Pagina-afbeeldingen
PDF
ePub

stunt war with the Encabellados Indians; and more than this nothing is known of them, save that their number is very few.

RUMULHUE, a river of the district of Tolten Baxo in the kingdom of Chile; which runs s. and enters the Cauten.

RUNA-HUANAC, a large and beautiful llanura of the kingdom of Peru, to the w. of Cuzco. It is very fertile and well-peopled, and was conquered by the Inca Pachacutec, tenth emperor. Its climate is benign and healthy.

[RUNAWAY Bay, on the n.w. coast of the island of Antigua; situate between the fort on Corbizon's Point to the n. and Fort Hamilton to the*. Off it lie rocks and shoals, j

[runaway Bay, on the n. coast of the island of Jamaica, w. of Great Laughlands River and Mumby Bay, and nine or 10 miles e. of Rio Bueno.]

RUNDUBAMBA, a settlement of the province and cotregimiento of Guamalies in Peru; annexed to the curacy of the settlement of Huaicabamba.

RUNQUIN, a settlement of the province and cotregimiento of Qui Hot a in the kingdom of Chile, near the river Quillota.

[RUPERT, the n. westernmost township of Bennington County, Vermont. It contains 1033 inhabitants.]

Rupert Bay, in the island of Dominica, one of the Caribees; of great size and depth, and renowned for shelter of vessels. It is in the n. w. part, and the best bay of the island; and from it, in time of war, a commerce might intercept the trade of the W. Indies. On its shore the English have begun to build a city, with the name of Portsmouth.

Rupert, an island in the Straits of Magellan, close to the i. coast, and one of those which form the channel of S. Gabriel; between the islands Jayme and Luis le Grand.

Rupert, a river of Hudson's Bay, where the English have a factory and establishment. In lat. 57° 20' n. Long. 78° 2' w.

Rupert, a fort which was built by the French on the shore and at the entrance of the former river; but which they abandoned.

[rupert's Land, a name synonymous with that of Hudson's Bay Territory. A copy of the charter of this company may be seen in the Appendix of Dobbs's Account of Hudson's Bay.]

RUPUNUNI, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the territory and colony of the Dutch. It rises in the Cordillera,

near the equinoctial line, runs n. and enters the Esquivo.

[RUSSELL, a county of Virginia; bounded n. by Greenbrier, and s. by Lee County. Before Lee was erected out of this county, it contained 3338 inhabitants, including 190 slaves.]

[russell, a township in Hampshire County, Massachusetts; 15 miles w. of Springfield, 808 w. by s. of Boston. It was incorporated in 1792.]

[russell Island, one of the Bahamas, near Harbour Island, at the n.w. extremity ofEleuthera. It contains one or two families who have settled there.]

[RUSSIAN AMERICA. Some settlements on the n. w. coast of that continent, not very accurately defined; but for which see Vol. III. n zS 1 or this work I

'[RUTHERFORD, a county of Morgan District, N. Carolina; bounded n. by Burke, and s. by the state of S. Carolina. In 1790 it contained 7808 inhabitants, including 614 slaves; but a new county has been lately formed out of it.]

[rutherford Town, the capital of the above county. It contains a court-house, a gaol, and a few dwelling houses.]

[RUTHSBOROUGH, a village in Queen Anne's County, Maryland; on Tuckahoc Creek. Six miles s.c. of Centerville, and 7\ n.w. of Greensborough.]

[RUTLAND, a county of Vermont; bounded «. by Addison County, e. by Windsor, s. by Bennington, and w. by New York. Otter Creek, and other streams, water this county. It has also numerous lakes or ponds, well stored with fish; the chief of these are, Lakes Bombazoa, and St. Austin; the former in Hubberton and Castleton, and the latter in Wells. It contains 25 townships, and 15,565 inhabitants. Here are 14 forges, three furnaces, and a slitting-mill.]

