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22.
As for myself, I own I'd feel inclined

To visit foreign parts : could I provide
That we should always have a favouring wind,

I would not care so much about the tide.
Just to a tittle it would suit my mind

On nice smooth water merrily to ride,
And as at sea I always eat much more
Than when on land, I'd have of prog good store.

23.
On these conditions I should like to take

A trip “ around* the world like Captain Cook.”
It would be just a pretty sort of freak,

And then I could endite a handsome book.
Some dozen leaves of manuscript would make

A good sized quarto, if we only took
Some pains to put a type, round, tall, and large in,
And leave about a half a foot of margin.t

24.
I'd like to visit China very much,

And crack a bottle with a Mandarine;
I'd like to rove through Russia, at least such

Places as where Circassians can be seen;
I should not care a damn about the Dutch,

Though I must own I love their racy gin:
No Spain for me, though raised to be a Grandee ;
But France I always relish'd for its Brandy.

25.
I'd wish to spend a month in Italy

For many reasons. There the wine is good;
The dark-eyed damas are all frank and free;

But I am told they overboil their food.
In Switzerland they don't live jollily,

And mountaineersț are somehow always rude.
But lest my readers should not like my taste,
Back to my tale I make all proper haste.

26.
The goose, as I remark'd before, had fled

Some dozen leagues to sea, and Daniel gave
In thought at least his frame a wat’ry bed ;

When steering forward, dashing back the wave,
A ship along the foaming waters sped :

Dan here began to bawl. “Oh! save, Oh! save
A Christian from a wat’ry grave,” he cried
To those below, when he the vessel spied.

27.
She seem'd a cutter from the west of France,

Seventy ton burthen, thirteen hands on board,
Which drove a trade 'twixt th' Irish coast and Nantz,

With silks and lace, but most with brandy stored.
Close to the wind she lay; a single glance

Would see 'twas Bantry she was making tow'rd.
Her sides were painted black, she lay quite low,
And both for reasons which perhaps you know.

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• Either Whistlecraft stole this from me, or I from Whistlecraft. I leave it to the reader to decide. + Charta impressorum maxima, lineæ, ubi Apparent raræ nantes in margine vasto.

Epil. to Phormio at Westminster School. * Witness the Gallovegian, and other Borderers.

28.
In fact she was a smuggler. At that time

France did with us a great deal in that way,
But at this period when I pen my rhyme,

'Tis all given up-extinguish'd I may say.
The war has changed the taste, and we must chime

In with the times, and smuggle what will pay.
Instead of lace and silk for those who lack hose,
What we run now is commonly tobaccoes.

29.
Dan roar'd, but might have roar'd for ever there;

None could have heard his wailing or lament;
He then address’d the goose in suppliant prayer,

And begg’d him to have pity and relent ;
But he might just as well address the air,

For still the bird on wing expanded went.
“ Then, since you'll neither travel down nor stop,
Will you be kind enough to let me drop?”-

30.
“ Pray, don't be foolish, Dan !" exclaimed the goose ;

“ You can't be in your senses,-you'd be drown'd.”-
“ I do not care,” quoth Dan, “ I see no use

In staying here, and, if I fell on ground,
I must be dash'd to bits; oh! don't refuse;

The crew perhaps will catch me safe and sound.
So open just your claw and let me tumble !
I'll trust in God, with faith sincere and humble."

31.
“ Had you not better let some body fall,

To ascertain the spot whereon you'd light?
Some piece of money, though it were but small,

Would be sufficient.”—Dan search'd left and right,
But not a farthing could he find at all,

Or aught to drop. “ They're going out of sight,
I'll try my chance; oh! dear sir, let me go,
Or I shall never reach the ship below.”+

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* Silk stockings were a principal article of contraband trade.

+ Here follows Buzzhun's account of the affair, for the benefit of the literati. Fogartius homo erat tam modestus, “Nil habeo,” inquit. “ Nihil! O projicias Ut finem verum carminis celaret ;

“ Nummulum aliquem auri vel argenti. Non videar (spero) parum nunc honestus, “ Aurum ! Argentum! Urde has divitias Si narrem ut amicus mi narraret.

Mihi ne æs aheneum habenti?" Est delicatis auribus infestus;

“Rem aliam quæras.”—“Odepol conficias Fogartius igitur non eum daret ;

Si porto quicquid præter excrementi Sed in Latina possumus loqui clare, Pondus haud parvum,quod contineat venter,

Quod non audemus Anglice susurrare. Et hoc in mare mitterem libenter." Cum Daniel navem videt, missionem Anser « Merdose" clamans veniam dedit : Petit enixé a duce anserino ;

Et braccas Daniel usque ad pedes solvit, 46 Hui !” dixit anser, “ mox petitionem Strepitu multo atque vi pepedit, Mæreres, si hinc cadere te sino;

Merdamque magni ponderis devolvit, Nisi in æquor velis mersionem ;

Territus hoc, somnium statim cedit, Nam super ratem sumus non omnino. (Nam somnium erat) oculos resolvit, Dejiciens aliquid experiare,

Et ait, “ Quam fui astro malo natus Utrum in navem caderes an mare." Obdormio ebrius, surgóque cacatus."

The learned reader will remember a somewhat similar conclusion to a story in Pogo gio's Facetiæ.

Anglicc—a brass farthing,

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33.
The goose, on finding him so obstinate,

Stretch'd out his leg, and opening wide his paw,
Again dash'd Dan at his accustom'd rate

Down through the air. The goose above him saw
His body splash within the waves, and strait

A whirling eddy oped its ravening maw:
But all Dan suffer'd from his evil luck
In upper air, was nothing to this duck.

