aid."

of the doctrine of a resurrection, the It would seem then that, in Mr. Heathen poets saw nothing which Good's judgment, the doctrine of a re- was thus animating and consolatory, surrection is “ definitely" taught in this but the reverse. I book, instead of being only developed ! Concerning xvi. 18, "hide no blood Yet in the sentences just quoted, he shed by me," Mr. G. affirms, “ The has done nothing more than express passage has an evident reference to the confidence of his own persuasion, the cry of the blood of Abel from the without the use of reasoning to illus- EARTH." Gen. iv. 10. trate its soundness and to vindicate it This gentleman must excuse us if from objections, Heath (not. in loc.) we say that, whenever he speaks of is equally confident on the other side: and Rosenmüller considers the 14th and 15th verses as referring to the gratify them : all that we know of him is, catastrophe of the poem : spec

that he passed his life in retirement, yet tatur tacitèque innuitur historiæ exi- very usefully and respectably, and that a tus." In the first instance Job wishes

volume of his serions, well calculated for to be concealed in the grave (13), till country congregations, is before the world.

Warburton, with most unjustifiable conthe storm of the divine anger be past. tempt, styled him the Cornish Critic: and However, he immediately corrects Bishop Lowth more than intimates that himself; apprehensive (14) that, if he Peters gave Warburton a Cornish hug die, he shall not live again. In con

“ which if a man bas once felt it to the pursequence, he determines upon wait- pose, he will be sore of as long as he lives." ing till God shall appear (15) in his Letter, &c. by a late Professor, pp. 23, 24. behalf.

(Note.) The learned and very able authort

I Contrast the declamation of Minucius
Felix (Octavius. xxxiv.) — “ Vide adeo

quam in solatiuin nostri, resurrectionein * Euripid. Medæa. I. 1.

futuram omnis natura meditetur, + The Rev. Charles Peters, A. M. Rec- expectandum nobis etiam corporis ver est" tor of St. Mabyn, Cornwall. His “ Disser- --with the well-known plaintive strains of tation,” which every theological student Moschus (Idyll. iii. 104-112). The force ought to read, is characterized by erudi- of this imagined analogy, has been ably tion, piety and acuteness. In a recent estimated in a sermon on « The Neces number of one of the monthly publications sity of Revelation to teach the Doctrine inquiries are made concerning the place of of a Future Life,” by John Kenrick, M. A. his birth, &c. We lament that we cannot pp. 14-17 (2nd. Ed.).

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but more intelligible. By “ sorcerers says, the allusion in the second clause of the day" an English reader would of the verse before us, “is necessarily naturally understand sorcerers living to the heavenly servants and angels.” at the period adverted to by the We perceive no “ opposition" in that writer or the speaker. Yet this is not clause to the first both have the the sense of the original.

same meaning; the reference being The present annotator observes simply to advocates in a court of upon ch. iv. 18, that it “ probably justice alludes to the apostacy of the angels Of Mr. Good's facility in discoverunder Satan." Now we will not deny ing probable allusions, the existence that men who are previously convinced of which may well be questioned, we of the truth of this doctrine, may be- have an indication in his note upon hold here a probable reference to it: ch. vii. 6, “Slighter than yarn are my por will we dispute that, if the tenet days." be established on independent evi- “I believe,” says he, “ with most dence, this verse may be deemed a commentators, that the allegory of confirmation of the popular belief. the web of life, as previously woven The meaning of a passage of scrip- by the fates, and tissued for every inture is to be investigated, however, dividual, was co-eval with the author on other and sounder principles. It of the present poem, and is probably must be examined, first, verbally, here referred to. It seems equally and then in respect of its connexion: to be referred to by Isaiah, xxxviii. and the interpreter must dismiss from 12." his mind a bias towards “ systematiz- For our own part, we have met ing." A man who came to the perusal with very few commentators who have of this verse before he had heard of found traces of Heathen mythology in " a defection in the heavenly host,” the book of Job. Admitting, howwould scarcely conceive that the ever, the probability that some are speaker or the poet has any such scattered throughout it (and we make event in view. Conjecture, more the concession simply for the sake of over, is not evidence: and no senti- the argument), what are the marks ments should be inculcated as revealed of this specific allegory having a place truths, on the precarious authority of in the poem? Doubtless, human life a probable allusion.

is represented both here and in Isaiah We are aware that Mr. G. renders as being analogous in certain respects the latter clause, “ and chargeth his to the operation of the weaver. What angels with default.” But, really, then! In every age and country where the original word does not express the operation is at all familiar, would an act of revolt: it signifies“ imper- not such a metaphor, such a compafection," the inferiority of even the rison, very naturally suggest itself? highest of created beings to their But, after all, where, we repeat, is Maker. Somc failure, some incon- “ the allegory of the web of life," stancy in daty, is the necessary &c. In Job and in Isaiah we have result of the comparative“ imperfec- only the wearer and the web. Where tion" of their nature. Yet how distant are the fatal scissors? Where, the this from “ the apostacy of the angels three sister-destinies? Even a schoolunder Satan!"

boy will perceive that these chaThe word translated by the anno. racteristic signs of the allegory are tator “ heavenly hosts” (v. i), is of wanting. We leave to others the invarious and extensive application; the quiry, whether this mythologic ficseveral writers of the Old Testament tion “ was co-eval with the author of using it of any beings or persons the present poem?" It is sufficient whatever who are set apart from for us to have shewn that the poem itothers, or selected to a specific office. self gives no countenance to the supIt is therefore altogether arbitrary to position. In Job ix. 26, the patriarch imagine that the heavenly hosts" complains that his “ days are passed must be here intended by the author. away as the swift ships :". and we In the concluding verses of the last should not have been greatly astonchapter men are the subject: and ished had Mr. Good discerned in the hence the presumption arises, that image a probable reference to the Arthey continue to be spoken of, and gonautic expedition; the point of chrothat Mr. G. is mistaken when he nology being first adjusted. The chief

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