The Maid of Orleans, and Other Poems

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John Owen, 1843 - 229 pagina's

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Pagina 216 - So dear to Heaven is saintly chastity, That, when a soul is found sincerely so, A thousand liveried angels lackey her, Driving far off each thing of sin and guilt...
Pagina 210 - Where throngs of knights and barons bold, In weeds of peace, high triumphs hold, With store of ladies, whose bright eyes Rain influence, and judge the prize Of wit or arms, while both contend To win her grace whom all commend.
Pagina 216 - Driving far off each thing of sin and guilt; And, in clear dream and solemn vision, Tell her of things, that no gross ear can hear; Till oft converse with heavenly habitants Begin to cast a beam on th
Pagina 210 - ... knights ; and the third, for the old warriors. The lady of the castle, surrounded by youthful beauties, distributed crowns to those who were declared, by the judges of the combat, to be the conquerors. She then, in her turn, opened her court, constituted in imitation of the seignorial tribunals, and as her baron collected his peers around him, when he dispensed justice, so did she form her Court of Love, consisting of young, beautiful, and lively women. A new career was opened to those who dared...
Pagina 208 - ON THE most solemn occasions, in the disputes for glory, in the games called Tensons, when the Troubadours combated in verse before illustrious princes, or before the Courts of Love, they were called upon to discuss questions of the most scrupulous delicacy and the most disinterested gallantry. We find them inquiring, successively, by what qualities a lover may render himself most worthy of his mistress; how a knight may excel all his rivals; and whether it be a greater grief to lose a lover by death...
Pagina 211 - Love were able to reply to the verses which they inspired. A few of their compositions only remain, but they have always the advantage over those of the Troubadours. Poetry, at that time, aspired neither to creative energy nor to sublimity of thought, nor to variety. Those powerful conceptions of genius which, at a later period, have given birth to the drama and the epic, were yet unknown ; and, in the expression of sentiment, a tenderer and more delicate inspiration naturally endowed the productions...
Pagina 213 - I am the sonne of the noble Duke of Orleaunce ; more 'glad to be his bastarde, with a meane livyng, than the lawful sonne of that coward cuckolde Cawny, with his four thousand crownes.
Pagina 209 - Not unfrequently, — as must be the case with those who aim at constructing a system of morals by the aid of talent alone, and who do not found it on experience, — the most pernicious sentiments, and principles entirely incompatible with the good order of society and the observation of other duties, were ranked amongst the laws of gallantry. It is, however, very creditable to the Provencal poetry, that it displays a veneration for the beauties of chivalry; and that it has preserved, amidst all...
Pagina 223 - He saw, judged, spake his sovereign will, And, at the mandate, both were still. — HE VANISHED ; — on a lonely isle, In languor closed his days, A mark for envy's baleful smile, For pity's softest lays, For inextinguishable hate, And love, triumphant over fate. As on the shipwrecked wretch's head The o'erwhelming billow weighs, From which, but now, with arms outspread And wandering, wistful gaze, He vainly strove, whilst heaved on high, Some far-off headland to descry ; Thus on that soul the gathering...
Pagina 210 - ... hand. Courts of love were first established in Provence during the brightest times of the Troubadours. Sismondi has described these courts. Tensons, or jeux partis, were sung : they were a kind of dialogue between singers, in which each interlocutor recited successively a stanza with the same rhymes. The lady of the castle, surrounded by youthful beauties, distributed crowns to those who had distinguished themselves in arms. Then she formed her Court of Love, consisting of young and beautiful...

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