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His hoáry locks bespeak his lengthen'd years,
Why quakes his step, or why gush forth his tears ?
Ah! Morar, 'tis thy sire, in lonely age,
No son hath he his sorrow to assuage !
Weep, hoary father, he deserves thy tears,
In misery weep, although no Morar hears !
No dreams across the silent mansion roam,
The dust their pillow, for the grave their home ;-
All in that dreary region is forgot ;
Call on thy Morar—but he hears thee not!
When from the east shall rays of joy be shed,
To bid the sleeper leave his dewy bed ;
Farewell to thee, the mightiest of the hill
Knelt at thy feet, and own'd thee greater still !
No son hast thou to imitate his sire,
Endued with all thy virtues, and thy fire !
No son hast thou, but still the song shall flow,-
Remotest ages thy renown shall know,
And wrapt in wonder at thy mighty name,
Admire thy valour, and preserve its fame!

ROUGE ET NOIR.

d away

The host of tourists who have ma Or any thing, in short, in which he shonerauded on the continent within these He answered— Cun he voin at Rouge et few years, have made us familiar with Noir ?' its sights, and weary of them. Paris, His keen eye finishing the phrase if so, as the most accessible, has been the He does what no one else can do, you

know.'" most infested ; and its caveaus and caffés, its spruce theatres, and squalid This is neatly expressed, and the churches, have been reiterated on us description of the Board, probably a in every existing dialect, from Mayfair difficult task in poetry, our author has to Whitechapel. But after this cum- executed very cleverly.-P. 35-28. brous plunder, there are left rare bi The Palais Royal next comes under joux, and the eye which will look into this pleasant pen, and its world of the interior of Parisian manners, may wicked wonders is described with unbe pronounced to have entered, as old usual spirit. We are not exhausted by Vestris said of the Minuet, on a study a toilsome and feeble recapitulation of extensive enough to last him his life. the absurdities or allurements of a The author of the present poem has place, over which the spirit of the Reapplied himself to a fragment of the gent Orleans seems still to hover; the Palais Royal, and from this has gene- poem strikes at once upon its characrated a volume of verses, alternately teristics, and then darts away

in

purpathetic and jocular, moral and satiri- suit of the original topic. cal. The mention of Frescati, and the Salon, is a mere digression; the syste

5. It forms an oblong square with a piazza, matic interest is gathered round the Parterres and liine tree alleys in the centre: two apartments in the Palais Royal, There's not an inch, I'm sure, from Ghent

to Gaza, where so many miserables of all ages Where youthful blood so much requires a and tongues are undone in the inost

Mentor: expeditious manner every night of the Among a thousand other things, it has a year. His theme is the Rouge et Noir Superb jet d'eau, which strikes you as you table, at which, he protests, that no man can win, and quotes an authority But closely wedged Boutiques and Cafés high among the mighty and undone lend it gamblers of mankind.

An air, I think, much more bizarre than

splendid. “ 'Tis said, when any told Napoleon That such or such a man had talents, or “ It is a focus where each principle Whose depth of head might be depended on Of thought and act concentrate to a spot ; In mathematics, diplomacy, war,

Where gold is most omnipotent, and will

enter :

A Poem ; in six cantos, with other Poems. London. Olliers. Pp. 215. 12mo.

sees :

rooms

Buy love or lace there's nothing can't be bability, have slept unthanked, but for me bought :

Lord Byron and Mr. Frere. After all, A world in miniature, where equal skill this is an idle delicacy, the stanza is Is taught in sin and scienceboth are free to the human race, « like a wild. Det

taught! With dancing, fencing, metaphysics, cheat- Imitation is of an altogether different

goose dies unclaimed of any man." ing, And other things which don't abide re

family. If this were the place to peating.

trouble ourselves with laying down the " It is the heart of Paris, and impels

law on this subject, we should say, Warm poision through her wanton arteriess that there is no imitation except where The honeycomb of vice, whose thousand the peculiarities of an author are transcells

ferred. Crabbe's clearness of rustic Pour forth the buzzing multitude one description, his vigorous seizure of the

form and pressure of village habits, Loose-trowser'd beaux, and looser-morald and his shrewd and simple pleasantry belles ;

on obscure ambition and petty vanity, fakt With ancient quizzes underneath the trees may attract authorship to the investiReading the daily journals, or conversing; gation of rural life. But the similarity And, here and there, a black-eyed Grisctte of subject is not imitation, nor is the nursing."

