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not at all feel laid under obligation, even should he hold by it until the Corinthians acknowledged it—"If we have sown unto you spiritual things, is it a great thing if we shall reap your carnal things?" (ver. 11.) It is not: for “who goeth a warfare at any time on his own charges ? who planteth a vineyard, and eateth not of the fruit thereof? or who feedeth a flock, and eateth not of the milk of the flock? Say I these things as a man? or saith not the law the same also ? For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn. Doth God take care for oxen? Or saith he it altogether for our sakes? For our sakes no doubt” (ver. 7–10). The quotation from the law of Moses is made from Deut. xxx. 4, where the usual Hebrew word for ox (shor) is used. The Greek equivalent (bous) occurs here. The text is one of many which indicate that deep spiritual meaning lies in Old Testament words which, as first employed, seemed to have relations only to very common earthly matters. In the Epistle to Timothy the right which Paul claimed for himself and Barnabas is, by special direction, made over to others. “Let the elders that rule well be counted worthy of double honour, especially they who labour in the word and doctrine. For the Scripture saith, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox that treadeth out the corn. And, the labourer is worthy of his hire” (1 Tim. v. 17, 18). With the Gentiles it seems to have been otherwise in their dealings with the labouring yoke. But God wished his people to differ, even as regards their care of the oxen, and under this simple illustration · he brought them in contact with great and vital truths. Where the Gentiles did not muzzle the patient oxen, they appear to have permitted them to take the straw only. An interesting proof of this was brought to light by the younger Champollion, in 1828. He found on an Egyptian monument, of very ancient date, a picture of peasants engaged on the threshing-floor, and, in hieroglyphics, the following song written over their heads :

" Tread ye out for yourselves,
Tread ye out for yourselves,

O oxen!
Tread ye out for yourselves,
Tread ye out for yourselves,

The straw;
For
men, who are your masters,

The grain.

“The Fellahs of the present day," says Gliddon, “sing in all their agricultural occupations; and the words of their simple melodies are

PLATE 13

[graphic]

2. Vite or forum cuf Augustus

Forum of Iraan

6. Bradley detin

1 Arch of Septimius Severus
23 Adriano
3 Temple of Intoninus & Faustina
4 Temple of Remus
5 Temple or leave

1 Ora Farnesiani
12. Maria liberatrice
1: Temple or Jupiter ,lator

6 sta Francesa
7 Temple or Venus & Rome
8 Veta ulans
9.trh ortantina
20. Arch Trus

16 Temple or fortune
Temple o: Jullinan

Phu

22.1111

ANCIENT ROME.-Acts ii. 10; xix. 21; xxviii. 16: Rox. xvi.

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