[rutland, a post-town of Vermont, and capital of the above county, on Otter Creek; 45 miles from the mouth of that creek in Lake Champlain, 43 n. of Bennington, and 28 w. by n. of Windsor. This town and Windsor, are to be alternately the seat of government for the state. It contains a congregational church, a courthouse, and about 60 houses. Lat. 43° 34' 30" «. Long. 72° 54' 30" w. The mean heat here, according to Dr.Williams, is 43°^,

Least heat 21 Greatest heat 92 The township contains 1407 inhabitants. Pipeclay is found here, which has been wrought into crucibles that prove very durable.] . , , _ir,,

[rutland, a township of Massachusetts,

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

SABA, an island of the N. Sea; one of the Lesser Caribes. It is very pleasant, and situate 13 miles n. w. of San Eustaquio, and 24 s. w. of that of San Bartolome. It is four or five leagues in circumfi?rence, belonged at first to the Danes, and, at first sight, appears an uncultivated rock. The Dutch sent to it a colony from St. Eustace, which found a Uanura sufficiently large to maintain, with cultivation, some families; but it is still without any settlements. The fish caught on the coasts is very abundant, par icularly bonitos, which are in great request; nor is it wanting, in general, in the conveniences of life. By the coast the sea is very shallow; rocks appear for some distance, and vessels, of course, cannot come close in unless they be very small; and there is only one small bay, which has a sandy bottom, where the inhabitants can keep their canoes. At the top of this island is a passage cut in the stone, so narrow as to admit only one person; and appearing to be a sort of natural impregnable fortification. Also, in many parts, the natives have heaped up stones over some of the passes in the rocks, in such a manner that they may, by merely pulling a string, cause them to fall upon the heads of an enemy; and even so as, with one shower of stones, to destroy an army. TheFather La bat says, that this island is divided into two parts, which contain about 50 families and 130 Negroe slaves; who maintain themselves by making shoes, this being their principal branch of trade; although they cultivate some indigo, and cotton of which they make stockings. They live in perfect harmony amongst themselves; their dwellings being provided with all

[ocr errors]

Long.

[ocr errors]

necessaries. 19' a>.]

Saba, another, a small island, one of the Virgins; situate s. of St. Thomas, and belonging to the Danes.

Saba, S. a settlement and garrison of the province of Coaguila in N. America.

SABAINO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru.

SABANA, a small settlement, or ward, of the head settlement of the district of Orizaba, and alcaldia mayor of Ixmiquilpan in Nueva Espaiia r united to the settlement of San Juan, ana five leagues w. of its capital. . T

Sab An A, another settlement, in the province and government of Santa Marta and Nuevc* Reyno de Granada; of the district of the Rio del Hacha, in the royal road.

Sabana, another, with the addition of Grande, in the province and government of Cartagena, of the same kingdom as the former; situate on the shore of the Dique, between the rivers Malambo and Santo Tomas. .•!

Sabana, another, of the province and government of Trinidad; situate on the v>. coast, and within the Gulf of Trieste. ,

Sabana, another, with the addition of Alta, in the same kingdom as the former, and very near to it.

Sabana, another, with the same additional title, in the jurisdiction of Santiago de la Atalaya, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada; situate to the s. between two rivers.

Sabana, another, with the addition of Larga, in the province and government of Cartagena, and Nuevo Reyno de Granada; situate in the road which leads down to the river of La Magdalena, and on the shore of a lake which originates from the Dique.

Sab An A, a large valley of the island of St. Domingo,, in the e. head; on the shore of the coast of the great bay of Samana, between the rivers Nicagua and Magua.

SABANAS, a river of the province and government of Darien and kingdom of Tierra Firme; which rises in the mountains of the s. coast, and enters the sea in the Gulf of San Miguel.

SABANILLA, a settlement of the province and government of Cartagena, and Nuevo Reyno de Granada; on a point of the coast which runs into the sea, opposite the island Verde.