encreased acuteness of inquiry, nor is In the Palais Royal, the Nos. 109, the more pointed vigour of versificaand 154, have probably had a larger tion, nor is the mixture of seriousness proportion of visitants of all nations and pleasantry ; for all of those may be than any other spot in Paris. Their have arisen naturally in the course of tube charm is the possession of the Roulet, the general and individual improve and Rouge et Noir tables. If there ment of poetry, It might as well be ever should be a general history of asserted, that every man who looks vice, the annals of those two suites of through a telescope, is a degraded imi

may form the most pregnant and tator of Galileo; or that the whole pe: most original portion. Half the crimes, rising generation, with their unshatterand all the suicides of Paris, are con- ed faces, are nothing better than pluncocted within those walls. They stand derers of Jenner, and the Glostershire in the centre of the most profligate milk-maids. spot in Europe, and they deserve to T'he true imitation of Crabbe would stand in its centre. The whole distriet be in his pressure of trivialities into is the classic ground of iniquity, but the service; in his sending out, stamped within those boundaries are the Campi with equal labour, the unimportant Phlegræi,

and the valuable specimens of his mua From the Palais Royal the poet mismata rustica ; in the Dutch delight strays to Frescati, the fantastie name of his painted straws, and flies on tan. of a celebrated gaming-house on the kards, and red-nosed Boors in extravaBoulevards, the resort of the better gant frolic or maudlin repentance. dressed ruffians of Paris, and of Lon Lord Byron's strength of expression, don. Want of room prevents us from and that decision of view by which giving a number of other extracts he passes over the feebler features of from this clever and ingenious volume, the terrain, and seizes on the commandwhich we understand is from the pen ing points, are common property, neiof a gentlemen of the name of Read, ther his discovery nor that of any man and which does equal honour to his living, but as old as poetry and nature. head and heart.

He may, like other men of talents, The selection of the 'Ottava Rimg have assisted in leading the authorship was judicious, from the general facility of England back into the original track of the measure, and perhaps from it from which bad taste and evil times having become popular through Beppa had turned it away, yet to which it and Whistlecraft. But the use of any was rapidly reverting. But he was not thing that has been used before, seems the earliest even of his day, who stood to sit painfully on the author's con upon the hill and made signals to the science, and he accordingly attempts multitude wandering through the shade to lighten his obligation to the mo, and the valley. The “Lay of the Last derns, by shewing that they were in- Minstrel," if we are to distinguish a debted to a remote ancestry. But peculiar agency, was the morning star Chaucer and Fuirfax would, in all pro- of the modern age. But the transit

of

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howerful and brilliant intelligences If he has Childe Harold on his table,

cross the same region, is free and glo- and reads it at breakfast, he must tous still, and no invasion of the orbit sleep with Don Juan under his pillow,

that glittering leader of the day. and make it the matter of his dreams. 1 The true doctrine is, that imitation The nobler genius will turn away

mnot be laid to the poet's charge, but from this prone idolatry, both because a here there is an adoption of defect. he cannot stoop, and because, if he Larvility is the soul of imitation. It could, he disdains to stoop. He will maust be laid in the indictment that the not insolently reject the inventions of meathor has been excited to the com- other men when they can assist him cuission of absurdity by the instigation in the common object of all the greater mai some potential evil spirit that has minds—the delight and instruction of usuade the offence prevalent over his his species. If on the height to which iebler love of common sense. To con- he had climbed by the vigour of his mm. ct him on the statute, proof must be natural powers, he finds the wings

rought not of excellence, but of error. which had been invented by some tovarnassus will throw out the bill, al- powerful wanderer through the brilnaging that a writer has been guilty liant realm that lies above the reach bien ? Byronism, on no more substantive of ordinary mankind, he would not ino-large, than that he has force of ex- fling himself wingless upon the air. udression and depth of thought-that his The noble invention would be turned

fenagination is vivid, or his sensibility to a purpose worthy of its nobleness, (xciteable. To secure a conviction, it and some unconquered portion of the

aust be proved that he has a propensity new region would be brought within de o» laud and magnify the bolder vices; the common dominion of the mind. cartoon select for his heroes compounds of The perfection of poetry consists in a mae desperate aud the malignant; and the problem,“ to express the greatest od feel his triumph in making the ruf- number of thoughts in the smallest ans of the earth estimate their talents number of words.” Condensation is

their profligacy. The same induc- power. The finest poetic mind is the’ ion may lead us to the imitators of most fertile of thought ;-the most: he other prominent writers; but, in vivid poetic expression is the most com