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39. But when he saw 'twas neither shark nor whale,

But Judy his own wife, in act to cast
Right on his dripping pate a second pail,

A bumper just as brimful as the last,
He brush'd aside, light as a mountain gale,

And 'scaped the waterspout, which by him past; “ Leave off," says he, “ and better manners learn: O Judy, Judy, why art thou so stern?”–*

40. “ How can you ask ?” quoth she, “ you drunken dog,

Who never come beneath this wicked roof, That you can move away, but like a log,

Lie quite knock'd up, and helpless. Keep aloof
From Mountain daisies—that you shall, you hog,

Next time I catch you this way, hand and hoof
I'll have you pinion'd smartly, I engage:
You know not yet what 'tis to rouse my rage.”-

41.
says

Dan n; I promise on my word,
Never to drink as I have done to-night ;
But 'twas no joke-or rather 'twas absurd,

To souse me so with water : such a fright
I got as made me dream that things occurr'd

Queerer than ever chanced to mortal wight:
So don't be angry any more, but come,
Come home, my heart, and do not look so grum."-

42.
This said he stagger'd forward, caught his wife

Full in his arms, and smack'd her with a kiss ; (The plan most excellent, upon my life,

Of stopping women's angry mouths is this,)
When Mrs Blake return'd, for mischief rife,

Her hands of water full, of fire her phiz :
But Judy, who had grown quite soft and loving,
Begg’d off poor Paddy in a style most moving.

43.
What points she urged—how Mrs Mulshenan

Vapour'd about the honour of her house How Mrs Blake's well practised clapper ran,

Reviling men addicted to carouseHow she at last was pacified-how Dan

Begg’d (but in vain) permission from his spouse To take for fear of cold, but one more glass Being in haste I here beg leave to pass.

44. In fine, they routed Blake, who stretch'd along

The hearth was dreaming, but more pleasantly, And sallying out, moved off the staggering throng,

(For, entre nous, the girls had spiced their tea.) But, spite of vows, next night, believe my song,

The friends attack'd the grog, and gallantly
Got drunk again—the which I do attest :
I have it from authority the best.

MORAL OF THE WHOLE POEM.
ΑΡΙΣΤΟΝ ΜΕΝ ΥΔΩΡ.

PINDAR.
MANKIND! ye learn from this with truth, that slaughter
Of brandy can't be cured by pails of water.

* See Milman's Samor, the Lord of the Bright City.

“ O duty, duty, why art thou so stern !" Somewhat similar. I prefer my own.

Erplicit. Daniel O'Rourke is at length concluded. The composition of this poem has beguiled many a weary moment, and, I trust, purified by the sweet sentimentalities of poetry many an hour which might else have been devoted to subjects less sacred. That it can make a deep and lasting impression on the morals of my country, is my wish, though my modesty forbids me to say my expectation : but if one reader rises from its pérusal with a heart better adapted for the reception of the sublime and devotional—if one spirit has been refreshed by the inspiration of holy musings while reading it--if one better citizen, one better man, has been made by the work I have just finished, I shall not look upon my labour to have been in vain.

F. OʻFOGARTY.

SONNET.
FOGARTY ! FRIEND AND PARTNER OF MY HEART,
GLORY OF BLARNEY'S CASTELLATED TOWN;

NOW THAT THY POEM, WORK OF HIGH RENOWN,
EQUALLY DEAR TO NATURE AS TO ART,
TO BYRON AS TO BOWLES, HAS FOUND AN END,

I HAIL THEE IN THIS SONNET, BARD DIVINE !

IN VERSE PERHAPS NOT DELICATE OR FINE,
BUT HONEST, SUCH AS FRIEND SHOULD WRITE TO FRIEND!
HIGH ABOVE EARTH, THY FAME SHALL MOUNT, AS HIGH

AS O'ER THE BOTTLE SHOOTS THE ASPIRING CORK,
WHEN GAS CARBONIC MAKES IT FORTH TO FLY

FROM THE CLOSE FLASK WHERE STREAMS OF SODA WORK,
LEAVING THE FIZZING FUME BEHIND, 80 THOU
SHALT O'ER THE MURMURING CROWD TO ETHER PLOUGH.

Quoth Thos. JENNINGS,
Founder of the Soda-Water School of Poetry.

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[In addition to the Sonnet presented to us by the great Bard of Soda, we have been favoured with the following lines from the able pen of a favourite

Correspondent. We trust our friend Mr Fogarty's notorious and national mon
desty will not be put to the blush by the well-deserved encomiums contained
in them.-C. N.)

TO FOGARTY O'FOGARTY, ESQ. OF BLARNEY.
BABD of the West! thy lay shall still be read
Long as a mountain-daisy rears its head;
Long as the moon shall gild the glowing scene;
Long as her man shall o'er her surface reign ;
Long as an eagle dwells near Bantry Bay;
Long as towards heaven he wings his airy way;
Long as a goose a cackling cry shall give,
(That is at least while Wood and Waithman live ;)
Long as a wife shall chide her drunken lord,
When in an alehouse she beholds him floor'd.

While England's tongue survives—or, what's the same,
While North's great Work keeps flourishing in fame,
So long shalt thou, my Fogarty, impart
Ecstatic pleasure to the feeling heart.
And ages yet unborn, and lands unknown,
Shall chaunt thy verses in melifluous tone;
And pilgrims shall from far Kentucky roam,
Or from still farther Australasia come,
Or Melville Island, in the icy foam,
That they, with thirsty reverent eye, may see
The scenes immortalized by Fogarty!

Quoth D. DICK,
Of the C. X. and ..

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