SABANDIJAS, a river of the province and government of Mariquita, in the same kingdom as the former settlement. It runs e. and enters the Grande de la Magdalena.

SABARA, a small river of the province and captains/iip of Espiritu Santo in Brazil.

SABAYA, a settlement of the province and corregimieMo of Carangas in Peru; annexed to the curacy of Huachocalla. It was formerly very large and numerous, but at present much reduced, since it was ruined in 1600 by an irruption of the volcano Ornate. It has a sanctuary of Nuestra Senora de la Candelaria, which is much frequented.

SABIANGO, a large river of the province and corregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom of Quito; which rises in the mountains of Pandomine, and runs to. till it enters by the to. part the Macara, in lat. 25' s.

SABINA, S. a port of the coast, in the province and government of Sonora, in the Gulf of California, having at its entrance the island of San Pedro. *

SABINAS, Santiago De Las, a settlement and real of mines of silver of the Nuevo Reyno de Leon in N. America. It has 30 families of Spaniards, and in its district are two estates where they grind metals. It abounds in large and small cattle and sugar canes, of which they make honey and sugar. On the n. it is inhabited by the district of the infidel Indians, and lies in the direct road to the province of Texas. Twentytwo leagues n. e. of its capital.

Sabinas, a river of the province of Gila in" Nueva Espafia. It enters the sea in the Gulf of Mexico, between that of San Pedro and El Bravo.

SABIROSQUI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxa uiarquilla in Peru.

SABLE, an island of the Atlantic Ocean, 35 leagues s.e. of Cape Breton, where the Baron Leti attempted to establish a colony in 1598, but could not, according to Father Charlevoix, find a place fit for the purpose, as it is small, without any port, and producing nothing but plums. It is also very narrow, and forms the figure of a bow. It is not more than 10 leagues in circumference, and in its centre is a lake of five leagues in circumference. At the two extremities are two large strands, lying very high, and which, in clear weather, are discovered at seven or eight leagues at sea. In lat. 44° 15' n. Long. 59J 2' ».

Sable, a settlement and parish of the island St. Christopher, one of the Antilles; situate on the s. e. coast, near the point of the same name, in one of the divisions possessed by the French, before they became masters of the whole, and when they divided its possession with the English. It has a very good castle of a square figure, and at a small distance from this the English constructed another, for a defence of their boundary limits.

Sable, the aforesaid point of land, on the to. coast.

Sable, a small river of Canada in N.America, which runs n. and enters the lake Superior, between the point of Kioveounam and the river Tonnagane.

Sable, another, a small river of the same province, which runs e. between those of San Nicolas and Blanche, and enters Lake Michigan.

Sable, another, a small river of the province and country of the Iroquees; which runs to. between those of Asuncion and Famine, and enters the lake Ontario.

Sable, another, a small river of Nova Scotia or Acadia, which runs nearly due s. and enters the sea opposite the Brown Bank.

Sable, a large sand-bank, near the coast of the same province as the former river, which ex, tends to. from the island of its name.

Sable, a cape or point of land of the coast, in the province of Nova Scotia or Acadia. [Lat. 43° 30' ft. Long. 65° 33' to. Variation of the needle in 1787, 12° 15' o.)

Sable, a bay of the lake Superior in Canada, in the e. part; close to the Bay of Michipicoton.

tSable, Cape, the s. to. point of the peninsula lorida; 33 leagues e. n. e. three-quarters e. of the s. to. point of the Dry Tortuga Shoals. J

[sable, Great and Little, two rivers emptying into Lake Champlain, from the to. side. Great Sable River is not far from the Saranac, and is scarcely 60 yards wide. On this stream are remarkable falls. The whole descent of the water is about 200 feet, in several pitches, the greatest of which is 40 feet perpendicular. At the foot of it the water is unfathomable. A large pine has been seen, in a freshet, to pitch over endwise, and remain several minutes under water. The stream is confined by high rocks on either side, a space of 40 feet; and the banks at the falls are at least as many feet high. In a freshet, the flood wood frequently lodges, and in the few minutes the water rises to full banks, and then bursts away its obstructions, with a most tremendous crashing.]