Il cases, the conclusion is irresistible, pressed. Prolixity is in poetry what ex-
Cren bat, as imitation is a literary crime, pansion is in physics,-the waste, the

nd as excellence is not criminal, de- scattering away into an invisibility and
iciency must be theobject of the charge. feebleness, the mighty agency that
The imitator must imitate to the ex- . Wants only coinpression to move, or
ent of losing his judgment-he must : perhaps disrupt the frame of the world.
pe so bowed down before his Pope, that But these truths are as old as Homer,
le cannot recover his posture, but or as man. Lord Byron has failed in
nust continue in a perpetual oscula- dramatic writing, the first in dignity,
ion of the pontific toe. He must swear by the want of this compression. The
chat my Lord Peter's loaf contains the bonds of rhyme seem essential to his
essence of bread, mutton, beer, and all vigour. Blank-verse suffers him to
other nutriments and condiments. He wander away into endless diffusion,
must gradually acquire the inverted He is thus still below the summit of
taste that loves the worst as well as, poetry, and must be so until he shall
or better than the best of the ensla- have produced a drama capable of
ver's attributes ;-not merely worship standing beside those of the elder glo-
the jewels on his Sultan's cap, but lick rious time of England,
up the dust shaken from his slippers.

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sees :

Buy love or lace-there's nothing can't be bability, have slept unthanked, but for bought :

Lord Byron and Mr Frere. After all, A world in miniature, where equal skill this is an idle delicacy, the stanza is Is taught in sin and science-both are free to the human race, « like a wild

taught ! With dancing, fencing, metaphysics, cheat. Imitation is of an altogether different

goose flies unclaimed of any man.' ing, And other things which don't abide re

family. If this were the place to peating.

trouble ourselves with laying down the " It is the heart of Paris, and impels

law on this subject, we should say,

that there is no imitation except where Warm poision through her wanton arteries 6 The honeycomb of vice, whose thousand the peculiarities of an author are transcells

ferred. Crabbe's clearness of rustic Pour forth the buzzing multitude one description, his vigorous seizure of the

form and pressure of village habits, Loose-trowser'd beaux, and looser-morald and his shrewd and simple pleasantry belles ;

on obscure ambition and petty vanity, With ancient quizzes underneath the trees may attract authorship to the investiReading the daily journals, or conversing; gation of rural life. But the similarity And, here and there, a black-eyed Grisette of subject is not imitation, nor is the nursing."

encreased acuteness of inquiry, nor is In the Palais Royal, the Nos. 109, the more pointed vigour of versificaand 154, have probably had a larger tion, nor is the mixture of seriousness proportion of visitants of all nations and pleasantry; for all of those may than any other spot in Paris. Their have arisen naturally in the course of charm is the possession of the Roulet, the general and individual improveand Rouge et Noir tables. If there ment of poetry, It might as well.be ever should be a general history of asserted, that every man who looks vice, the annals of those two suites of through a telescope, is a degraded imirooms may form the most pregnant and tator of Galileo; or that the whole most original portion. Half the crimes, rising generation, with their unshatterand all the suicides of Paris, are con- ed faces, are nothing better than pluncocted within those walls. They stand derers of Jenner, and the Glostershire in the centre of the most profligate milk-maids. spot in Europe, and they deserve to The true imitation of Crabbe would stand its centre. The whole district be in his pressure of trivialities into is the classic ground of iniquity, but the service; in his sending out, stamped within those boundaries are the Campi with equal labour, the unimportant Phlegræi.

and the valuable specimens of his nuFrom the Palais Royal the poet mismata rustica; in the Dutch delight strays to Frescați, the fantastic name of his painted straws, and flies on tanof a celebrated gaming-house on the kards, and red-nosed Boors in extravaBoulevards, the resort of the better gant frolic or maudlin repentance. dressed ruffians of Paris, and of Lon Lord Byron's strength ot'expression, don. Want of room prevents us from and that decision of view by which giving a number of other extracts he passes over the feebler feature's of from this clever and ingenious volume, the terrain, and seizes on the commandwhich we understand is from the pen ing points, are common property, neiof a gentlemen of the name of Read, ther his discovery nor that of and which does equal honour to his living, but as old as poetry and nature. head and heart.

