The philosophy of William Shakespeare delineating in seven hundred and fifty passages, selected from his plays, the multiform phases of the human mind

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Inhoudsopgave

The brother and sister
362
The cares of the great
369
The crow pecking at the eagle
375
The distressed father
377
The evil power
383
The fairys release from her earthly
389
The friends pledge
396
The good queens hour of agony
402
The great soul cannot stoop to vileness
408
The hangmans comfort
414
The heart
420
The hero oercome by cowardice
427
The Kings death
439
The Kings legacyexperience 384
446
The Kings reflection on misfortune 599
452
The King the father and the son phi
454
The ladys treasury of secrets revealed
460
The law before the gospel
467
The misery of suspicion
473
The mothers malediction
479
The mystery of death
482
its mate
488
The peer the best judge of the princes
494
The philosophy of merriment
501
The power of habit 561
504
The reckoning day ever approaching
510
There is a divinity that so doth hedge
520
The return of consciousness
524
The shrews portrait
530
The soul in doubt and fear
536
The spirit of contradiction conquered
541
The republicans apology for destroy
547
The trials of high position
553
The troubles of the soul beyond natural
559
The unity of faith where true love lives
566
The warriors anger
572
The way to enjoy nature is to become
578
The wife
584
The wolf and the lamb
590
The worm that dieth not without repent
594
Time a happy or miserable companion
601
UNCERTAINTY of secular opinions
607
Utterings of the heart
611
When ignorance is bliss tis folly to
617
Wifes logic
623
Winning the shrew
624
Wives should persuade rather than
630
Woman the better man
636
Wooing wedding and repenting
642

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Populaire passages

Pagina 543 - O, there be players that I have seen play, and heard others praise, and that highly, not to speak it profanely, that neither having the accent of Christians nor the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have so strutted and bellowed that I have thought some of nature's journeymen had made men, and not made them well, they imitated humanity so abominably.
Pagina 19 - O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I ! Is it not monstrous, that this player here, But in a fiction, in a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit, That, from her working, all his visage wann'd ; Tears in his eyes, distraction in's aspect, A broken voice, and his whole function suiting With forms to his conceit ? And all for nothing ! For Hecuba ! What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba, That he should weep for her...
Pagina 80 - I have lived long enough : my way of life Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf ; And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
Pagina 505 - Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off : And pity, like a naked new-born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, hors'd Upon the sightless couriers of the air, Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall drown the wind.
Pagina 505 - tis done, then 'twere well It were done quickly. If the assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch With his surcease success; that but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'd jump the life to come.
Pagina 21 - I'll observe his looks; I'll tent him to the quick; if he do blench, I know my course. The spirit, that I have seen, May be a devil: and the devil hath power To assume a pleasing shape; yea, and, perhaps, Out of my weakness, and my melancholy, (As he is very potent with such spirits,) Abuses me to damn me: I'll have grounds More relative than this: The play's the thing, Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king.
Pagina 416 - Alas ! alas ! Why, all the souls that were, were forfeit once ; And he that might the 'vantage best have took, Found out the remedy : how would you be, If he, which is the top of judgment, should But judge you, as you are? O, think on that ; And mercy then will breathe within your lips, Like man new made.
Pagina 434 - That those whom you call'd fathers did beget you. Be copy now to men of grosser blood, • And teach them how to war. And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture; let us swear That you are worth your breeding, which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, ) That hath not noble lustre in your eyes. I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips, Straining upon the start. The game's afoot! Follow your spirit, and upon this charge Cry,...
Pagina 317 - With deafning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly, death itself awakes ? Canst thou, O partial sleep! give thy repose To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude ; And, in the calmest and most stillest night, With all appliances and means to boot, Deny it to a king ? Then, happy low, lie down ! Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
Pagina 529 - Cromwell, I did not think to shed a tear In all my miseries; but thou hast forc'd me Out of thy honest truth to play the woman. Let's dry our eyes: and thus far hear me, Cromwell ; And, — when I am forgotten, as I shall be ; And sleep in dull cold marble, where no mention Of me more must be heard of, — say, I taught thee, Say, Wolsey, — that once trod the ways of glory, And sounded all the depths and shoals of honour, — Found thee a way, out of his wreck, to rise in; A sure and safe one,...

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