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A NEW ENGLAND PARLOR OF ABOUT 1800

Showing carved wooden mantel, combined table and fire screen, and

spinet. In the Essex Institute, Salem, Mass.

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properties, which probably never exceeded 12,000 acres in a single grant, differed in no way but name from any other large plantations. The most famous of the landgraves were Thomas Smith, who was Governor in 1695, and his son, the second landgrave, whose mansion of Yeomans Hall on the Cooper River, with all its hospitality, gayety, romance, and tragedy, has been graphically though somewhat fancifully pictured by Mrs. Elizabeth A. Poyas in The Olden Time of Carolina.

Most of the plantations of South Carolina and' Georgia were smaller than those in Maryland and Virginia. A single tract rarely exceeded 2000 acres, and an entire property did not often include more than 5000 acres. These estates seem to have been on the whole more compact and less scattered than elsewhere. They lay contiguous to each other in many instances and formed large continuous areas of rice land, pine land, meadow, pasture, and swamp. Upon such plantations the colonists built substantial houses of brick and cypress, generally less elaborate than those in Virginia, particularly when they were described as of “the rustic order.” There were also tanyards, distilleries, and soaphouses, as well as all facilities for raising rice, corn, and later indigo. At first the chief staple on these

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