He may, like other men of talents, The selection of the 'Ottava Rima have assisted in leading the authorship was judicious, from the general facility of England back into the original track of the measure, and perhaps from it from which bad taste and evil times having become popular through Beppo had turned it away, yet to which it and Whistlecraft. But the use of any was rapidly reverting. But he was not thing that has been used before, seems the earliest even of his day, who stood to sit painfully on the author's con- upon the hill and made signals to the science, and he accordingly attempts multitude wandering through the shade to lighten his obligation to the mo- and the valley. The “ Lay of the Last derns, by shewing that they were in- Minstrel,” if we are to distinguish a debted to a remote ancestry. But peculiar agency, was the morning star Chaucer and Fuirfux would, in all pro- of the modern age. But the transit of

any man

ft powerful and brilliant intelligences If he has Childe Harold on his table,

across the same region, is free and glo- and reads it at breakfast, he must

rious still, and no invasion of the orbit sleep with Don Juan under his pillow, a of that glittering leader of the day. and make it the matter of his dreams.

The true doctrine is, that imitation The nobler genius will turn away - cannot be laid to the poet's charge, but from this prone idolatry, both because

where there is an adoption of defect. he cannot stoop, and because, if he

Servility is the soul of imitation. It could, he disdains to stoop. He will b. must be laid in the indictment that the 'not insolently reject the inventions of

author has been excited to the com- other men when they can assist him mission of absurdity by the instigation in the common object of all the greater

of some potential evil spirit that has minds—the delight and instruction of I made the offence prevalent over his his species. If on the height to which

feebler love of common sense. To con- . he had climbed by the vigour of his vict him on the statute, proof must be natural powers, he finds the wings : brought not of excellence, but of error. which had been invented by some - Parnassus will throw out the bill, al- powerful wanderer through the brilleging that a writer has been guilty liant realm that lies above the reach

of Byronism, on no more substantive of ordinary mankind, he would not ir charge, than that he has force of ex- fling himself wingless upon the air.

pression and depth of thoughtthat his The noble invention would be turned Ta imagination is vivid, or his sensibility to a purpose worthy of its nobleness, la exciteable. To secure a conviction, it and some unconquered portion of the

must be proved that he has a propensity new region would be brought within to laud and magnify the bolder vices; the common dominion of the mind.

to select for his heroes compounds of The perfection of poetry consists in I the desperate and the malignant; and the problem, “ to express the greatest

to feel his triumph in making the ruf- number of thoughts in the smallest; fians of the earth estimate their talents number of words.” Condensation is by their profligacy. The same induc- power. The finest poetic mind is the tion may lead us to the imitators of most fertile of thought ;--the most the other prominent writers; but, in vivid poeticexpression is the most comall cases, the conclusion is irresistible, pressed. Prolixity is in poetry what exthat, as imitation is a literary crime, pansion physics,--the waste, the and as excellence is not criminal, de- scattering away into an invisibility and ficiency must be the object of the charge. feebleness, the mighty agency that

The imitator must imitate to the ex- . wants only coinpression to move, or tent of losing his judgment—he must perhaps disrupt the frame of the world. be so bowed down before his Pope, that But these truths are as old as Homer, he cannot recover his posture, but or as man. Lord Byron has failed in must continue in a perpetual oscula- dramatic writing, the first in dignity, tion of the pontific toe. He must swear by the want of this compression. The that my Lord Peter's loaf contains the bonds of rhyme seem essential to his essence of bread, mutton, beer, and all vigour. Blank-verse suffers him to other nutriments and condiments. He wander away into endless diffusion. must gradually acquire the inverted He is thus still below the summit of taste that loves the worst as well as, poetry, and must be so until he shall or better than the best of the ensla- have produced a drama capable of ver's attributes ;-not merely worship standing beside those of the elder glothe jewels on his Sultan's cap, but lick rious time of England, up the dust shaken from his slippers.

Vol. X.

30

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