[sable Point, on the w. side of the island of Newfoundland. Lat. 50° 24' n. Long. 57° 35'w.~\

SABLES, Grandes, a bay of the s. coast of Lake Superior in New France or Canada, near the e. head.

[sables, Riviere Aux. See Black River, a water of Lake Ontario.]

SABLON, a bay on the coast of the country and land of Labrador; at the entrance of the Strait of Belleisle.

[sablon. See Sandy.]

SABLONEUX, a river of the province and country of N. Carolina; which runs n. e. then turns n. and enters the Ohio.

SablonEux, another, a small river, in the same province as the former. It runs to the same rhumb, and enters also the Ohio.

Saboniere. See Maligne.

SABOYA, a small settlement of the corregimiento of the city of Veley, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is of a cold temperature, but healthy, and produces few fruits. It has 50 housekeepers and as many other Indians and Zambos, a body divided from the rest. Seven leagues from Chiquinquira.

SABRAL, a settlement of the province and captainship of Rio Grande in Brazil, near the coast; between the rivers Carabatang and Camaratuba.

[SAC, Grande Riviere Du Col De, a river of the island of St. Domingo, which rises in Montague de la Selle, by two branches; takes a semicircular course of 12 leagues, and runs w. into the sea, about two leagues n. of Port au Prince.]

SACABA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cochabamba in Peru.

SACACA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Charcas in Peru; [67 miles n.n.

Vol. IV.

w. from the city of La Plata, and 94 s. s. e. of La Paz.] It is also called Sicasica, and was formerly a large and populous town, but now reduced to a miserable state. Its climate is cold, [and it is situate on a s. head branch of the Rio Grande or Guapey, in lat. 18° 40' s.]

SACADAS, a settlement of the province and

government of Buenos Ayres, s. of the town of man.

SACAGUAR, a river of the province of Barcelona and government of Cumana in Nueva Andalucia. It rises j. of the town of Aragua, runs w. and enters the Huere.

SACAN, San Pedro De, a settlement of the head settlement of Uruapan, and alcaldia mayor of Valladolid in the province and bishopric of Mechoacan. It contains 80 families of Indians and five of Mustees. Eight leagues w. of its head settlement.

SACAPA, a settlement of the province and government of Yucatan ; situate in the high road to Guatemala.

Sacapa, San Pedro De, another settlement, the head settlement of the district of the province and alcaldia mayor of Chiquimula in the kingdom of Guatemala. It contains more than 2000 Indians, including those of three other set-' tlements annexed to its curacy.

SACAPECPAN, S. Gregorio De, a settlement of the head settlement of the district and alcaldia mayor of Cholula in Nueva Espaiia. It contains 78 families of Indians, and is one league w. of its capital.

SACAPULA, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of Chiapa in the kingdom of Guatemala.

SACATECOLUCA, Santiago Lucia De, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of San Vincente de Austria in the kingdom of Guatemala; on the coast of the S. Sea, and to the w. of the river Salbutiqui. It contains more than 3100 Indians. [There is a burning mountain near the town of this name. The volcano of Stt Salvadore is more ». about 30 miles, and 12 e. of BernaL]

SACATEPEC, Santa Maria De, a settlement of the head settlement of the district and alcaldia mayor of Cholula in Nueva Espaiia. It contains 26 families of Indians, and is two leagues to. of its capital.

Sacatepec, another, in the head settlement of Atitlan and alcaldia mayor of Villalta in the same kingdom. It contains 115 families of Indians, and is 15 leagues from its capital.

Sacatepec, another, of the province and king3a

dom of Guatemala; situate near the settlement of Pinula.

Sacatepec, another, which is the head settlement of the district, of the province and corregi~ miento of Amatitan, in the same kingdom as the former.

Sacatepec, another, of the same province and kingdom as the former, but distinct from it.

SACAHUCHEN. Some mountains of the province and government of Campeche.

SACHENDAGO, a settlement of the province and colony of New York in N. America, to the w. of Lake Cadaroses.

SACHICA, a principal and head settlement of the district of the corregimiento of its name, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is small, containing only 50 families and 30 Indians; but its temperature is benign, and it abounds in wheat, maize, barley, and other vegetable productions.

SACHICHIS, a barbarous nation of Indians of the kingdom of Peru, descended from that of the Lamas, with the which it is united; and these form together a settlement of the same name, and which has the title of city.

SACKVTLLE, a settlement of the province and colony of Nova Scotia, near the s. coast, at the mouth of the river St. Croix. In its vicinity the English have built a fort. It is n. of Halifax.

[SACO Falls, situate on Saco River in the district of Maine, five miles from the sea. The river is here divided by Indian Island, consisting of about 30 acres of land, and on each side of it tumbles over a precipice of rocks, and mixes with the tide. The prospect from the c. side of the island is very sublime and majestic. From the beginning of the falls, to the tide below, the difference of height is above 40 feet. There are many corn and saw mills; on the falls, and below the island, is a fine bason, where vessels take in their cargoes. Salmon Falls are 10 miles above this.]

[saco River, is one of the three largest rivers in the district of Maine. The principal part of its waters fall from the White Mountains. Its course, some distance from its source, is s.; it then suddenly bends to the w. and crosses into the district of Maine, and then makes a large bend to the n. e. and s. w. embracing the fine township of Fryburge, in the county of York. Its general course thence to the sea is s. e. Great and Little Ossipee Rivers fall into it from the w. This river is navigable for ships to Saco Falls, about five miles from the sea. Here the river

is broken by Indian Island, over which is the post-road. A bridge is thrown over each of the branches. A number of mills are erected here, to which logs are floated from 40 or 50 miles above; and vessels can come quite to the mills to take in the lumber. Four million feet of pine boards were annually sawed at these mills before the war. The mouth of this river lies five miles n. e. of Cape Porpoise. There is a bar which will not allow a vessel of above 100 tons burden to pass, if fully loaded. Without the bar, and between Fletcher's Neck and the main land, is a pool, wherein vessels of any size may lie at all seasons of the year, and take in their ladings at pleasure.

On the w. side of the river a small neck of land divides it from the pool, which might be easily cut, and so save the hazard of passing the bar. On the branches of this river, as well as on the main stream, are a great many mills and valuable works: 25 miles from the sea a small stream, issuing from Little Ossipee Pond in New Hampshire, joins it; and 15 miles further up Great Ossipee River, from another pond, in New Hampshire, swells the Saco, and impels its course.

Proceeding up the Saco, its source is found on the side of the White Mountains in New Hampshire. From these mountains the waters run into Connecticut, Saco, and Androscoggin Rivers. Saco River meanders through the ancient Indian village of Peckwalket, 60 miles from the sea. In 1775, a new river burst into the Saco, from the White Mountains, and still continues to aid Saco and a branch of it, called Ellis's River. A mixture of iron ore, gave the waters a red colour for a few days, and the people on the upper banks had a report, that the river was bloody, which they considered as an ill omen to the public concerns.]

Saco, a city of the same province and colony as the former river, at the mouth of it, and having in its vicinity a fort belonging to the English.

SACONET. See Rehoboth.

SACRAMENTO, a city and colony which was held by the Portuguese, in the province and government of Buenos Ayres; situate opposite this capital [and 33 miles n. e. from it], on the shore of the river La Plata. The Portuguese established themselves here in 1678, but in 1680 the city was taken by the Spaniards, commanded by the governor of the province, Don Joseph de Garro. Shortly afterwards it was recovered by the former, and then, for the second time, taken

« VorigeDoorgaan »